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Case in point- Last week I got caught on the Hudson River during the Nor’ Easter that blew through. Between the strong currents and the high winds, my boat was doing 360’s in place right over the anchor. Eventually the rode caught the centerboard that’s partially hanging down and broke all kinds of parts, not to mention leaving my drifting into the middle of downtown NYC’s portion of the Hudson River amongst massive commercial traffic. So there I was in my underwear at 11pm trying to gain control of an out of control boat. A few days later the top cap of my headsail furler foil comes off, leaving the top of the foil exposed. Of course the halyard snags it and I couldn’t roll the furler in- 20 miles off of New Jersey. Two days later the mishap in the Hudson had apparently tweaked the centerboard packing gland and I suddenly found myself taking on 20 gallons a minute, at night, in commercial traffic mid way up the Delaware River. Then this morning I go to start the engine and suddenly the high temp alarm goes off. Apparently I sucked up a plastic bag in the raw water intake. While trying to figure out what was happening, standing there looking at the diesel, the breather gasket let’s go and oil starts spewing all over.........welcome to cruising. Did I fix everything? Of course. But it hasn’t been scotch and bikinis for the last two weeks. Nice sunsets though. 🤙AA
 

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Still new at it but have found the following helps.
For several years went back and forth to the Caribbean. I really like passage. Wife doesn’t. I don’t mind seeing family occasionally. Wife wants more contact. So this year for the first time left the boat in Grenada and stayed in our house for the summer. Total boat break. Other than SN no sail related activities.
We take two extended boat breaks during the winter. Xmas and spring. Total of 5 weeks off the boat. Beyond family time do at least one land trip.
So approach it as having two homes. Two divergent lifestyles.

On key things do my own work. Just don’t totally trust yards. But whereas I used to do the bottom, pull varnish, wax and do all the lesser skilled work now write check. Sure price it out and try to keep expenses down but have taken to the “you get one pass” attitude. Rather miss a few meals in restaurants, getting fancy clothes and other stuff like that than be doing grunt work.
Sure I’ll do grunt work when bored and stuck on the boat like when making water but surprisingly just cutting down on mindless maintenance work makes a huge difference in your attitude towards the boat.

Used find a spot anchor snorkel, read and hangout. Now do more land exploring, more involved cooking and non boat stuff. Also still have the smaller more difficult islands to see. And there’s charity work to do.

You need to shake it up. You need to not be unidimensional. Ben Franklin said”boredom is a sign of lack of intelligence “.
 

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On the topic of dry chem fire extinguishers. They should be turned upside down and shaken or spanked a couple times a year. The chemicals settle in the bottom and pack down over time preventing them from being expelled properly. Sounds goofy, but tis true - I worked for a fire safety service co once upon a time.
Here's an idea: Mount them horizontally on a bulkhead. Every time you tack you'll be agitating the chemicals.
 

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Way too new to the idea of sailing to know if it's different for boats, but in general. Extinguishers should inspected once a year and depending on the type expire 5-10 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #65
This is an epic story that will keep you entertained for a few hours.

https://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/77054-s-v-triumph-lost-atlantic.html

I met Doug, Interesting guy. He bought another boat even bigger after losing Triumph.

Do you remember the one where a member here signed up as crew for the Transpac, and the owner of the boat owned Chinese restaurants and had his wife and 80 or 90 year old grandmother on board. The aforementioned crew member kind of mutinyed because the owner didn’t have enough water or something. He tried calling a Navy ship to be rescued. I can’t remember all the details but it was a crazy story. At one point the owner’s wife showed up here and started defending her husband. It was a few years back but it was a contentious thread.
 

