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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
We have found ourselves in possession if a 1972 Alberg 30. It was a project boat but the previous owner is now married with children and decided to sell the boat and all the gear. boat is stripped and contents in my garage. it has the fiberglass liner molded interior. I have found lots of good info on the internet restoring Albergs and I have rebuilt\refitted the two sailboats I have owned. I would like to build a custom interior. Raising the bunk height for improved storage, same with the V berth, add extra batteries and increasing tankage. What I would like is an opinion on is the interior layout. I am looking for layout ideas with an aim to seaworthiness, efficiency and usefulness at sea. A good layout while in harbour entertaining on weekends may not be good while at sea. We plan on extended cruising with some offshore sailing. I like the interior of the Acadian yawl which is similar to the Alberg 30. Galley is moved forward and it has a quarter berth to starboard. This is a similar layout to our HR 28. I like the quarter berth which is handy for many reasons. The alberg design is utilitarian. can a more modern design be found or is this a case better is the enemy of good? I invite your opinions please....
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Yes the bottom picture is the state of my boat!. I like the idea of dual tanks as yours amidships. V-berth modified for storage - good ideas. I like the layout of your galley, but looks like you have removed the engine. Did you repower with an outboard or go electric?t
I do like the fresh interior of your boat. Nice you made provisions for your pets. I have dogs so my cushions will not be of light sporty colors. yours are very nice by the way.
Thanks for taking the time to post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I appreciate everyone's input. Chrisncate has certainly put a lot of work into their boat very nice indeed. metal toe rail is something I am considering but I do like a bulwark maybe 6-8 inches...wait I am hijacking my own thread this is a interior post. The devil is in the details and anti skid in key areas is one of those details that prevent injuries. good tip on hand rails canvas for sea berths. All great stuff and I will incorporate these tips in my design as soon as I come up with a design that is. Skene's elements of yacht design gives some basic principles and boats are as individual as their skippers. I know I want a quarter berth. the fuel tank is on the starboard side there is space under it for a quarter berth. I Think an access panel could be incorporated to gain access to the side of the engine and sea cocks. I have a thing about being able to access all the boat's hull inside especially below below the waterline. Thanks again for the good info
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Moving the galley forward is not going to make it more fun to use underway. There's a reason designers put them in the aftmost corner of the salon. Handholds are a good thing. In a boat that short and narrow you won't need many. Raising the v-berths (since you won't be using them under way anyway) and using the space underneath for gear stowage makes a lot of sense. It will make for better performance and roll-stopping than putting heavy tanks in the ends of the boat, even if the gear a a little more difficult to get to. As mentioned above, don't even think of taking out the engine. You're not the Pardeys, with unlimited time to row as far as you want for a month.
Paul you raise a very good point with regards to the galley. this is the kind of feedback I need. The galley is a big deal on a small boat. What are the pros and cons of such a placement? I suspect locating the galley more forward would benefit in gaining space but this space lacks one's ability to brace when cooking and would make it hard to use. Good for at anchor or calmer seas. Or could we make concessions and live with it? hmmm points to ponder.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree with Christian. You saved one of these old girls good job. My new mast came from an Alberg that was in perfect shape. the guy could not sell the boat quickly so valuable fittings were removed and they cut it up with a chain saw and parted out the sail boat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
wow now!

how farther forward are you talking? unless you are on a big boat galleys NEED to be closest to the companionway...fumes, heat, steam and in case if an emergency they need to be closest to the "outside"

unless you have a dual cabin boat and big I have seen like an an ocean 71 for example that the galley is in the middle, fully vented, in between cabins and living areas...done this way with chartering in mind

on a small boat no no no!

you need to be able to throw something on fire straight out jajaja straight shot to the ocean in an emergency...

just my thoughts

also regarding galleys we are a huge fan of straps to keep you in place between the oven/sink combo and whatever bulkhead or structure you have surrounding it

it would steady us at sea, I have also seen gimballed seats that hang down from the ceiling that you can steady yourself on and used both your hands for cooking

goes without saying that foot pumps are the way to go for a practical and seaworthy galley at sea.
here is the layout of the Acadian 30 which is similar to the Alberg 30.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
YIKES...Im jelous I havealways wanted an alberg 30 or triton to solo sail around in...and make bulletproof

the massive experience of others is out there with these 2 boats...just look at yves gelinas and james baldwin and collectively you have enough info on these boats to go anywhere in the world you want

btw on the canvas thread I mentioned yves best dodger system for small boats if anyone is interested its by far the best solution for small boat dodgers.

