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Discussion Starter #41
If that's the standard, which exceeds conditions ashore, I get it. That would need to be one serious destruction of society. These pandemics are very unlikely to rise to that level. You can avoid infection, by simply not coming in contact with other people. That can be done ashore, as easily as at sea, and retain refrigeration and fresh water. All you need to do is stock up the chow.

I just realized how many people I know who are dependent on pharmaceuticals. One is thyroid replacement, others are cardiac disease, etc. Some are depression meds. None of these folks are going to survive offshore for long.
Not worried about the pandemic getting bad I have reserves of water and food for some months problem is people loosing jobs and acting a fool when resources get low. In America we have 3 guns per citizen when all those people start getting desperate it can be a recipe for disaster.

:2 boat::ship-captain:
 

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While I still think one can as easily hunker down in their land home, as on their boat, I do worry about looting, if this become protracted. Many communities have already enacted curfews and I think we're heading for a more substantial shut down.

I know several who've been saying they'd feel safer just being further than swimming distance from shore. Ironically, that isn't very far here right now, with water temps in the 40s.

However, I still think there is a balance. If someone does make it to you in a small boat, you are trapped. You have no way to escape and help will have a much harder time getting to you. Good old fashioned piracy.

The one thing I like is that our boat is fully paid for and represent housing, if there were a huge problem. One I do not think we'll have. It's just a comforting feeling to know there is a place to live in the short term, if necessary. Of course, I need to get her splash next week, as scheduled. I hope the marina stays open to do it.

No rights and wrongs here. Just thoughts.
 

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I got to thinking about how long we've even had toilet paper. It was first distributed in the mid-1800s. I then read the competitive advantage in the early 1900s, was making toilet paper that was "splinter free". This hasn't been a thing for very long.

People are crazy. Maybe, after all the vitriol that's become commonplace in society, everyone will have a little better perspective, on the other side, over how good everyone really has it these days. People in poverty have cell phones, but now we're concerned over toilet paper and access to medical services for everyone.

Maybe we all needed to come down to earth.
 

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I got to thinking about how long we've even had toilet paper. It was first distributed in the mid-1800s. I then read the competitive advantage in the early 1900s, was making toilet paper that was "splinter free". This hasn't been a thing for very long.

People are crazy. Maybe, after all the vitriol that's become commonplace in society, everyone will have a little better perspective, on the other side, over how good everyone really has it these days. People in poverty have cell phones, but now we're concerned over toilet paper and access to medical services for everyone.

Maybe we all needed to come down to earth.
I remember travelling in Europe as a kid and my mom griping that toilet paper wasn't available in many places. She would hoard the stuff, taking a suitcase full as one of our bags. I mainly remember because that was the bag I was assigned as it wasn't heavy for it's size.
 

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I remember travelling in Europe as a kid and my mom griping that toilet paper wasn't available in many places. She would hoard the stuff, taking a suitcase full as one of our bags. I mainly remember because that was the bag I was assigned as it wasn't heavy for it's size.
Anyone at all interested in the history of cities in this country should check out the Tenement Museum in NYC. A wonderful time capsule of what life was like for city residents in the early 1900's. This building (near China Town and Little Italy) was basically locked up in the 1950's and left (except for the ground floor restaurants/bars) untouched. The building has been partially renovated to show how residents lived during different time periods. One of the floors has a (communal) toilet room. There, hanging on the wall next to the toilet, is a "pad" of cut up squares of magazine and newspaper pages. Obviously that time period's version of toilet paper.

Let's hope it doesn't come to that....
 

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Anyone at all interested in the history of cities in this country should check out the Tenement Museum in NYC. A wonderful time capsule of what life was like for city residents in the early 1900's. This building (near China Town and Little Italy) was basically locked up in the 1950's and left (except for the ground floor restaurants/bars) untouched. The building has been partially renovated to show how residents lived during different time periods. One of the floors has a (communal) toilet room. There, hanging on the wall next to the toilet, is a "pad" of cut up squares of magazine and newspaper pages. Obviously that time period's version of toilet paper.

Let's hope it doesn't come to that....
I grew up poor. That's what we had. Until we moved to a nearby town I did not know there was anything else to use for the purpose but last week's newspaper.
 

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.....There, hanging on the wall next to the toilet, is a "pad" of cut up squares of magazine and newspaper pages. Obviously that time period's version of toilet paper........
Too rich a setup to not think about which newpapers and magazines are best suited as toilet paper. :)

I'll stay apolitical and nominate Powerboat mag. :)
 

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Outhouses were common in public areas in the farming area that I grew up in. Most were stocked with the Sears Catalogue. Was it the demise of the outhouse that was the end of Sears?? When I started at my one room school in 1950 they'd just gotten indoor plumbing and a forced air heating system to replace the outhouse and wood burning Potbelly stove. Our class of 3 1st graders was the first to go through the 8 grades with nothing to read in the bathroom.
 

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I got to thinking about how long we've even had toilet paper. It was first distributed in the mid-1800s. I then read the competitive advantage in the early 1900s, was making toilet paper that was "splinter free". This hasn't been a thing for very long.
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Funny you should ask:
 

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Exactly. I went to the supermarket yesterday to buy beer and some idiot was stockpiling 1000 rice a roni packets. The world is not going to end.

Even if this went totally unchecked and ran through the entire population, herd immunity would eventually shut it off. Like zika.
 