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Case in point- Last week I got caught on the Hudson River during the Nor’ Easter that blew through. Between the strong currents and the high winds, my boat was doing 360’s in place right over the anchor. Eventually the rode caught the centerboard that’s partially hanging down and broke all kinds of parts, not to mention leaving my drifting into the middle of downtown NYC’s portion of the Hudson River amongst massive commercial traffic. So there I was in my underwear at 11pm trying to gain control of an out of control boat. A few days later the top cap of my headsail furler foil comes off, leaving the top of the foil exposed. Of course the halyard snags it and I couldn’t roll the furler in- 20 miles off of New Jersey. Two days later the mishap in the Hudson had apparently tweaked the centerboard packing gland and I suddenly found myself taking on 20 gallons a minute, at night, in commercial traffic mid way up the Delaware River. Then this morning I go to start the engine and suddenly the high temp alarm goes off. Apparently I sucked up a plastic bag in the raw water intake. While trying to figure out what was happening, standing there looking at the diesel, the breather gasket let’s go and oil starts spewing all over.........welcome to cruising. Did I fix everything? Of course. But it hasn’t been scotch and bikinis for the last two weeks. Nice sunsets though. 🤙AA
We have found deploying a kellet and would have prevented a wrap around the keel or centerboard. We use it anytime there are strong reversing currents to anchor in..

Why would you have been in the channel on the Delaware?
 

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Here's an idea: Mount them horizontally on a bulkhead. Every time you tack you'll be agitating the chemicals.
That’s good to know
 

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Do you remember the one where a member here signed up as crew for the Transpac, and the owner of the boat owned Chinese restaurants and had his wife and 80 or 90 year old grandmother on board. The aforementioned crew member kind of mutinyed because the owner didn’t have enough water or something. He tried calling a Navy ship to be rescued. I can’t remember all the details but it was a crazy story. At one point the owner’s wife showed up here and started defending her husband. It was a few years back but it was a contentious thread.
The member also had a”past”. Very contentious chap

The story went that he led a mutiny and caused issues on that Transpacific Race as he thought he knew better than the captain. There was very little vetting done by both sides before they left. He basically spend the voyage criticizing the captain who had done the trip half a dozen times,
He bragged about taking Chesapeake charter boats out in high winds and practicing MOB
 
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Case in point- Last week I got caught on the Hudson River during the Nor’ Easter that blew through. Between the strong currents and the high winds, my boat was doing 360’s in place right over the anchor. Eventually the rode caught the centerboard that’s partially hanging down and broke all kinds of parts, not to mention leaving my drifting into the middle of downtown NYC’s portion of the Hudson River amongst massive commercial traffic. So there I was in my underwear at 11pm trying to gain control of an out of control boat. A few days later the top cap of my headsail furler foil comes off, leaving the top of the foil exposed. Of course the halyard snags it and I couldn’t roll the furler in- 20 miles off of New Jersey. Two days later the mishap in the Hudson had apparently tweaked the centerboard packing gland and I suddenly found myself taking on 20 gallons a minute, at night, in commercial traffic mid way up the Delaware River. Then this morning I go to start the engine and suddenly the high temp alarm goes off. Apparently I sucked up a plastic bag in the raw water intake. While trying to figure out what was happening, standing there looking at the diesel, the breather gasket let’s go and oil starts spewing all over.........welcome to cruising. Did I fix everything? Of course. But it hasn’t been scotch and bikinis for the last two weeks. Nice sunsets though. 🤙AA
We have found deploying a kellet and would have prevented a wrap around the keel or centerboard. We use it anytime there are strong reversing currents to anchor in..

Why would you have been in the channel on the Delaware?
I came in late and didn’t pay attention to the normal current of the Hudson when factoring in an outgoing tide. 99.99% of the time, it is me who screws myself....... Thanks for the tip though, it’s a damn good idea.

I was entering the C&D canal- shoals on either side between the nuc plant and the eastern canal entrance...
 

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Think you need to fully invert your dry chem extinguishers. Sometimes if its all clumped up you might want to invert it then give it a smack to get the powder loosened up.
 

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Think you need to fully invert your dry chem extinguishers. Sometimes if its all clumped up you might want to invert it then give it a smack to get the powder loosened up.
Just tack harder:)

Every time you mess up and accidentally heel over at 75º you can tell your guests you were agitating your fire extinguishers.
 

