SailNet Community banner

21 - 40 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Do you have a 2 blade or 3 blade prop?
My engine is 27HP 2 blade prop but I don't know how the boat will behave as there will be a lot of first times once I get on the boat this weekend.
That was a 2 blade folding prop. How big / heavy is this boat? I would think you can do well with a 27hp engine. Are you making this trip alone? My boat is also in Warwick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
That was a 2 blade folding prop. How big / heavy is this boat? I would think you can do well with a 27hp engine. Are you making this trip alone?
The boat is a Hunter 340 weight is 11,000 lbs 34 Ft LOA, I have a couple friends coming along to help,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
The boat is a Hunter 340 weight is 11,000 lbs 34 Ft LOA, I have a couple friends coming along to help,
Oh good grief, 27hp is a ginormous engine for such a boat. You'll do fine against the current through the canal. My Bene was 13,500 pounds and 36 feet LOL. Just stay near the edge and you'll be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,884 Posts
Some canal tips.

I believe you are required to monitor ch16 and ch13 while in the canal and most vhf radios can be set to scan. You can hail the Cape Cod Canal Traffic Control on ch16 to ask if there is any large opposing traffic, if you're interested. Under 65ft, you are not required to obtain prior permission. However, the canal can temporarily close to additional traffic, so you should listen in and call to ask, if you're not sure. If you've been monitoring ch16 and ch13 on your approach, you should presumably pick up some 65+traffic being cleared in, making it more obvious it's open.

Stay to the right, just like you are driving on a road. Maintain course and speed. If you have a huge commercial vessel coming the other way, it will look more intimidating than it is. Just stay clear on your side. Due to hydrodynamics, those huge ships can't get too close to the side, so they'll appear closer to the center than you might like. There is plenty of room. It's when they come up behind and will be able to pass you that is more exhilarating. Again, stay to the right and maintain course and speed. They are required to maneuver around you, just don't make it hard to know what you're doing. You can always hail the vessel and they might try to hail you. More likely, they'll give you a sound signal to identify what side they plan to pass you on. One short blast for leaving you to port, two short blasts for leaving you to their starboard. If you're positioned properly, it should be two. You are supposed to respond with the same signal to acknowledge, but I'm sure they are accustom to recreational boats having no idea what the horn meant, perhaps not even having their own handy.

Canal Traffic Control typically issues a notice on the radio, if the bridge is about to close and an estimate closure time. If you have a current, I wouldn't get too close. You'll need to maneuver to hold position. If a following current, might be best to turn around and face the oncoming, until the bridge opens. Most boat props are more efficient in forward than reverse.

Have fun. The canal is a fun trip. Generally very relaxing and a nice break from open water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
You should have a good trip, weather is looking promising...I'm headed from Portsmouth, RI to Nantucket, MA on Saturday...nice to know others will be out...A lot of good information posted...I have also stopped at Sandwich marina (east end of canal) for fuel and a few hours of rest before moving eastward...the canal at night is a cool experience. Have a great trip and congrats on the boat!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Some canal tips.

I believe you are required to monitor ch16 and ch13 while in the canal and most vhf radios can be set to scan. You can hail the Cape Cod Canal Traffic Control on ch16 to ask if there is any large opposing traffic, if you're interested. Under 65ft, you are not required to obtain prior permission. However, the canal can temporarily close to additional traffic, so you should listen in and call to ask, if you're not sure. If you've been monitoring ch16 and ch13 on your approach, you should presumably pick up some 65+traffic being cleared in, making it more obvious it's open.

Stay to the right, just like you are driving on a road. Maintain course and speed. If you have a huge commercial vessel coming the other way, it will look more intimidating than it is. Just stay clear on your side. Due to hydrodynamics, those huge ships can't get too close to the side, so they'll appear closer to the center than you might like. There is plenty of room. It's when they come up behind and will be able to pass you that is more exhilarating. Again, stay to the right and maintain course and speed. They are required to maneuver around you, just don't make it hard to know what you're doing. You can always hail the vessel and they might try to hail you. More likely, they'll give you a sound signal to identify what side they plan to pass you on. One short blast for leaving you to port, two short blasts for leaving you to their starboard. If you're positioned properly, it should be two. You are supposed to respond with the same signal to acknowledge, but I'm sure they are accustom to recreational boats having no idea what the horn meant, perhaps not even having their own handy.

Canal Traffic Control typically issues a notice on the radio, if the bridge is about to close and an estimate closure time. If you have a current, I wouldn't get too close. You'll need to maneuver to hold position. If a following current, might be best to turn around and face the oncoming, until the bridge opens. Most boat props are more efficient in forward than reverse.

