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I think "preppers" are idiots.

However, a boat is the best way to save oneself from many types of Armageddon.

Why?

Its a floating, moving, toolbox and store shed.

At a moments notice you can go to sea for several YEARS, never touch land, never hit a hurricane, never see another person whilst feeding yourself with your fishing rod. Who was that peanut who sailed in the south Atlantic ocean for 1,000 days? Remember theres no hurricanes/cyclones in the south Atlantic. You can just drift a bit north or south depending on the season.

After some time at sea when you think its safer, you can go find an isolated island, yes theres some in the Caribbean, but theres more in the Pacific. You can have some sand and still stay away from the majority of people.

Theres no land based version of this mobile toolbox and storage shed where you can easily remove yourself safely from people, infections, gun toting loonies in a broken down civilisation.

But a 40 foot boat... ahhhh stock it as for a normal cruise, add some extras, tarps to catch water, fish hooks, books and tins of bully-beef, Vegemite and dry pasta. Self sufficient for decades. You don't need to sail fast, hell you could just hove to... 2 knots gets you where you need to be for the seasons.

:2 boat:
 

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A sailboat simply isn't a great long term self sufficient solution. It could work for few months, in theory. If you're lucky.
Actually, Tapio Lehtinen did 322 days at sea non-stop in the last GGR on a 36 foot boat, so it could be possible to double that or more with a 50 footer, I'd think. And we're not going to the southern ocean, we're better fishermen than he was, and in the tropics it is possible to catch enough rain to survive.
I really have little or no desire to spend a couple of years at sea, but if it was life and death it surely could be possible.
Add the deserted islands I mentioned above and I believe the time spent outside society could easily be stretched to 5 years or more. Would that be enough in a world wide catastrophe? Perhaps that's fodder for another thread? lol
 

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Obviously, if you're talking years, you're talking about floating around in a tub. No diesel, batteries will die, no refrigeration, not to mention other things that break. I won't even bother posting examples of things where I limped to shore, at the end of a short passage and needed to fix. Years offshore would present many of them.
 

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Obviously, if you're talking years, you're talking about floating around in a tub. No diesel, batteries will die, no refrigeration, not to mention other things that break. I won't even bother posting examples of things where I limped to shore, at the end of a short passage and needed to fix. Years offshore would present many of them.
There was a time when whalers and others spent 3 years or more at sea w/o any of those mod cons you mentioned. I spent 5.5 years sailing a gaffer built in 1909 through the SoPac w/o most of those things. No winches, one electric light (over the chart table), kerosene house, running and compass lights and refrigeration was a wet towel wrapped around the fresh caught dolphin to keep it a few degrees cooler than the ambient temperature. Yes we had an engine, but most of us on here with ocean sailing experience could do w/o that and all those things you mentioned, if need be. A well built glass boat doesn't need caulking, doesn't deteriorate in the sun or rot.
I'm unfamiliar with the expectation of breaking things on a passage. Even on the bareboats being returned to the states after 5 years in service in the islands, we rarely had breakage or breakdowns.
Of course, there would be wear and tear on the gear over a long period of time, but it can be minimized by sailing cautiously and thoughtfully. And as you said, if the point is survival, much of your time would be "floating around in a tub", with sails neatly folded and stowed below, sheets also stored, helm lashed amidships, anchors stowed below and chain kept free of saltwater, etc.
Anyway, it's fun to think about, but at my age, I really don't have to survive too long before nature takes that out of my hands. lol
 

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I think "preppers" are idiots.

Who was that peanut who sailed in the south Atlantic ocean for 1,000 days? Remember theres no hurricanes/cyclones in the south Atlantic. You can just drift a bit north or south depending on the season.

:2 boat:
Ahh memories. The guy's name was Reid Stowe. I planned to be part of the flotilla the accompanied his boat back into New York Harbor after he returned from his 1000 Days at Sea stunt. It sounded like fun and something to do with my boat. I anchored off of Sandy Hook where Reid checked in a few days before. Unfortunately, it was not to be. My anchor windlass broke as the winds picked up to 20 knots and I had to pull it in by hand took me almost an hour. Missed the rendezvous with the other boats. The winds by then had also reached near gale conditions as a line snagged on my solar panel frame and threatened to dump them over the side. It was not really a fun day:
https://biankablog.blogspot.com/2010/06/so-much-for-that.html
 

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There was a time when whalers and others spent 3 years or more at sea w/o any of those mod cons you mentioned......
If that's the standard, which exceeds conditions ashore, I get it. That would need to be one serious destruction of society. These pandemics are very unlikely to rise to that level. You can avoid infection, by simply not coming in contact with other people. That can be done ashore, as easily as at sea, and retain refrigeration and fresh water. All you need to do is stock up the chow.

I just realized how many people I know who are dependent on pharmaceuticals. One is thyroid replacement, others are cardiac disease, etc. Some are depression meds. None of these folks are going to survive offshore for long.
 

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I don't think it's going to come to this



The The 1918 influenza pandemic killed 50 million worldwide, and 675,000 in the US when there was a world war and no real treatment.

