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I found the video to be a self serving advertisement for their business.
Anybody can see how it happened.
Two skippers were not paying attention! Rules of the road? When you are out sailing and a fast motorboat seems to be bearing down on you, it would make sense to change course to avoid a potential collision, even if you were the stand on vessel. As for the power boat, I'd bet there was something (a pretty girl?) distracting the driver.
No excuse; both were at fault and were dam lucky that nobody got hurt or worse.
 

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So, imagine you are sitting in the seamanship class, and the instructor has finished explaining that you should have taken steps to avoid collision. Next, someone raises their hand and says "yes, but specifically, what was the sailboat supposed to do?" The instructor repeats "avoid," and the student says "No, exactly what would you personally have done, in what order, and why?"

Let's make some assumptions to narrow things down:
* Sailboat at 60 to true wind, since the jib is not that tight and the main sheet is not far out. A WAG, but we need to be specific.
* Powerboat was running about 15 knots and the sailboat about 5 knots. There was some wind and 15 knots is typical for these boats between fishing spots.
* We don't know if any last second course changes occurred. I recall they did not, but I don't remember the details. Assume not.

Fire away. No "on one hand...." allowed. What would you have done, and how early would you have done it.

I thought it was pretty funny that they never said specifically what the sailor should have done. Lame for a class.
 

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Hi,

If it were me, I would harden up and go behind the powerboat. I would most likely hold my course until the powerboat was around 100 yards away and then turned up enough to safely pass behind the powerboat. I would give a loud long honk on my air horn as he passed me.

Barry


Fire away. No "on one hand...." allowed. What would you have done, and how early would you have done it.

I thought it was pretty funny that they never said specifically what the sailor should have done. Lame for a class.
 

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Hi,

If it were me, I would harden up and go behind the powerboat. I would most likely hold my course until the powerboat was around 100 yards away and then turned up enough to safely pass behind the powerboat. I would give a loud long honk on my air horn as he passed me.

Barry
100 yards is way too close for me. What if he saw you and turned the same way? Do you think there would be time to avoid collision then?
I'd have probably made my course change at a half mile or so, and a major one at that. I like to give boats that appear to have not noticed me at a half mile a wide berth and make a course change that is unmistakable, in case the helmsman does end up seeing me.
 

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"Turn early and turn big." That's what my Dad taught us as children. I know that the powerboats usually buzz close and go around us at the last moment, but you can't count on that. When you see someone big, or someone fast, make a turn away from them - like 180 degrees away - or at least enough away from them, that they can clearly see that you are making a course change. Use your horn. 5 blasts. I know that it's hard to hear, but it might just make a difference, and it will show that you were active in the after action report. No horn?
shame on you!! :devil Get one and keep it near and handy. And yes, I understand that sometimes you just can't do enough.
 

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Too many unknown variables to know what I’d have done differently, as the sailboat. Obviously take some action, but how open was the seaway, depths to each side, other traffic, etc. Would one turn put me into the irons, as opposed to the opposite? Would slowing down be enough? Slowing is usually my first early move, if relative bearing isn’t changing and give way isn’t making a move. Next move is a big turn, before it’s too late, as needed.

The earlier one makes a change, the more options one has.
 

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Fire away. No "on one hand...." allowed. What would you have done, and how early would you have done it.

I thought it was pretty funny that they never said specifically what the sailor should have done. Lame for a class.
Since the article mentioned the jib was to starboard, I'll assume the boat was on port tack.

The by-the-book procedure would have been to sound 5 blasts as soon 1) you've recognized a CBDR condition and 2) the other vessel doesn't appear to be taking action as she should. The next step, assuming the other boat still hasn't altered course, would be to take action myself.

I would have likely fallen off 60-90°, and "in ample time", meaning not waiting until the last minute. Distance depends on how much sea room I have to work with, but I'm certainly going to be a bit twitchy by the half mile mark.
 

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I would harden up and go behind the powerboat. I would most likely hold my course until the powerboat was around 100 yards away
Powerboat going 25 kts. 100 yards = 7 seconds.

How much "hardening up" and maneuvering will you accomplish in 7 seconds?
 

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Too many unknown variables to know what I’d have done differently, as the sailboat. Obviously take some action, but how open was the seaway, depths to each side, other traffic, etc. Would one turn put me into the irons, as opposed to the opposite? Would slowing down be enough? Slowing is usually my first early move, if relative bearing isn’t changing and give way isn’t making a move. Next move is a big turn, before it’s too late, as needed.

The earlier one makes a change, the more options one has.
Whimp! Say what you would do, period, no waffling.

Wide open on depths and traffic. We gave you the courses and prevailing conditions. That's all the information you have.
 

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Since the article mentioned the jib was to starboard, I'll assume the boat was on port tack.

The by-the-book procedure would have been to sound 5 blasts as soon 1) you've recognized a CBDR condition and 2) the other vessel doesn't appear to be taking action as she should. The next step, assuming the other boat still hasn't altered course, would be to take action myself.

I would have likely fallen off 60-90°, and "in ample time", meaning not waiting until the last minute. Distance depends on how much sea room I have to work with, but I'm certainly going to be a bit twitchy by the half mile mark.
It was in the first post link. Starboard tack, true wind about 60 degrees true. Collision from starboard on the beam.
 

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Powerboat going 25 kts. 100 yards = 7 seconds.

How much "hardening up" and maneuvering will you accomplish in 7 seconds?
And if you are reasonably close to beating, which they appear to have been, harden-up is a minor course change with these relative bearings. It could be effective IF you did it very early, no less than 1/4 mile.

