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Discussion Starter #1
Any sailboats preppers getting ready to sail out to see when the **** hits the fan?

Just wondering what you old salts think would be good equipment to have on board and supplies and how to store them if a pandemic,economoic collaps or wtver else happens. Land will be a complete **** show so being out to for a bit might be a good choice.

Any advice greatly appreciated!

:2 boat::2 boat::ship-captain::cut_out_animated_em
 

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In my opinion heading out to sea to avoid the apocalypse is a fool’s errand. You’ll need to make landfall somewhere sooner or later to resupply.....if the problem is bad enough to justify running from it it’s probably gonna be bad enough to to still be around when you run out of food or diesel.
 

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Cruising yachts can provide:

1-A temporary place of refuge. How long highly depends on the boat and your local waters or

2-A means to a safe haven, or a better place to be. It’s best to have that haven set up to welcome you. At worse it keeps more options available.

But as a long term boot hole? That does not sound like a great idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I mean bunch of can food water disallination system and solar and fishing rods what else would be good to have
 

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You will need sharpened steel pike type weapons. It's important to destroy the brain with a quick jab and move on to the next one.

The debate as to if they can swim, can walk under water, will drown or just thrash and bob around is very much up in the air. Those with intact skin may hold in gasses that will make them float like Portuguese-Man-Of-War jelly fish.

Dolphin brains, being very much like human brains, should be susceptible to the virus if bitten. If those marine mammals turn all hell is going to break loose. They swim like demons and jump like leopards.

I'd be most worried about them climbing up the anchor line so keep moving and don't sleep. They will come for you one way or another. Damn things are relentless. Don't ask me how I know.
 

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You will need sharpened steel pike type weapons. It's important to destroy the brain with a quick jab and move on to the next one.
This depends entirely upon the nature of the zombie threat. Effective for Walking Dead type infections. WWZ/Rage Virus zombies will bleed out from wounds, but may take a while (these also climb anchor lines). Undead/supernatural zombies, incineration is really the only means. Cut bits off and they just keep coming...
 

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I don't see what all the fuss about zombies is about. They're just dark minions. It's the vampires that scare me. Lots of garlic. And ginger root helps too.
 

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In my opinion heading out to sea to avoid the apocalypse is a fool’s errand. You’ll need to make landfall somewhere sooner or later to resupply.....if the problem is bad enough to justify running from it it’s probably gonna be bad enough to to still be around when you run out of food or diesel.
Though I generally agree with you, I do know a few uninhabited islands where one could survive on the indigenous flora and fauna, especially if one had a sailboat to travel between islands to increase the variety. Forty odd years ago there were even deserted islands with considerable stocks of diesel, though if still there, I can't imagine it is still usable.
However, the problems arise in the post apocalyptic world when someone comes along and wants what you have. So your 'safe haven' has to be pretty far off the beaten path and relatively unknown, because there is always going to be somebody meaner, bigger and better armed than you.
 

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good equipment to have on board
Business cards of good yacht brokers.

I knew an evangelical prepper who purchased a nice cruising boat (along with a keelboat 101 class) for an apocalypse that was supposed to happen, but didn't.
Two years of slip and insurance payments later, that boat became mine for 1/2 what he paid.
The one mod he planned to make, but never did (unfortunately for me), was a watermaker.

I would ordinarily suggest you're being absurd and that you should turn off the TV & radio and swap your tin foil hat for a chill pill. But I loved the movie Maximum Overdrive as a kid, and given the recent progress of artificial intelligence in vehicles and IoT everywhere, I might just be following you in Emilio Estevez's wake.

Wait. I just remembered the Sail Drone project. There's no escape! Aaaah!

 

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Getting offshore for a pandemic isn't a half bad idea. It may be possible to wait it out, or sail somewhere unaffected.

Long term escape from a collapsed society is impossible. I can hardly go a week without needing a mailroom full of supplies and parts. Where would you get them, as things break? They will.

A sailboat simply isn't a great long term self sufficient solution. It could work for few months, in theory. If you're lucky.
 

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When I was living aboard in the Caribe back in the 90s I tried to keep the boat self sufficient in terms of food, water and spares. Of course this is really time limited... But I liked to conceive of the boat as something akin to a spaceship... untethered from "resupply". So I tried to keep up when I had the opportunity to re supply. As such I felt a certain amount of "freedom"... and could get in the boat and sail to somewhere that was "stable" for example.... whatever that means.

After 9/11 we did head out to the boat with lots of supplies and wondered whether more attacks were coming and if we would have to escape a war zone... as crazy as that sounds. Of course we didn't. But we've seen the traffic when people are evacuating a coming natural disaster.... way worse than "Hamptonian" beach traffic.

Boat as always been pretty self sufficient and ready to go.... with basic food and water stores.
 

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Just occurred to me that the Caribbean has always been a relative hot bed of various viruses. Leave one, find another. I'm guessing one could isolate themselves ashore (from respiratory transmissions) just as effectively as sailing away. If you're not in contact, you're not in contact.

If you want to watch a good movie on isolating from an unknown contagion, watch Bird Box. Clever entertainment, but as creepy as them come.
 

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Just occurred to me that the Caribbean has always been a relative hot bed of various viruses. Leave one, find another. I'm guessing one could isolate themselves ashore (from respiratory transmissions) just as effectively as sailing away. If you're not in contact, you're not in contact.

If you want to watch a good movie on isolating from an unknown contagion, watch Bird Box. Clever entertainment, but as creepy as them come.
I was really anxious to get out of Trinidad once this Coronavirus began to spread as the EC islands have a habit of attempting to isolate themselves from the spread of contagious diseases. This happened a few years back with the Ebola epidemic that didn't happen and already getting back into Trinidad requires a health certificate/past itinerary 72 hours before arrival for all vessels, including pleasure craft.
With luck, we may be able to travel between Carriacou and SVG without problems, but many islands, including St Lucia, are going to really clamp down on international travelers, if the past is anything to go by.
If you have any plans to visit any of the islands down here, I would highly suggest that you contact their embassy in your country, or whatever country you are in, shortly before your trip and check to see what new regulations have been put in place.
 

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Capta,

As we are already in the Eastern Carib this is of more than passing interest to us. We are in Guadeloupe right now and will move to Dominique in a couple of days.

I’m PRESUMING that I can always get back into the USA, which SHOULD include PR and the USVI.

What do you think about starting a thread as a place to capture the current status of various EC island locations?
 

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Capta,

As we are already in the Eastern Carib this is of more than passing interest to us. We are in Guadeloupe right now and will move to Dominique in a couple of days.

I’m PRESUMING that I can always get back into the USA, which SHOULD include PR and the USVI.

What do you think about starting a thread as a place to capture the current status of various EC island locations?
Sounds like a good idea. My wife is actively keeping abreast of the implementation of regulations in the islands regarding this virus. I'd be happy to post as factual information becomes available from each island, on a thread.

We have zero desire to go back to the US or the VI, but I would like to be able to travel between Martinique and Trinidad w/o a whole lot of problems. For now, we're happy to sit on our mooring in Tyrrel Bay and see how things develop. I guess it's working out rather well that we decided to take this season off from chartering.
 

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A sailboat simply isn't a great long term self sufficient solution. It could work for few months, in theory. If you're lucky.
Obviously you never saw Waterworld :wink
 
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