anywhoo

good luck hr28
I have always loved the Alberg 30. I got the boat completely stripped. So I got to thinking of a custom interior. So exploring options. Yves and James have been an inspiration for sure. I agree with you Yves solution to the dodger is brilliant. I think why it never caught on in the mainstream, over the years there has been a creep of form over function. Looks and cool factor have impinged on what was utilitarian seaworthy function. dodger and binimis are a perfect example. used to be just a simple boom tent and we were good to go. Oh for simpler times......
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That Acadian's linear galley... with the sink so far forward and outboard you would need to be very vigilant about closing that sink drain seacock anytime you're likely to heel the boat over on a port tack.. instant backflooding otherwise.

Make sure you have decent headroom at the stove (and sink, too, preferably) Stooping to cook and clean up will get old quickly. Most/many smaller boats are arranged so that you are standing in the companionway then - with 'infinite' headroom, presumably. ;)

With a pop-top and/or a dodger you might even have shelter as well.
Thanks Faster

I have 6 feet of head room in the cabin so good there. Of the two boats I have owned this has been the layout of both. We have sailed inland waters\rivers coastal areas so this has been a good design. Westerly's have a similar layout too. I am trying to decide if this layout going to be adequate for extended voyaging we plan to do or rebuild in the original layout.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It was a Norvane. I was very happy with its construction, fit and finish. Top notch buying experience as well, real nice folks at Norvane. Great price as well.
I like the low (er) profile as apposed to the Cape horn. some of the other vanes take up the whole stern. Almost looks like enough space for a swim ladder. How well does it steer? Is the cost and spare parts comparable to the Aries or Cape Horn?
 

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
OP, while we're on the topic of Albergs and seaworthiness, I'd like to mention some other areas you might consider. Chainplates and their gussets is an area to upgrade. The stock ones are anemic at best, and undersized (as you probably know already). I built up all the gussets with glass cloth and epoxy, made them very thick and better adhered to the hull, then made 2" wide by 1/4" thick bronze chainplates. I used big 1/2" bolts and nuts in them (bronze as well of course). They were rock solid and the deck would pull apart before they would. I can post pics if you're interested in seeing them.

Also worth noting is portlights. The A 30 has big windows and we had planned drop boards (never got to it before selling though). We took the original cast aluminum frames and wrapped them in glass cloth and epoxy, then used thicker than stock glass and through bolted everything. Sealed everything including portlights above the waterline with butyl. Never a single leak with that stuff. Also, as you can see in the pics, we added four round opening ports - one in front of the V, two just forward of the main cabins big ports, and one large one on the rear bulkhead. The ventilation they provided was very much needed, as the A 30 interior is a floating basement.

We took the seaworthiness thing (exterior wise) pretty far. We sealed up every through hull except for the scuppers, I made each compartment inside the hull an epoxied water tight bulkhead containment area in case of a holing, etc. I have pics of all this stuff if you're ever interested in seeing it for your own research.

The A 30 is a great boat, but honestly I don't know if I could recommend to anyone to go too far work wise on one. After we finished, I kind of wished I'd just bought a Bristol Channel Cutter and hit the road right away (sea I guess).
Yes I am very interested in seeing pics of the mods you mentioned.
Much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
im an aries fan true and true and despite what is said about wieght they arent that much different than the monitor...

in any case
I guess some designs of wind vanes work better on some boats than others. I would rather have something than inspires confidence in its robustness crashing around the ogie for days on end....
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Well, here are some pics, hope they help and inspire your Alberg journey!

