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Fantastic! It would be so rewarding to build a sailboat from scratch and make it actually sail. If it went upwind I would be ecstatic. I'm not talking about 100000 hours of work with white oak and dacron, but what you are doing. Fashioning a boat with basically found objects and no sewing machine is just amazingly cool.

Like, I said, I'm sure I could get one to go downwind, but being able to point even 1 degree upwind would be so rewarding because then you are just over the threshold of being able to harness/control the wind for travel.

Can you hot glue some thin strips of wood to the poly to act as battens/stiffeners?
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Interesting idea re the sail stiffeners.

My plan is to use the polytarp sail to test the rig. I patterned the rig directly off an opti rig, so if I am happy with the performance, I may just buy a dacron Optimist rig from intensity sails ($89).

Today I designed the mast partner and mast step. My shopping list is; 2x6x12 hemlock board, 4 x bolts, nuts and washers. And either West System Gflex 650 or 3M 5200 to glue the mast step into the bilge.

Any thoughts on 5200 vs Gflex 650 for adhesion to aluminum? Force on the mast step will be minimal, mostly just compression as the mast partner (bolted to the gunwale) takes most of the sailing loads.

By the way, mast sep and partner material cost will be $35-40, bringing total material cost to ~$57. I figure if I spend another $40 on leeboards, I will be sailing for $100. Not bad. If I go with a dacron Opti Sail, I am still under $250.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Progress continues.

I was able to dry fit mast partner and mast step today. Both still need finished with varnish and some aesthetic contouring but I wanted to test their fit before getting into that.

Both came from a 2 x 8 x 12 piece of rough lumber.

Mast partner was first cut to a manageable length with my chain saw, then trimmed to a snug fit using first band saw then electric hand plane. The square hole was hollowed out using drill and sabre saw.

Mast step was cut on band saw then hollowed out to a depth of approximately 1" using tip of chainsaw and chisel.
 

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What is the weight of the mast

One concern would be what these different will do when the canoe is dumped...forces...how they will want to move
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Mast is prety light. Guessing 12 or 13 pounds. Nicely tapered too so most weight is down low. Even mast head sheave is wood. Mast should provide some buoyancy in a capsize, maybe inhibit turtling. Won't know until I try :)
 

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Nice work Arcb. About 60 years ago my brother made a canvas on wood rib 40'' x 16' canoe... the plans came from a Popular Mechanics magazine. After paddling around on the Detroit River several times (we grew up in Windsor) he decided that a sail would be a good idea. He fashioned the spars from odd lumber and the sail cloth came from the stage curtain at the church that we cleaned for spending money, the curtain had been replaced with a new one. Lee boards were added. It really did sail quite well as far as I can remember and he never did dump it...a bit surprising maybe as the Detroit River could be challenging with the boat and freighter traffic. I'm not being very helpful but your project brought back fond memories.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Mast float is a neat idea. Problem with open sailing canoes is they swamp when they dump.

I have been advised the best way to avoid a swamping in a dump is inflatable side air bags.

They are about half way down this page. These ones come from the UK £70 for a set.

Accessories
 

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A couple of pics. Just about ready for sea trials. Not bad for a week of evenings with a chain saw, scrap lumber, a tarp and a 5 year old assistant ship wright.
Looks good. Love to see it in action.

You probably already covered this, but what are you using for a dagger board?
 

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
Good question mike, and I haven't covered it yet.

I haven't decided. I think I will go with a single lee board.

The lee board itself should be fairly straightforward. I have a Michael Storer design for the board itself which I will likely go with. Michael Storer is a well respected australian wooden boat designer with succesful designs including the Goat Island Skiff and the Voila Sailing Canoe. So, I am confident the board will do what I want it to do.

The tricky part is the leeboard bracket. I am thinking a wood block of Canadian maple bolted down to the mast partner. Drill a hole through the mast partner and use a large suze carraige bolt with big washers to allow the board to rotate? Not sure, have to design it and build it to see if it will work.

Simple drawing.
 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
I have heard sailing canoes refferred to as organic boats because of their tendency towards evolution.

I have redesigned my mainsail after having difficulty getting the sail to set properly. I chopped 18 inches off the peak, built a pocket luff and a pocket for the sprit boom. I have gone to a shorter lighter mast and gone to a loose footed sail. I have "sailed" the boat in my yard in this configuration and I am satisfied I can sail her.

I also added a kayak sail as a head sail. The result being a cat schooner rig of approximately 37 sq ft.

I hope to test her out this week end. Down wind only as I have yet to design a lee board.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I think I will go with outriggers. I am reviewing the commercially available options and weighing the pros and cons of buying vs building. Might go with inflatable amas with an aluminum cross bar. The cross bar can double as a convenient mounting point for a pivoting lee board.
 

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I think I will go with outriggers. I am reviewing the commercially available options and weighing the pros and cons of buying vs building. Might go with inflatable amas with an aluminum cross bar. The cross bar can double as a convenient mounting point for a pivoting lee board.
Having owned a Hobie Island, I definitely encourage amas. The Island's were retractable, doubt you want to go that far, but you never know do you? Also, I wonder if a small fin/dagger would be a nice feature in them. Controlling lee drift was always a battle with the Island. It would "point" up wind, but wouldn't actually go in that direction if you know what I mean.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Some 6 or 8 inch pvc pipe with a heat gun and some patience might yield something interesting
What are your thoughts here? Use the heat gun to mold the pvc pipe into a streamlined shape? I wonder how I would seal the ends? Just heat it and kind of pinch/fold the ends over?
 

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I would try shaping the front
Soften, pinch at some angle, glue it
A large vise would be the trick but could just clamp it

The length might be shaped in some kinda hinged boards thingy...heating inside the pipe...squeeze it down v shaped as able
 
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