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I came in late and didn’t pay attention to the normal current of the Hudson when factoring in an outgoing tide. 99.99% of the time, it is me who screws myself....... Thanks for the tip though, it’s a damn good idea.

I was entering the C&D canal- shoals on either side between the nuc plant and the eastern canal entrance...
Oh yeah.....that’s va common anchorage too for the larger ships
I generally come up the Jersey side and then stay outside the channel entering the Canal.

Our kellet is simple...a 10 lb mushroom anchor on a line with a very large shackle which will travel down the rope rode to a depth of 12 ft if possible ( it just has to be lower than the keel ) I attach the line to the same cleat the anchor rode is on. Works like a charm as the boat pivots around the line so no wrap.
 

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Yup… The dream is too often based on the images in the glossy mags, or now the ubiquitous “life is grand” Youtube videos. In fact, I wonder if there is an uptick in "cruising depression” as Pirsig called it.
I've noticed a few of the vidloggers recently hinting that the boat life is getting to them. Including Elana on La Vagabonde.
 

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I've noticed a few of the vidloggers recently hinting that the boat life is getting to them. Including Elana on La Vagabonde.....
I used to read the interview with a cruiser blog. 99% loved the heck out of it, but eventually returned to shore.

While I've read many that recount, with great fondness, their experience of raising a child on their boat, it has to change the experience. Hard enough to do on land, in my book. Interesting that both SVDelos and RAN Sailing published the same vid content on the same day. They were both leaving to complete the last few months of pregnancy and deliver their babies ashore. Time will tell, if their return to the cruising life is what they want.
 

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We were living aboard in a nice marina in Niagara when my son was born. Comfortable boat with wifi, shore power, pressure water etc. It wasn't that awesome.

Kids need grass and trees and space to play.

We sold the boat and bought a house with land, no question it was the right move. I didn't see it as a failure. I had been aboard for several years by then and never planned to live aboard indefinitely. In fact, I never plan to live aboard/cruise full time again. Houses are comfortable. Sailboats are great way to spend vacations and to recreate.
 

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Then don’t live in a city. No grass, trees or space to play.

Not much in the suburbs either come to think of it.

Definitely a minority life style.
 

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I came in late and didn’t pay attention to the normal current of the Hudson when factoring in an outgoing tide. 99.99% of the time, it is me who screws myself....... Thanks for the tip though, it’s a damn good idea.

I was entering the C&D canal- shoals on either side between the nuc plant and the eastern canal entrance...
Oh yeah.....that’s va common anchorage too for the larger ships
I generally come up the Jersey side and then stay outside the channel entering the Canal.

Our kellet is simple...a 10 lb mushroom anchor on a line with a very large shackle which will travel down the rope rode to a depth of 12 ft if possible ( it just has to be lower than the keel ) I attach the line to the same cleat the anchor rode is on. Works like a charm as the boat pivots around the line so no wrap.
Yeah it was all the commercial traffic I had to dodge that kept me from going below long enough to work a solution. I’ll give the kettle a whirl as it sounds like a good idea. Was a weird situation on the Hudson. Just one of those things- wrong place and time. Had to wait out that storm one way or another though. N/NE winds against the Gulf Stream make for a wet and bumpy ride. Won’t be there if I don’t have to be.
 

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Yeah it was all the commercial traffic I had to dodge that kept me from going below long enough to work a solution. I’ll give the kettle a whirl as it sounds like a good idea. Was a weird situation on the Hudson. Just one of those things- wrong place and time. Had to wait out that storm one way or another though. N/NE winds against the Gulf Stream make for a wet and bumpy ride. Won’t be there if I don’t have to be.
I never had a problem in the Hudson but, I have all chain. Though I know several boats where their rope anchor rode got wrapped around their boats keel. That was in calm conditions. Must not have been fun in the weather you experienced. Was on my boat for a Nor'easter a few years ago on a mooring would not do it again voluntarily.
 
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