Have fun. The canal is a fun trip. Generally very relaxing and a nice break from open water.
Thank you for the tips! they are VERY appreciated!!
 

·
Learning the HARD way...
Joined
·
7,500 Posts
I normally keep my boat in Warwick, and know the area well. If you start early and push, you could make Cuttyhunk on the first night. I always seem to get a late start, and stop at 3rd beach. 2nd night is Hadley Harbor, but I have sailed Cuttyhunk to Beverly in 1 day on a Sabre 28. Nice stops along the way are Onset, Scituate and LOTS of bailout options.

@sailingfool provided you with a good lesson on timing your transition of the CCC.

Enjoy the trip!
 
  • Like
Reactions: SanderO

·
bell ringer
Joined
·
5,082 Posts
by far the hardest and most dangerous part is the Boston Harbor area at night
 

·
ASA and PSIA Instructor
Joined
·
4,215 Posts
by far the hardest and most dangerous part is the Boston Harbor area at night
That is a puzzling comment. Facetious? Boston harbor is very well marked, with limited and well defined hazards, very low traffic except prime weekend periods and very little commercial.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,884 Posts
If one takes the primary shipping channel in and out of Boston Harbor, it's pretty clear. However, there are various alternate routes through the little islands and they can be confusing. Not so much that one would run aground, but certainly whether one is going the right way.
 

·
bell ringer
Joined
·
5,082 Posts
That is a puzzling comment. Facetious? Boston harbor is very well marked, with limited and well defined hazards, very low traffic except prime weekend periods and very little commercial.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
Based on my 10 years sailing in the Boston waters the area around the harbor islands is by far more dangerous than going through the Cape Cod Canal and the trip to Boston. So keep your insults to yourself!
 

·
ASA and PSIA Instructor
Joined
·
4,215 Posts
Based on my 10 years sailing in the Boston waters the area around the harbor islands is by far more dangerous than going through the Cape Cod Canal and the trip to Boston. So keep your insults to yourself!
Opps, that's just my opinion, I guess with my fifty years sailing in Boston waters I've gotten to just take it too for granted...Give yourself some time...
 

·
bell ringer
Joined
·
5,082 Posts
you aren't one of the ferry drivers are you, they seem to take it pretty for granted while going aground
 

·
ASA and PSIA Instructor
Joined
·
4,215 Posts
you aren't one of the ferry drivers are you, they seem to take it pretty for granted while going aground
Even worse is their practice of staying on schedule by cruising at twenty knots in dense fog
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #35 ·
by far the hardest and most dangerous part is the Boston Harbor area at night
I am very comfortable in the Boston harbor, I have been sailing in the harbor for the last 10 years and have sailed at night many times. I would rather arrive in the daylight but if its dark I am fine with it. I'll be using Navionics for navigation.
 

·
Registered
Hunter 49
Joined
·
2 Posts
With a long day on Monday, you can do this trip in two days, as the Canal tide is ideal for an easy AM transit on Tuesday. On Monday you need to get to Onset or Pocasset, or make the trip more relaxed, and take three days with a Monday overnight in Cuttyhunk.

My hint for planning a Canal passage is "FEEW" which stands for "flood runs East, ebb runs West". So to pass thru East, ideally you would enter the Canal about three hours after low tide, allowing you to complete the 9 mile passage in an hour or so.

So referencing high tide from one of the many tide tables (or from your chartplotter):
which tells you that on Tuesday May 11 high tide is 7:12AM EDT and 7:24PM EDT,
and this reference provides this neat table:
Tuesday May 11, 2021
Cape Cod Canal
Tue -- 12:50 AM -4.40 knots Max Ebb
Tue -- 04:02 AM 0.01 knots Slack
Tue -- 05:26 AM Sunrise
Tue -- 05:30 AM Moonrise
Tue -- 07:12 AM 4.19 knots Max Flood
Tue -- 10:26 AM -0.03 knots Slack
Tue -- 01:11 PM -4.31 knots Max Ebb
Tue -- 03:01 PM New Moon
Tue -- 04:20 PM 0.02 knots Slack
Tue -- 07:24 PM 4.08 knots Max Flood
Tue -- 07:51 PM Sunset
Tue -- 07:53 PM Moonset
Tue -- 10:36 PM -0.17 knots Slack

So you have excellent timing for an early morning Canal transit. On Monday you would have a long 66 mile day to either Onset or Pocasset, leave at 5AM or so and it is manageable. I personally like Pocasset as Kingman's has moorings, gas, water and a nice restaurant. Leaving Pocasset Tuesday about 6AM, a little after 8AM you will be heading north in Massachusetts Bay with 50 miles remaining to Boston. If you want to break this leg up, spend the night in Scituate unless you feel seeing Plymouth is worth two hours of in/out travel.