Society didn't break down. You didn't have to live on your boat.

The best defense is hand washing, limiting personal contact (if the infection rate spikes locally) and access to first world medical treatment.

Here's hoping no SailNetters have affected family members.
 

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I just realized how many people I know who are dependent on pharmaceuticals. One is thyroid replacement, others are cardiac disease, etc. Some are depression meds. None of these folks are going to survive offshore for long.

Non will survive CoronaVirus. It targets those with an underlying problem. Anyone with heightened ACE2... Diabetics etc.

Bring at sea would be perfect. No stress and getting fit on a seafood diet. Perfect for many modern people.
 

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Non will survive CoronaVirus. It targets those with an underlying problem. Anyone with heightened ACE2... Diabetics etc.

Bring at sea would be perfect. No stress and getting fit on a seafood diet. Perfect for many modern people.
That's a bit of a slurry of misinformation. First, the virus doesn't target anyone. You have to come in physical contact with the infected sputum from another and touch it to your eye, nose or mouth. For that matter, I've heard between 10 and 30 percent of those infected, will not have symptoms or very mild ones.

The mortality rate increases for those with heart, lung or diabetic diseases, just like the regular flu, but they aren't targeted and it's not a guaranteed death sentence, with access to quality medical care.

All I'm trying to say is that one can self isolate in their home, with internet access, fresh water, comfy bed, unlimited showers and can eat all the fish they like and not get the disease. Isolation is isolation. There's really no need to do this at sea, if one is inclined to isolate, but that would be viable too.
 

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Agreed. The data from the first 45k or so confirmed infections in China showed that the average mortality rate with comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, COPD etc.. was around 7%. The mortality rate for those without comorbidities was 0.9%. While these numbers were preliminary and vary from country to country and depend upon response time for treatment, catching the virus with a comorbidity is hardly a death sentence.
 

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I don't think it's going to come to this



The The 1918 influenza pandemic killed 50 million worldwide, and 675,000 in the US when there was a world war and no real treatment.

Society didn't break down. You didn't have to live on your boat.

The best defense is hand washing, limiting personal contact (if the infection rate spikes locally) and access to first world medical treatment.

Here's hoping no SailNetters have affected family members.
There are actually Spanish Influenza graves on the East End of St. John, V.I., about as far as you could get from anything in 1918. A friend's great aunt is one of those who died as a child. Right next to where VI's Snack Shack used to be. With only a donkey path between there and Cruz Bay, it had to come in by water to Coral Bay.
 

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The 1918 flu in an era with no air travel and areas that were very isolated spread around the world in a matter of months. Probably spread by birds as there is nothing else that would account for such a rapid spread of the virus in that time.

That flu somehow got the name of Spanish flu but it probably originated in Kansas/Iowa area in US Midwest.
 

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Back to buggin' out. My boat (Tartan 37) will be ready to rock. I guess I haven't done a refit in about 10 years. Damn extras are going to cost an arm and a leg. New battery bank(s), vane steering, refrigeration, watermaker, AIS, Honda 2200EUi. Hell, the new Muir 1250 capstan windlass with 150' of 5/16ths GR chain run me most of my left arm at wholesale. And then on to installations. Looks like better part of summer will be spoilt in the yard.

This was planned anyway on our move back to the Virgin Islands to base out of. Even got our old rental house back on Northside STT after almost 10 years gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
I guess when I posted this people where calling my paranoid and crazy. Fast forward a little bit and I am not looking so crazy now..... Stay safe people looks like things are only going to get worst not better. If it gets bad enough that people start breaking into houses and fighting for resources it might be a good time to head out to sea. People are losing jobs, resources are getting scooped up at the grocery stores, global economic recession etc. a few more months of this and I thing we are in for a great awakening. Good luck to you all.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Do you still think prepares are idiots ? I have been reading stories like in Australia some lady pulled a knife on a guy over toilet paper at a store. If stuff continues people are going to keep acting like idiots.. meanwhile a prepare with means is already supplied and ready to bug out... That sounds pretty smart...


I think "preppers" are idiots.

However, a boat is the best way to save oneself from many types of Armageddon.

Why?

Its a floating, moving, toolbox and store shed.

At a moments notice you can go to sea for several YEARS, never touch land, never hit a hurricane, never see another person whilst feeding yourself with your fishing rod. Who was that peanut who sailed in the south Atlantic ocean for 1,000 days? Remember theres no hurricanes/cyclones in the south Atlantic. You can just drift a bit north or south depending on the season.

After some time at sea when you think its safer, you can go find an isolated island, yes theres some in the Caribbean, but theres more in the Pacific. You can have some sand and still stay away from the majority of people.

Theres no land based version of this mobile toolbox and storage shed where you can easily remove yourself safely from people, infections, gun toting loonies in a broken down civilisation.

But a 40 foot boat... ahhhh stock it as for a normal cruise, add some extras, tarps to catch water, fish hooks, books and tins of bully-beef, Vegemite and dry pasta. Self sufficient for decades. You don't need to sail fast, hell you could just hove to... 2 knots gets you where you need to be for the seasons.

:2 boat:
 
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