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"Sawzall will work on rigging too"
If you want to bash stuff up that's a great idea. But sailboat rigging UNBOLTS so all you need to clear it, is a wrench. And the job is done cleanly.
Then you pull the mast, in one piece, and sell it. Again no Sawzall, unless your goal is just to bash stuff up and make a noisy mess.
 

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If I was to remove the mast (remove, not destroy), I would install a fairly large water tank to balance the keel, somewhere on top of the cabin. You can always use more water. Keep the draft to 4 ft or less. If you are not in a hurry, it will be a fun trip. Wait for good weather to cross long stretches of open water or you will puke your guts out.
 

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No, it operates marginally in either setup. The Mac is the "spork" of boats. It does everything mediocre, and nothing very well.

Your definition of "perfect" is merely that it is capable of motoring and sailing at all. Yes, I've sailed aboard the Mac. I've also sailed rings around two of them in my Pearson 30. If you had any sailing experience, you'd know that although it sails, it doesn't sail all that well.

I'm not really sure what your point is here. You've made your decision, you're not looking for advice. You're looking for validation. Do whatever you like, but don't look at us for validation. Really, all you're seeking is a free beer-drinking platform on the water.

Your decision to turn a screwdriver into a hammer instead of just buying a hammer is your business. Good luck with that.
Just being an angry sailor? or an ass it seems to me!
The Mac meets his needs and allows him to later sail if he chooses to.
Wasn't that the real point of his needs?
Not stepping into this industry and be popeye from day one, but having a chance to get out on the water, do his thing, and then if he chooses to, begin sailing. He can achieve his goals with a Mac easier than with any other sailboat out there.
You must be stuck in your ways really deep. Sad to be your son I'd say.
Doc
 

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I'm new to this forum. Am planning to purchase a used 30' sailboat but I'm not interested in sailing. I would like to remove the mast except for about 8 feet for antenna mounting. Would like to do the great loop and not have to worry about a mast, also very economical cruising. Would removing the mast as described have any ill effects on the vessel?? Thanks Al.
Al-
Check out the ECO-Trawler (green hull) on D-Dock at the Manitowoc Marina. It may meet your needs better than a sailboat.
-CH
 

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Just go under a low bridge, that will remove the mast.
Took 4.5 feet off the mast of the supply boat I was operating... Had a mate who (according to him), knew every thing about the area water ways around Morgan City La. He didn't.... went under the first two bridges without a problem That last bridge is what did me in...
Morale of the story!? Don't trust anyone who tells a good line about knowing it all.
 

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Just go under a low bridge, that will remove the mast.
Took 4.5 feet off the mast of the supply boat I was operating... Had a mate who (according to him), knew every thing about the area water ways around Morgan City La. He didn't.... went under the first two bridges without a problem That last bridge is what did me in...
Morale of the story!? Don't trust anyone who tells a good line about knowing it all.
Nice part of the world, Morgan City, LA. I had a towing company from north Fla, send me there on a pointy bow tug drawing 10 feet and a barge around 300'. Only charts aboard were for the entry through the lock. No cables aboard, no winches fwd and no room in the lock to hip up.Came spinning outa the lock like a tether ball around the pole. And some folks think yachting is fun!
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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I too am curious what peoples burn rates really are. I know thats not the point of sailing, but some of you guys must keep track?
I average around 9.5 NM/gal. diesel. 35' full keel, Yanmar 3GM30F. 29 Hp. Hull speed is 6.4 knots. I usually run at 2600-2800 RPM.
 

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Water Lover
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The Macgregor bashers risk sounding a bit silly or uninformed if they assume ALL Macs sail the same. There was quite a lot of design variation throughout the Venture-Mac build history.
 

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First of all running around at sea with no mast is no problem ON THE GREAT LOOP! Sure when you get an ocean swell causing the boat to roll the roll will period will be less due to the loss of pendulum weight. How often will that be.

10 ft mast say an old windsurfer mast will do just fine and can be left unstayed and dropped easily if required.

A sailboat will be more economical than a trawler.