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What would I have done?

: If I reacted early I would harden up. Distance to windward is money in the bank anyway. This is my normal reaction.

: If the situation developed late (they did not tell us how long the relative bearings were constant) I would honk and bear away hard. Hardening up doesn't help, attempting to tack away places me dead in the water. slowing by throwing sheets off is not always effective. Honking is important because it gets eyes up and should suggest that you maybe taking evasive action.

A risk of bearing off with a multi is that my boat's speed may jump from 6-7 knots to 12-14 knots in the few seconds it takes to bear away. Yes, that fast, placing me beam to with greater speed. Unnerving.

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The more troubling situation is with the chute up in a breeze. An unplanned jibe will cause a mess of chute on the rigging and leave you dead in the water. It can also cost you a chute, so you will hesitate. Rounding up can cause a broach or capsize, though you can throw off sheets. You will also be out of control and nearly dead in the water. You really need to make this call early. This is when I am most likely to use the horn, because options can be limited and the range of simple course changes rather narrow.

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My objection is that they made a long video and failed to go through the options, one -at-a-time, which is what I would have been paying the teacher for.
 

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Whimp! Say what you would do, period, no waffling.

Wide open on depths and traffic. We gave you the courses and prevailing conditions. That's all the information you have.
It was in the first post link. Starboard tack, true wind about 60 degrees true. Collision from starboard on the beam.
Sorry professor, not taking the time to read all the prerequisites. With no smiley after the name calling, I’ve got one for you too, but it’s in sign language.

If I’m on starboard tack, 60 degrees off the wind, with a power boat approaching at a 90 degree angle from starboard, with no relative bearing change and they are not adjusting course, I first slow down to see if they’ll pass in front. If far enough away and I decide to make a move, it would pinch up to take their stern, which would also slow me down. If too late and I need an emergency evasive maneuver (shouldn’t be allowed to happen) I would fall off hard. Never turn toward and increase the closure rate. If you’re going to collide, do it at the lowest relative speed.
 

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* Sailboat at 60 to true wind, since the jib is not that tight and the main sheet is not far out. A WAG, but we need to be specific.
It was in the first post link. Starboard tack, true wind about 60 degrees true. Collision from starboard on the beam.
Sorry, I read that as 60° off the wind. Using the actual directions of the boats in the report (SW for the sail, E for the power) meant a wind from the NE would put the boat on a run.

In any case, assuming starboard tack, my answer would then be to tack. I'm acting in good time, so I have time and space to work with. In this case any loss of speed from tacking would still act to my advantage, and we're not so close that I'm worried about the increased closure rate that Minnewaska mentioned.
 

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Our standard procedure for a powerboat approaching at speed on a collision course.

When the powerboat, having made no change of course or speed, is several hundred yards away, change direction tacking or jibing if necessary, to a course which is 90% away from the power boat's path. If the wind is light, start and engage the engine.

You cant make anything more obvious and you need to assume the oncoming boat is actually intending to change course and may do so simultaneously, so minor course changes on your part are dangerous.

On a busy weekend, we'll typically perform this procedure 3-4 times.

Something of a pain but better than what could happen.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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Whimp! Say what you would do, period, no waffling.

The more troubling situation is with the chute up in a breeze.
Oh stop it. We don't know the specifics and he wasn't in a multi hull or flying a kite.

I've heard too many sailors pontificate about being "right" about being the stand on vessel. To hell with that !

Minnewaska and Scotty C have the right advice.

"Turn early and turn big." ... When you see someone big, or someone fast, make a turn away from them - like 180 degrees away - or at least enough away from them, that they can clearly see that you are making a course change.
The earlier one makes a change, the more options one has.
Steering around hazards is just part of being out there. I learned to sail on the busy Delaware River then moved to even busier Barnegat Bay. Both were crowded with power boaters who'd never heard the phrase "give way vessel". When I talked to them off the water they had no idea.

So better to give trouble a wide berth and enjoy a relaxing day on the water.

On a busy weekend, we'll typically perform this procedure 3-4 times.
That was my experience on Barnegat Bay. After 10 or 11 years sailing there it got to where holiday weekends like July 4th and Labor Day we'd only do limited sailing in the morning while the power boat crowd were nursing their hangovers. Afternoons were for socializing with friends.
 

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Sorry professor, not taking the time to read all the prerequisites. With no smiley after the name calling, I’ve got one for you too, but it’s in sign language.

If I’m on starboard tack, 60 degrees off the wind, with a power boat approaching at a 90 degree angle from starboard, with no relative bearing change and they are not adjusting course, I first slow down to see if they’ll pass in front. If far enough away and I decide to make a move, it would pinch up to take their stern, which would also slow me down. If too late and I need an emergency evasive maneuver (shouldn’t be allowed to happen) I would fall off hard. Never turn toward and increase the closure rate. If you’re going to collide, do it at the lowest relative speed.
I was just joking. I am very sorry if you took it any other way. That is the weakness of forums. I am sorry.

And we both chose the same reaction; harden up if early, fall off hard if it is last moment. Situations can evolve quickly
 

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The problem with tacking in light air, particularly at the last moment, is that you may miss stays and that you may simple end up dead in the water, either way, due to lack of power and time to accelerate You may actually present a larger target. Remember, the tack is unplanned, so it may not go smoothly.

Tacking early is fine, of course... but if you were actually headed somewhere other than dead upwind (they were not hard on the wind) it's not your first choice for an early reaction.
 
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