SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I finished ASA 101 and fell in love with sailing here on the Ches Bay. I wanted to buy a small boat that had a main and jib that I could launch directly from the beach and not a dock. I also wanted a boat I could launch and sail by myself if no one else was around to sail.
SO I bought a used Vanguard 15 from a local college as they retire them from their racing fleet periodically.
We got it to the beach on the dolly and rolled it to the beach, launched it, immediately tipped it as we tried to figure out how to get the dagger board in, rudder down AND then jump into the boat from chest deep water with small waves with SW winds at about 10 knots. Luckily I was with an experience sailor so we righted the boat and off we went.
Not a bad maiden voyage but then comes the problem....I cannot get the boat to the waters edge alone with or without the dolly. The hull with the mast is about 250 lbs and I weigh about 120 lbs.
I know that a catamaran is my best choice for a beach launch sailboat but I do not want a trampoline but a monohull and nothing over 15 ft. Does anyone have any suggestions on a great small monohull with mail and jib that I can launch from the beach alone???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
You want to be able to do it by yourself and be able to invite others. Not to have to importune others to help you do something you can't do by yourself.

Seems like three possible general options;
1. You get better technology - a lighter boat, a better dolly, a better launching spot.
2. You get better strength - squats, pushups, etc so you can muscle the situation better.
3. You get better technique - row without sails, use a small anchor, use a little ladder, etc.

Congrats on getting into sailing and having the big bay right there. Boat sounds like a fun one too. I wonder if these folks (the Vanguard 15 "Fleet Captain" has contact # listed) could help? Severn Sailing Association

Good luck.
 

·
Owl
Joined
·
295 Posts
Is the beach steep, or is the sand real soft? Seems like you should be able to move 250lbs across hard(ish) level(ish) sand with a good dolly. Maybe you just need different wheels?

Or some funky bicycle to tow it with.
 

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
8,625 Posts
You need to rig the boat AFTER you are afloat. any other way with the rigging up will make it difficult. Best thing is to have the rigging ready and set up so it can be raised ordropped easily.
 

·
██▓▓▒▒░&
Joined
·
13,641 Posts
Depending on conditions and assuming you want to get wet? Swim out with an anchor. Drop it. Launch & haul the boat out a bit, then raise the sails & rig it, at anchor.

Not an ideal situation but it might do. Until you get a trailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,206 Posts
a. Try a forum where people sail beach boats. Google "trailer sailor forum."
b. You need a kick-up rudder.
c. The business about rigging while afloat is nonsense. There are many beach launched boats that tolerate rigging on the sand.
d. Reconsider a small cat or a Laser. They are popular for good reasons.
e. Hang around beaches where people surf launch. See what they've got.

I used a to beach launch a Prindle 18 back when I was 150 pounds. Piece of cake with good fat wheels and good tech. Raising the mast was to only challenge (I built a winch for that).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think you are right about different wheels on the dolly. I will try the inflatable wheels used on the beach carts around here this weekend. Hurricane Aurthur hit the coast giving us 5 feet waves in the bay but winds turn to the SW tmrw so I will try the launch with better wheels on the dolly!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I do have a kick up rudder and I think the fat wheels idea is what I need to try next. I have to agree that rigging it up after its in the water isn't necessary because I have no problem rigging the sails up on the beach. My brother has a Prindle and we took it out today on the bay as the wind was still whipping from the NE as the remnants of hurricane aurthur left and that was fun but still not a big fan of the tramp. I saw a Force 5 today on the beach so I am going to find the owner of that one and talk to them a bit as well. Thanks for your advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I guess I could try that but the sails really aren't the problem. I can rig the sails on the beach but the getting the actual boat to the water is tough and then getting the center board in before I jump in bc that is what keeps it stable so I don't tip it hauling myself up into the boat. I guess I need to try fatter wheels on my dolly this weekend as some have suggested and a better technique of hauling myself up without tipping it which I guess just takes practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
I guess I could try that but the sails really aren't the problem. I can rig the sails on the beach but the getting the actual boat to the water is tough and then getting the center board in before I jump in bc that is what keeps it stable so I don't tip it hauling myself up into the boat. I guess I need to try fatter wheels on my dolly this weekend as some have suggested and a better technique of hauling myself up without tipping it which I guess just takes practice.
Actually the centerboard is generally used to create lift. It does offer some stabilizing effect but crew weight and placement is that ballast that keeps the boat upright. So with a little practice you will be hoping in and out with zero worries of tipping. Keep your weight centered and low when you don't need to counteract the force on the sails. Think about it as a huge stable windsurfer or the obvious its like riding a bike. When you first learn it is impossibly difficult and unstable but soon it is like riding a bike or Vanguard 15 if you will. Have fun. Justin
 

·
Owl
Joined
·
295 Posts
As waterrat says, keep your weight centered and low. You are coming up over the stern, not over the side, right? So find a way to do it smooothly. No jumping. Think slither, not climb. It might help to rig a line (from... somewhere. The base of the mast?) with a couple of loops in it to hang over the edge as a foot/hand hold. And don't put the centerboard down right away, so you can keep the boat in shallower water and won't have as far to get up into it.
 

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
8,625 Posts
wow.. all this effort to keep a boat upright..

If you rig the boat before it's on the water, even the slightest wind will take her over. strap it to a dolly.. even a wide dolly.. it will take the dolly over with it. This boat

Is not a keel boat. the center board does NOT keep it upright. it's designed for racing and the crew is the ballast. Just the weight of the mast is almost enough to take her over. Not much you can to to keep it upright when launching while rigged. Best to learn how to use your body weight to right it because you will be getting wet allot with such a boat. That's the fun of it too!

Rig when afloat. end of story.
 

·
Water Lover
Joined
·
773 Posts
It might be that some folks are not obviously clear enough on the difference between rigging (rudder attached in up position, sail bent on, center board maybe poised to go down with something holding it up in the cb trunk) and raising sail. Raising sail is the final step that doesn't work so well for many solo dinghies until you're in the water and then aboard. The rigging should mostly be able to be done on the beach.
 

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
We used to launch a Mirror dinghy from the beach all the time, sails lowered, centreboard in the slot ready to push down, rudder raised. Push out to about mid-thigh depth (if that), push off and slither over the side. Centreboard and rudder down asap, sails up, away you go.
 

·
Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
Joined
·
4,525 Posts
Seems like you might be making it a bit complicated for yourself wanting a main and jib and wanting to sail by yourself - especially as a new sailor. What about a Laser Radial? It is a Laser hull but with a smaller rig that is better suited for your weight. A regular Laser is better if you are around 160 lbs. Laser radials are often raced, you probably could pick up one that is not suited for serious racing but fine for having fun and learning on. Same idea for launching with a dolly but much lighter boat and fewer strings to worry about.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top