One thing I might do is add some pitch to the prop to get closer to cruising speed at max torque as fuel burn will be reduced.

Seems a reasonable idea and maybe the mast etc could be sold?
 

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Geeeze another OLD POST dug up...
 

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Wow. I've been thinking of doing something similar to the OP and read this entire thread with interest. What a waste of time, as most were just critical off-topic replies which wouldn't be much help to the OP. Wherever you are, OP, I hope you are enjoying your boat. :)

I've wondered about the feasibility of purchasing a 32'-38' sailing catamaran and removing the mast and sails to sell (hopefully offset the purchase cost somewhat). Even used power cats are always so expensive but more older sailing cats to be found more reasonably priced. I realize that power cats have different hulls but the sailing cat sans sails should still be pretty darn efficient and loads of room for a liveaboard. If one could repower up a bit to have a frankenstein trawler cat that would be efficient at low speed (trawler-like gph) but have some 'umph' when you needed/wished to go faster, too. A poor man's power catamaran, so to speak. I wish I knew where to find info on doing something like that. Anyone know of a blog of resource of anyone that has done that or documented attempting?

The OP is gone, I think, so feel free to bash me now instead. :laugher Thanks.
 

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should think canal boat instead of repurposed sailboat
Wow. More of the same. Thanks a bunch.

Never mind. I found another forum about converting sail cats to power cats was being discussed. And people actually read before replying! I marvel!! Bye.
 

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Wow. I've been thinking of doing something similar to the OP and read this entire thread with interest. What a waste of time, as most were just critical off-topic replies which wouldn't be much help to the OP. Wherever you are, OP, I hope you are enjoying your boat. :)

I've wondered about the feasibility of purchasing a 32'-38' sailing catamaran and removing the mast and sails to sell (hopefully offset the purchase cost somewhat). Even used power cats are always so expensive but more older sailing cats to be found more reasonably priced. I realize that power cats have different hulls but the sailing cat sans sails should still be pretty darn efficient and loads of room for a liveaboard. If one could repower up a bit to have a frankenstein trawler cat that would be efficient at low speed (trawler-like gph) but have some 'umph' when you needed/wished to go faster, too. A poor man's power catamaran, so to speak. I wish I knew where to find info on doing something like that. Anyone know of a blog of resource of anyone that has done that or documented attempting?

The OP is gone, I think, so feel free to bash me now instead. :laugher Thanks.
:batter:hammer:clobber feel better now? :)

You have MY permission:chainsaw to do what you will with any boat you wish to make into a power boat. :D

It is feasible and very affordable until you try to make them go fast. Most sailboats, even cats have "displacement" type hulls and tend to build dam like wake as they are pushed beyond the theoretical hull speed. Applying more power beyond that makes them churn the water and actually ride lower in their own wake even go slower.

You could get lucky and find some that will plane like some of the high end racing sailboats. but I'm really not an expert on all this. There are some very well qualified naval engineer/ architects here on the forum that could help on that.

I don't think you find much about making sail into power because it's all a very low tech way to make a power boat. Purists won't be much help. Motor sailers, even some trawlers have sails to compliment the power of the vessel, and to not have that available is a real loss in the vessel's actual design. Power boats do go better with power; Just the way things have evolved in boat design. Sails and wind pressure (there is a formula) can be converted to horsepower AND it's amazing how much power sails really do develop! It's way way beyond what just a motor can do because "lift" is also part of the equation.

"motor sailing" (Usually jib deployed and motor running) a method many of us use to make way in good time. This can't be done if the "new" boat is without sails, end result; it will motor slower then if it were "motor sailing"

This "make a sail boat a power boat" really is nothing new as some people just never bothered to raise the mast and or sails.

ps I only really read what you just posted.
 

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I guess this is how it goes. I want to do something stupid, but if you think its stupid, you're stupid.
 