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However, some of us are at the very end of a long and fragile supply chain and feel a little stocking up is in order. I've stocked up for transoceanic voyages before and I think of this as much the same thing.
 

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Fragile supply line.

One reason why like Dominica, they grow their own food. Robust local supply, including water.

God knows how long this will last.
 

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...some idiot was stockpiling 1000 rice a roni packets. The world is not going to end.....
It is, if one eats that much processed food.

It's funny, I've been stocking the house, like I would stock the boat for a cruise/passage. Lots of staples and most fresh foods are long shelf lived. Cauliflower, Apples, Potatoes, etc. Big difference is the size of my home freezer.

On the other hand, there is definitely a cry out there that is threatening the destabilization of society. Some saying everyone will get sick and millions will die. People are being told by some to be afraid, they aren't making it up themselves.

We need a more balanced rhetoric, but doubt it will happen until it's over.
 

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I kind of doubt many of us here will freak out. However.....I’m seeing some bad reactions in the general public. I know some seniors who are not taking this seriously enough.

And I’m see a bunch who are just playing political football.

I was wondering how this is going to effect international food shipments so I was poking around for that. I didn’t find a lot except there seems to be some panic and hoarding in the U.K. But no one talking about subsistence grain movement s to places like Ethiopia and Yemen.

Iran seems to be coming apart. A power struggle between the civil and religious power structures has developed. Thousands protesting the closure of shrines.

Hardly a word from India, one wonders what is going on there.

And Saudi Arabia is going through some interesting times for sure. 100% dependent on outside food and in an oil price war. Ouch!

I think the largest single danger to large clusters is food hoarding or non shipment to at risk populations.

Stateside and Europe we will loose some older folks, maybe even me. But life will go on.
 

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Captain Obvious
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It is, if one eats that much processed food.

It's funny, I've been stocking the house, like I would stock the boat for a cruise/passage. Lots of staples and most fresh foods are long shelf lived. Cauliflower, Apples, Potatoes, etc. Big difference is the size of my home freezer.

On the other hand, there is definitely a cry out there that is threatening the destabilization of society. Some saying everyone will get sick and millions will die. People are being told by some to be afraid, they aren't making it up themselves.

We need a more balanced rhetoric, but doubt it will happen until it's over.
I look at it as a response from people who cannot think critically. The governor of NY is on the TV every day begging the feds to build or retrofit health care facilities. He is worried about the hospital capacity. Not the supermarket capacity. He is not begging the feds for supermarkets. Worst case scenario if we did nothing ;there would still be plenty of immune people to harvest and process food and to distribute it. There isn't any scenario that has the supermarkets shut down.

I'm with you on collecting nice foods such as fruits and vegetables. I'm well stocked myself but not because I think the supermarket will become a death zone.

The guy in front of me on line was clearly irrationally panicked about food. He can't think so he is hoarding. In my book, that failing both moral and intellectual is 100% on him.

And I saw a chart showing how China crushed this outbreak in one month. From wildly escalating to almost no new cases between about Feb 20 and present. I will dig it up. If we fail to stamp it out quickly, heads should roll.
 

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Iran seems to be coming apart. A power struggle between the civil and religious power structures has developed. Thousands protesting the closure of shrines.

Hardly a word from India, one wonders what is going on there.

And Saudi Arabia is going through some interesting times for sure. 100% dependent on outside food and in an oil price war. Ouch!
Very quiet in Africa too. Wonder if it's because the use of anti-Malaria drugs in that continent over the years has been having a somewhat prophylactic effect to the Virus.
 

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Very quiet in Africa too. Wonder if it's because the use of anti-Malaria drugs in that continent over the years has been having a somewhat prophylactic effect to the Virus.

Perhaps 2 things... Its still warm there so less flu generally. Yes, the cholorquine does not work for all strains of Malaria but I think it still works as a treatment for some strains.... but more importantly, as you say, the prophylactic effect.

From the actual human testing being done in many countries (as disputed on Sailnet :| ) there seems to be a good chance that chloroquine and/or an AIDS drug will be a successful treatment.

One reason for hoping chloroquine is good is there must be large stockpiles of it in the worlds militaries that have operated in the tropics... the USA, Australia, France... and of course, Africa. Its also cheap as chips.

Not only that, some cruising boats have chloroquine in their med kit!!!!!!! Some friends of mine searched theres... and presto! Enough to get them throu a bout.

Chloroquine is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the safest and most effective medicines needed in a health system.[6] It is available as a generic medication.[1] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$0.04.[7] In the United States, it costs about US$5.30 per dose.[1]
Shouldn't the time frame of roll-out of this drug be so short?

Wouldn't it be terrific is suck a cheap drug would work until an vaccine is found!


https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/coronavirus-australia-queensland-researchers-find-cure-want-drug-trial/news-story/93e7656da0cff4fc4d2c5e51706accb5

Theres a similar drug being tested too... hydroxychloroquine was more potent than chloroquine, with a more tolerable safety profile, "The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$4.65 per month as of 2015, when used for rheumatoid arthritis or lupus.[6] In the United States the wholesale cost of a month of treatment is about US$25 as of 2020.[7] In the United Kingdom this dose costs the NHS about £ 5.15.[8] In 2017, it was the 128th most prescribed medication in the United States with more than five million prescriptions.[9]"
 
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