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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
We have found ourselves in possession if a 1972 Alberg 30. It was a project boat but the previous owner is now married with children and decided to sell the boat and all the gear. boat is stripped and contents in my garage. it has the fiberglass liner molded interior. I have found lots of good info on the internet restoring Albergs and I have rebuilt\refitted the two sailboats I have owned. I would like to build a custom interior. Raising the bunk height for improved storage, same with the V berth, add extra batteries and increasing tankage. What I would like is an opinion on is the interior layout. I am looking for layout ideas with an aim to seaworthiness, efficiency and usefulness at sea. A good layout while in harbour entertaining on weekends may not be good while at sea. We plan on extended cruising with some offshore sailing. I like the interior of the Acadian yawl which is similar to the Alberg 30. Galley is moved forward and it has a quarter berth to starboard. This is a similar layout to our HR 28. I like the quarter berth which is handy for many reasons. The alberg design is utilitarian. can a more modern design be found or is this a case better is the enemy of good? I invite your opinions please....
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Yes the bottom picture is the state of my boat!. I like the idea of dual tanks as yours amidships. V-berth modified for storage - good ideas. I like the layout of your galley, but looks like you have removed the engine. Did you repower with an outboard or go electric?t
I do like the fresh interior of your boat. Nice you made provisions for your pets. I have dogs so my cushions will not be of light sporty colors. yours are very nice by the way.
Thanks for taking the time to post.
 

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Just my humble opinion on a 'seaworthy' interior design.

The interior should be so designed such that one can go forward or aft, etc. during a 'viscous' seastate ..... and always has a 'hand-hold' in close proximity, so one doesnt have to let go of one handhold to reach another out of reach hand-hold.
The underlying reason is - human blood makes a mess of even varnished interior brightwork and 'stuff'.

Such is the mountain climber's 'mantra', at least for the ones who dont 'fall and get hurt a lot'.

;-)
 

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yup

a seaworthy interior is different than a nice looking or awesomely restored interior as the abive pics show

like rich says

handhold or grab holds

Im a fan of centerline stainless rails or good old hemp lines or rode, down the middle of the cabin to grab to

rounded corners on all cabinets, bulkheads, tables, furniture...

anti skid grip on the cabin sole in certain places like over the nav table and entrance to head...companionway etc

gimballed stove obviously

sea berths using canvas on each side

netting

stuff like that
 
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Moving the galley forward is not going to make it more fun to use underway. There's a reason designers put them in the aftmost corner of the salon. Handholds are a good thing. In a boat that short and narrow you won't need many. Raising the v-berths (since you won't be using them under way anyway) and using the space underneath for gear stowage makes a lot of sense. It will make for better performance and roll-stopping than putting heavy tanks in the ends of the boat, even if the gear a a little more difficult to get to. As mentioned above, don't even think of taking out the engine. You're not the Pardeys, with unlimited time to row as far as you want for a month.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I appreciate everyone's input. Chrisncate has certainly put a lot of work into their boat very nice indeed. metal toe rail is something I am considering but I do like a bulwark maybe 6-8 inches...wait I am hijacking my own thread this is a interior post. The devil is in the details and anti skid in key areas is one of those details that prevent injuries. good tip on hand rails canvas for sea berths. All great stuff and I will incorporate these tips in my design as soon as I come up with a design that is. Skene's elements of yacht design gives some basic principles and boats are as individual as their skippers. I know I want a quarter berth. the fuel tank is on the starboard side there is space under it for a quarter berth. I Think an access panel could be incorporated to gain access to the side of the engine and sea cocks. I have a thing about being able to access all the boat's hull inside especially below below the waterline. Thanks again for the good info
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Moving the galley forward is not going to make it more fun to use underway. There's a reason designers put them in the aftmost corner of the salon. Handholds are a good thing. In a boat that short and narrow you won't need many. Raising the v-berths (since you won't be using them under way anyway) and using the space underneath for gear stowage makes a lot of sense. It will make for better performance and roll-stopping than putting heavy tanks in the ends of the boat, even if the gear a a little more difficult to get to. As mentioned above, don't even think of taking out the engine. You're not the Pardeys, with unlimited time to row as far as you want for a month.
Paul you raise a very good point with regards to the galley. this is the kind of feedback I need. The galley is a big deal on a small boat. What are the pros and cons of such a placement? I suspect locating the galley more forward would benefit in gaining space but this space lacks one's ability to brace when cooking and would make it hard to use. Good for at anchor or calmer seas. Or could we make concessions and live with it? hmmm points to ponder.....
 

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Lots of good ideas for making a seaworthy cabin already mentioned in this thread, but here's a few more to consider:

- fiddles on counters/shelves/flat spaces to keep stuff from rolling off
- centerline overhead handhold
- keep electronics and electric panel away from the companionway to reduce risk of getting wet
- sail locker for extra sails (storm sails, spinnaker, etc.)
 

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I had planned on handholds, nets and all the other crap you're supposed to have. It was originally on the big list to do. Never got to it before getting rid of the boat. Yes, I did sharpish corners in some areas, I just needed to finish the damn thing by the time we got to building this stuff.