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I love it; "If one could repower up a bit to have a frankenstein trawler cat that would be efficient at low speed (trawler-like gph) but have some 'umph' when you needed/wished to go faster, too."
Yeah, that's the poor man's way, let's just repower! A couple of BIGGER diesels will probably need bigger shafts, different screws and perhaps even struts.
Never mind that most cats have very narrow engine spaces, and oh, I guess we will need to reinforce the engine beds for the greater horsepower. Of course, adding a few hundred pounds to the stern of any boat, let alone a cat, should really improve performance as well, wouldn't you think?
Repowering with bigger engines to go slow is like buying a shrimp trawler or a tug boat to make long distance voyages; it is never economical.
I love how some people will come on here with a rather impractical idea and abuse those who have a pretty good idea of that impracticality, ignoring some pretty good advice. If I had a buck.......
 

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I know this is an old thread -- but it is a ongoing question.

I wouldn't buy a sailboat to use permanently as a non-sailboat for reasons others have mentioned.

But for purposely of doing the Great Loop (mentioned in the OP) only, I see some logic to removing the mast for the trip.

I have not done the Great Loop, but when I took a sailboat up the ICW a few years back, the "sail" part of the boat was not an advantage. There were very few places that were actually practical to sail in, and having a mast meant innumerable times waiting for bridges to open. Most of the times we just motored, and waited for bridges.

There were few area where we had to navigate any kind of signficant wave action, Albermarle Sound comes to mind, and Chasapeake Bay. But mostly the biggest problem with waves were from other boats.

Except for the Great Lakes, it seems that most of the rest of the Great Loop is probably in the same category. I'm guessing you're probably not going to be actually sailing much. And to go thru the Eire locks and Chicago, you've got to take down the mast and put it back up, twice.

We are planning a Great Loop trip on a sailboat in a couple years, and I'm thinking of leaving my mast at a yard in one of the Okeechobee storage places. No waiting on bridges, and the costs of the extra fuel needed for areas I could actually sail would probably be less than the costs of unstepping and stepping the mast a couple times. And we don't have to deal with the mast laying on our deck and hanging over the ends for half the trip.

For sailors who have actually done the Great Loop, I'd appreciate your views. Did you do a lot of actual sailing on the trip?
 

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This somewhat depends on the boat in question and on you. I don't have experience making the loop but I have a little experience on boats without their masts. There have been a few times when I have had to move a sailboat without a mast. In one case, after my Folkboat lost its mast, and another bringing an approximately 40 foot boat to Direcktors to get a new mast when I worked there in the 1970's. In both cases the motion on these boats was so violent that even moving safely around the decks was very difficult. Power boat wakes (we were in the Intercoastal Waterway) were shocking events that made standing almost impossible and moving about the cabin quite dangerous.

But what I am not sure about is whether these were a unique experiences or typical. I have never been sure whether there was something about these specific boats that resulted in the experiences that I had. I have purposely asked people who have motored with their masts on their deck whether they have noticed a different motion. All say that they have and most said that it was bearable. I don't know how much worse not having a mast aboard would be from there.

So, in my mind the answer would seem to lie in the specifics of the boat and your tolerance for uncomfortable motion. If I was considering doing something like that, I would have the mast removed and put on the dock, and then go out in snotty weather or a busy weekend and see whether I was comfortable or not. If I was marginally comfortable, I would then add some ballast to get the boat to sit on her lines, (or down in the bow a little since you are motoring and most boats squat when they are motoring) and go out and try that again, and see how that felt.

If it was acceptable to you, you have your answer. If its not acceptable to you, then you had planned to have the mast removed for the trip anyway, and at that point, I would build a cradle to support the mast on deck and try that to see if that is any more comfortable. If that was not bearable, do some maintenance on your mast and then put it back up and look for other options.

But frankly, if it were me, as others have suggested, you probably would be way ahead of the game buying a small trawler yacht, make the trip, and then selling her when you got back. The depreciation on the trawler should not be all that much worse than having to rebuild the engine on your sailboat after putting a couple thousand hours on it, and the shallower draft and larger accommodations would make the trip more comfortable.

Jeff
 
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Thanks Jeff, sound advice.

Our boat is a PDQ 32 cat, so the rolling should not an issue. That it might make more sense to buy and sell a trawler versus putting a thousand or so hours on the engines is an interesting proposition I'll have to mull a bit.
 
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