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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ahoy!

I am considering buying a 40' sloop in the bay area next week. I currently live in Portland, OR and I would like to sail her up here in early September. I know that I'm running out of time because the sail should not be attempted October-May. Has anyone done this leg of the Pacific before. How did it go? I do not have enough time to go to Hawaii and come back in. I know some people who have attempted the journey but turned around because of seasickness. For context, I am an experienced sailor with multiple ocean crossings under my belt. My friend who will make the journey with me is also a very experienced sailor. I am planning on bringing 2-3 additional crew. I will make a contingency plan to come back S if needed, but I would really like to get her up N. I want to know more about fuel consumption with a headwind, the best ports to stop in, and crossing the Columbia Bar. My total diesel capacity (including jerry cans) is 160 gallons and the boat can point pretty well upwind. I also need to make an estimate of the total trip hours to get time off work. I'd love to talk to someone who has made the trip themselves.

Thanks,
Amanda
 

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I would consider trucking it
 

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Banned
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I would consider trucking it
 

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I've never sailed that (I'm an East Coast sailor), but I've read a lot about sailing that area. EVERBODY I've read, says that the trip north is usually motoring against current and wind the whole way. People who sail it, say that it's best go west first, to Hawaii and then up, or to sail about 800 miles, or more, northwest, out into the Pacific, and then sail back east to Oregon. And I've examined the coast via the satellite photos on Google Maps, and it is mostly rocky bluffs, and few ports. There are long stretches without any breaks in the coastline. It's not like the East Coast, where we have rivers, bays and estuaries situated all along the coast, each one about a half day's sail from one another.

Or, as those above have said, "I would consider trucking it".
 

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2008 Jeanneau 39i S/V Grace
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Your biggest hurdle is your schedule. Weather patterns don't care when you have a break. But it's doable. Brutal uphill slog, but doable.
 

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Barquito
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That is what I was thinking. If you need to tell the boss when you are going to be gone, you won't be able to wait for a weather window.

For those that DO have experience going up the West coast, how far off shore would she need to go to get out of the south setting current?
 

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S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
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Are you well paid at work? If so consider trucking it or paying someone to deliver it.

If you are trying to plan this and ask for 145 hours off of work, your boat is not going to make it home unless the weather cooperates during those hours. One thing to consider is some harbors or bars are dangerous to cross in a storm, I don't know which on that route but have read about accidents/fatalities in Oregon from attempted harbor entries when the Coast Guard did not approve/recommend it. This means you are likely to run back to the nearest safe harbor if bad conditions are forecasted rather than push through.

If you can get 3 weeks off, you would have a better chance of delivering your boat to your home port.
 
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