It was already coming to an end by that point, and frankly I was already checking out mentally on this stupid boat by the time I built the interior.
crap happens bud

your alberg was/is a thing of beauty:)
 

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Paul you raise a very good point with regards to the galley. this is the kind of feedback I need. The galley is a big deal on a small boat. What are the pros and cons of such a placement? I suspect locating the galley more forward would benefit in gaining space but this space lacks one's ability to brace when cooking and would make it hard to use. Good for at anchor or calmer seas. Or could we make concessions and live with it? hmmm points to ponder.....
wow now!

how farther forward are you talking? unless you are on a big boat galleys NEED to be closest to the companionway...fumes, heat, steam and in case if an emergency they need to be closest to the "outside"

unless you have a dual cabin boat and big I have seen like an an ocean 71 for example that the galley is in the middle, fully vented, in between cabins and living areas...done this way with chartering in mind

on a small boat no no no!

you need to be able to throw something on fire straight out jajaja straight shot to the ocean in an emergency...

just my thoughts

also regarding galleys we are a huge fan of straps to keep you in place between the oven/sink combo and whatever bulkhead or structure you have surrounding it

it would steady us at sea, I have also seen gimballed seats that hang down from the ceiling that you can steady yourself on and used both your hands for cooking

goes without saying that foot pumps are the way to go for a practical and seaworthy galley at sea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree with Christian. You saved one of these old girls good job. My new mast came from an Alberg that was in perfect shape. the guy could not sell the boat quickly so valuable fittings were removed and they cut it up with a chain saw and parted out the sail boat.
 

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YIKES...Im jelous I havealways wanted an alberg 30 or triton to solo sail around in...and make bulletproof

the massive experience of others is out there with these 2 boats...just look at yves gelinas and james baldwin and collectively you have enough info on these boats to go anywhere in the world you want

btw on the canvas thread I mentioned yves best dodger system for small boats if anyone is interested its by far the best solution for small boat dodgers.

anywhoo

good luck hr28
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
wow now!

how farther forward are you talking? unless you are on a big boat galleys NEED to be closest to the companionway...fumes, heat, steam and in case if an emergency they need to be closest to the "outside"

unless you have a dual cabin boat and big I have seen like an an ocean 71 for example that the galley is in the middle, fully vented, in between cabins and living areas...done this way with chartering in mind

on a small boat no no no!

you need to be able to throw something on fire straight out jajaja straight shot to the ocean in an emergency...

just my thoughts

also regarding galleys we are a huge fan of straps to keep you in place between the oven/sink combo and whatever bulkhead or structure you have surrounding it

it would steady us at sea, I have also seen gimballed seats that hang down from the ceiling that you can steady yourself on and used both your hands for cooking

goes without saying that foot pumps are the way to go for a practical and seaworthy galley at sea.
here is the layout of the Acadian 30 which is similar to the Alberg 30.
 

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That Acadian's linear galley... with the sink so far forward and outboard you would need to be very vigilant about closing that sink drain seacock anytime you're likely to heel the boat over on a port tack.. instant backflooding otherwise.

Make sure you have decent headroom at the stove (and sink, too, preferably) Stooping to cook and clean up will get old quickly. Most/many smaller boats are arranged so that you are standing in the companionway then - with 'infinite' headroom, presumably. ;)

With a pop-top and/or a dodger you might even have shelter as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
YIKES...Im jelous I havealways wanted an alberg 30 or triton to solo sail around in...and make bulletproof

the massive experience of others is out there with these 2 boats...just look at yves gelinas and james baldwin and collectively you have enough info on these boats to go anywhere in the world you want

btw on the canvas thread I mentioned yves best dodger system for small boats if anyone is interested its by far the best solution for small boat dodgers.

anywhoo

good luck hr28
I have always loved the Alberg 30. I got the boat completely stripped. So I got to thinking of a custom interior. So exploring options. Yves and James have been an inspiration for sure. I agree with you Yves solution to the dodger is brilliant. I think why it never caught on in the mainstream, over the years there has been a creep of form over function. Looks and cool factor have impinged on what was utilitarian seaworthy function. dodger and binimis are a perfect example. used to be just a simple boom tent and we were good to go. Oh for simpler times......
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That Acadian's linear galley... with the sink so far forward and outboard you would need to be very vigilant about closing that sink drain seacock anytime you're likely to heel the boat over on a port tack.. instant backflooding otherwise.

Make sure you have decent headroom at the stove (and sink, too, preferably) Stooping to cook and clean up will get old quickly. Most/many smaller boats are arranged so that you are standing in the companionway then - with 'infinite' headroom, presumably. ;)

With a pop-top and/or a dodger you might even have shelter as well.
Thanks Faster

I have 6 feet of head room in the cabin so good there. Of the two boats I have owned this has been the layout of both. We have sailed inland waters\rivers coastal areas so this has been a good design. Westerly's have a similar layout too. I am trying to decide if this layout going to be adequate for extended voyaging we plan to do or rebuild in the original layout.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It was a Norvane. I was very happy with its construction, fit and finish. Top notch buying experience as well, real nice folks at Norvane. Great price as well.
I like the low (er) profile as apposed to the Cape horn. some of the other vanes take up the whole stern. Almost looks like enough space for a swim ladder. How well does it steer? Is the cost and spare parts comparable to the Aries or Cape Horn?
 
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