Bronze CP's, cut not drilled yet. Old ones in pic for perspective:



Installed, G10 for backing plates:



Glassing/epoxying portlights:



Faired out, painted and installed:



I laminated the scupper through hull mounts this way, then epoxy coated them. Thought being if it ever cracked or got compromised, it'd be unlikely that both pieces would crack as the grains were opposing (plus it just looks cool):



5200, the one application of such dastardly stuff:




Laying down the Kiwi Grip, we love that stuff and can't say enough good things about it:








Pic are great!:) I never thought of using bronze. good plan. I scrounged up some thick ss though. Thicker and go with longer bases for the lower front shrouds. Saw a pic on the alberg site. I lolve the windlass. nice piece of kit...She has a nice air of elegance to her....
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
If you are planning the boat for offshore use, i would suggest that places be made up with a particular function in mind. Having dual function often means that neither function is done well. For example, I would make the v-berth into storage only and give up on it being a place to sleep. In this way you can optimize for storage of bulky items like sail bags and spare anchors. You might want to have your chain locker under this area. Having the chain close to the mast is a good thing. Similarly, I would not have a quarter berth. It will be used mainly for storage and will not be terrific for storage or sleeping. Your sleeping accommodation will be just be the settees. Take time figuring out lee cloths, ventilation, and lighting for the the berths.

Use LEDs for the interior (and exterior), the power savings are wonderful. I would not go with either an outboard or electric drive. In five years of cruising I have not seen one electric drive. There are times you need to motor a fair distance. You can live with an Atomic 30 but a diesel is much preferred. Chris's point about the difficulty of installing a particular vane is a good one. We tend to think about how the unit fits on the outside of the transom without considering the inside. We chose a Monitor because it was relatively easy to install on a transom with many hoses and a major reinforcement. We could not have used a Cap Horn for example. BTW, very pleased with the Monitor after 30,000+ miles. It has done well. Also you see more Monitors in isolated places than any other vane - not to say the others aren't up to it. For a boat your size I would not go with an Aries - big and heavy and technology has advanced since it was designed.
I concur with having a diesel powerplant. lucky for me the boat came with a yanmar 2gm20. I had to make it fit. pretty easy actually. need to change the prop as the 6 pitch for the old atomic 4 is a little weak she goes but slow.(a pals boat not mine) I do have a preference for norvane and capehorn vanes but you bring up a good point with monitors. If these are more common then I surmise, parts might be easy to come by in remote places either by hook or by crook, facilitating faster reparability if necessary. Thank you for comments
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
this is very true...a barn door rudder or deep attached rudder needs and is best with a trim tab

a sayes for example has been known to work well with skeg inboard rudders

on a spade choose your poison

beleive me Im not knocking the monitor...however they do have some flaws revealed as usual in heavy weather sailing...mostly to do with welds and strength here and there

the aries before the monitor was the golden standard

I loved the 2 I have had...they are very very strong, just be careful and oil them and dont crack the castings...this is were an aries suffers...as its harder to fix than an all stainless vane like the monitor or norvane for that matter.

there are many nice windvanes these days to choose from

there are many threads on here where the models have been refferenced.:)
Yes. Stainless can be welded fairly easily. cast not so much. Although I have my favorites I am still doing my homework on windvanes but first gotta get the darn boat together..:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I never liked the Cape Horn on an Alberg, only for the fact that you lose the entire rear locker to house it's bits and pieces. Looks amazing and probably works amazing, but an entire locker being lost on such a small boat? Just for a clean looking vane? Nah.

The Norvane (imo) is a great bang for the buck. The monitor is great, but IIRC about twice the price.
It is a noble piece of kit but a boat with limited space storage is a premium, I have to consider the options...
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
let me know if you need any help with the 2gm20

is it the f? fresh water?

we loved ours on my h28 back in the day

most reliable diesel I have ever had the pleasure of working on

bang bang bang bang all day long
Thanks for the offer. I shall. The engine is not the F model it uses coolant. The engine has not been fitted yet. I have made some initial test trails with a mockup of the engine I made out of cardboard. The forward mounts were the issue so I lag bolted thick aluminum to enlarge the mount point. Basically replicating what I have read on the alberg site. I was concerned about space but the engine will fit nicely. She will get a new prop shaft and I plan to re-bed the stern tube just to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Don't get any vane based on the assumption that you can get parts anywhere, other than from the manufacturer. In less remote places you might be able to find a machine shop to fabricate something, but the standard routine is to have a spare parts kit from the manufacturer. BTW, Monitor parts are not cheap but you can't go down the street to find replacements for custom bits so they got you. On the other hand, the company is there and very responsive with help.

Before you get too far into your choice look to see where you would run the control lines.
So true. no substitute for the right parts. at this stage of the game I am assessing the virtues of the various designs, pros and cons and so forth. eventually I will make an informed decision, I have lots of time so no point in rushing. This project won't be in the water for at least a year. Still have to sell my Hinterhoeller 28 yet....
 
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