If you dont have an Eldredge's, get one as its the best reference for visualizing the current direction and strengths across this region. And read this

FWIW entering Pocasset I prefer using the South channel as it has fewer bends and turns than the North, just be sure to not to turn right before red N "14".
Having made this trip many times, salingfool's advice is very sound. I would suggest a mooring at Kingsman in Red Brook Harbor (Pocasset) to insure a well protected sleep vs Onset which is protected but a very narrow and shallow channel. I would also plan out a 3 day transit in case you get started later or Buzzards Bay weather does not cooperate, etc. Often times, the weather/wind and sea state on Buzzards Bay is much different than forecasted. If you end up transiting the Canal late in the day, Sandwich is an easy stop. They don't have moorings but their slip's are reasonable. Then you have a shorter run to Boston. Most times I make the run from Pocasset to Scituate (lots of mooring availability), then a short run the next day to Marblehead. I have gone Pocasset to Marblehead but it can be a long exhausting day for crew if it's not perfect weather. I've made this trip in a 27, 36, and my current Hunter 49 - make a plan with 2 and 3 day itinerary that way if things don't go as planned you won't have to figure it out on the fly or under duress. It's a great trip. I went Mystic, CT to Marblehead last May in my new to me 49.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,884 Posts
I would suggest a mooring at Kingsman in Red Brook Harbor (Pocasset)
I love that marina, but haven’t been, since covid. Can’t be the same vibe quite yet. Love their newsletters too. However, it’s a long way in and back out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hello Shelley,
Many of the responses to your questions seem to treat your Hunter 34 as if it were a powerboat. Do you plan to sail? As a "powerboat" you probably will average about 5.5 knots. Yes, you can power at higher RPM, but 5.5 knots is a probable long-term average. If you sail, with SW winds in the range of 10-15 knots boat speed can increase to about 6.5 knots when reaching. The first leg, Warwick to Breton Reef buoy #2 is about 18 nm. If you really do leave at 5 am you should be off BR2 by 8:30 am. This first leg is likely to be almost directly into the wind, so power-sailing with just a mainsail makes sense. Once you round BR2 you should be on a reach. Personally, I would NOT plan on staying at Cuttyhunk. While delightful on a cruise, anchoring outside is very poor (lots of grass) and inside the inner harbor I am not sure the moorings are ready yet. Besides, you would arrive there early in the afternoon, with many good hours of sailing left before sunset. I personally would head for Marion, a fine, well protected harbor, with good anchoring and many moorings, and in reasonably close proximity to the CCC. The distance from BR2 to Marion is about 36 miles. With favorable wind and current this should take 6 hours, but let us assume 7 hours to be conservative. Thus, you should arrive in Marion around 2:30 - 3 pm. The next morning it is 15 NM from Marion through the CCC. If you again leave early (5 - 6 am), with favorable current through the canal you should exit the canal no later than 9:30 am. You now have 42 nm to go to Boston. At 5.5 knots this will take about 7.5 hours, allowing you to arrive in Boston around 5 pm. Fair winds and following seas. Paul Jacobs. P.S. I live in Warwick, sail a 1990 Catalina 34 and have been through the CCC many times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,884 Posts
Personally, I would NOT plan on staying at Cuttyhunk. While delightful on a cruise, anchoring outside is very poor (lots of grass)
Not to beat a dead horse, but this is mentioned frequently. If one does not try to snug up immediately behind the mooring field to port, as approaching the harbor entrance, the water is a bit deeper and grass really isn’t an issue. One may want to insure, once anchored further out, they aren’t in the current for Canapitsit channel, but it’s not extreme out in the anchorage. It just may cause one to swing oddly. Ones keel may favor the current over the wind.

Here is a screenshot of the outer harbor. Blue is where the outer moorings are. Red is where everyone bunches up at anchor and it’s shallow enough, grass grows. Green is where I try to be and the grass is not a big deal. You still need to insure a good set, by backing down hard, but it’s far more likely to work the first time. The furthest out is where superyachts may stop over for the night, when transiting.

56749114-D091-4070-8A68-E8386C86C098.jpeg
 
  • Like
Reactions: SanderO

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,204 Posts
Cuttyhunk is lovely. I think the Marion option makes more sense.
 
21 - 40 of 44 Posts
Top