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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone,

I am working on formulating a hand cream for sailors. Myself and friends have experienced extremely dry, calloused and cracked hands when sailing and haven't found much relief from what's out there (chemically, ineffective, expensive etc.). I think the exposure to the elements, saltwater and rope use are probably fellas that cause it, but we can't avoid them when sailing. I've found gloves don't do much to help.

If I may, I would like to get your input on a few things:
1. do you experience a similar problem?
2. if so what do you do? Do you use a hand cream?
3. What would you look for in a hand cream? For you, what's wrong with what's out there?

Thanks in advance. Any input or suggestions would be brilliant!

:cut_out_animated_em

Best
Joscelyne
 

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As I have gotten older, I do experience dry cracked skin during winter sailing, mainly frostbite racing where my hands inevitably end up being wet for hours at a time. I wear sailing gloves with glove liners, and have calluses, both of which minimize abrasion damage. (Calluses are a good thing, not a bad thing if you are a sailor) If I have dry skin or cracked skin, I use Neutrogena Norwegian Formula Hand Cream which works very well when I get ashore. A tube lasts me most of a winter which seems pretty reasonable cost wise. The only issues with that product is that remains greasy for a short period of time and once the skin cracks I need to use it several times a day. In the rare case where the skin has cracked enough to bleed, I use Neosporin and put a bandaid on it to protect from infection (or even tape it to restrict movement) and as a way to aid healing by protecting the wound.

It does not seem that a specialized sailing hand cream is needed. Now then, if you could come up with a more affordable version of "Harken Derm" sunblock, that would be really great. I like Harken as a company and really applaud everything about this product, except that it is way too expensive.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #3
As I have gotten older, I do experience dry cracked skin during winter sailing, mainly frostbite racing where my hands inevitably end up being wet for hours at a time. I wear sailing gloves with glove liners, and have calluses, both of which minimize abrasion damage. (Calluses are a good thing, not a bad thing if you are a sailor) If I have dry skin or cracked skin, I use Neutrogena Norwegian Formula Hand Cream which works very well when I get ashore. A tube lasts me most of a winter which seems pretty reasonable cost wise. The only issues with that product is that remains greasy for a short period of time and once the skin cracks I need to use it several times a day. In the rare case where the skin has cracked enough to bleed, I use Neosporin and put a bandaid on it to protect from infection (or even tape it to restrict movement) and as a way to aid healing by protecting the wound.

It does not seem that a specialized sailing hand cream is needed. Now then, if you could come up with a more affordable version of "Harken Derm" sunblock, that would be really great. I like Harken as a company and really applaud everything about this product, except that it is way too expensive.

Jeff
Hi Jeff,

Thanks for that! I haven't used the Neutrogena cream but will give it a go. That Harken Derm is expensive!! It would be interesting to know what bumps the price up there..

Have a good day
Joscelyne
 

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I understand the problem, but personally I work to get my hands in that shape and keep them there. Hard, calloused, and dry. Allows me to make more mistakes, like letting a rope run through them, or pulling a box cutter toward my palms, or getting on the wrong end of my grinder, etc.

The downside is often my fingerprint ID on the phone won't work, and sometimes it's so bad that I have trouble with touch-sensitive devices.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I understand the problem, but personally I work to get my hands in that shape and keep them there. Hard, calloused, and dry. Allows me to make more mistakes, like letting a rope run through them, or pulling a box cutter toward my palms, or getting on the wrong end of my grinder, etc.

The downside is often my fingerprint ID on the phone won't work, and sometimes it's so bad that I have trouble with touch-sensitive devices.

Mark
That's another way to look at it - I can see that:ship-captain: For me, there's a line between tough hands and hurting hands. Never to completely to get rid of the calluses etc but to keep them from keeping me up at night kind of thing.

Cheers
 

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Try Bag Balm.

Yeah, it was made for cow tits, but folks in the northeast swear by it.
 

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I don't put anything on my hands but sunscreen.

I do find barehand kettlebell swings and snatches during down time help to keep my hands from getting too soft.

Also try to avoid the use of gloves as much as possible as I think the moisture contributes to sore hands.
 

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Hi Jeff,

Thanks for that! I haven't used the Neutrogena cream but will give it a go. That Harken Derm is expensive!! It would be interesting to know what bumps the price up there..

Have a good day
Joscelyne
So here is my understanding of the deal with Derm. To begin with there is some pretty compelling evidence that conventional sunscreens with oxybenzone and octinoxate are doing damage to the coral reefs of the world. The impact of these chemicals appears to be substantially lowering the temperatures at which reefs die. Most conventional sunscreens contain perfumes and nano-particles both metallic and non-metallic that also play a role in reef damage. Many brands contain perfumes and the types used are long lived in the atmosphere and are controversially seen as potentially doing environmental damage.

One of the Harken Brothers is married to a dermatologist. Reportedly she had become concerned with the environmental impact of sunblocks and began researching the current market for better products. As she began researching the make-up of the existing products, she concluded that medically that the formulation of most existing sunblocks really wasn't all that healthy for the skin. She apparently developed Derm as a healthier sunblock with a minimal negative environmental impact. From what I gather the product sounds like the right thing. The video seems to suggest that it is quite dense and so you use much less of it so price wise it may not be that expensive if you really don't need as much.

I had planned to try Derm this season, but with the Covid-19 shut down, I have not been on the water as much this season and have been using up last year's supply of my previous go to (Neutrogena Sport) when I have been out there. Its hard to justify spending 3.5 times as much as the Neutrogena, but I thought I would give Derm a try.

I will note that a number of other companies have begun developing 'reef safe' products. They vary pretty widely in how they achieve that, but most in the SPF 30 range are of similar cost to the Derm, and may not have the 'skin health' component that Derm claims to have.

Jeff
 

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I was introduced to a product called Palm Balm back in my CrossFit days. Love that stuff. Also Udderly Smooth Udder Cream in the winter living in MN. Good stuff.
 

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Try Bag Balm.

Yeah, it was made for cow tits, but folks in the northeast swear by it.
Frankly, smells a bit like a barn yard too (not manure, more like musty dirt), but it really works to heal damaged skin.

I'm also a fan of Eucerin Original Healing. No perfume, which I can't stand.
 

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I read up on sunscreen years ago, when I was suddenly curious how this thin layer of goo possibly works to prevent radiation burns.

There are two methods and many commercial sunscreen have both.

First is by reflecting the radiation, which was traditionally done with zinc oxide. Its the old fashion white paste that you saw on noses in a 1950s beach scene. This is still used in sunscreen today, but can now be manufactured in particles so small, you don't see them.

The other method is by using chemicals that inherently absorb radiation. These have a capacity limit, beyond whether they are washed or sweated away. Once they absorb all they can, you have to reapply, which is where that recommendation comes from.. They can also be responsible for your skin feeling hot, even if you've moved to the shade and don't have sunburn. You are a radiation holding cell, until you wash it off.

Harken Derm uses no chemicals, only reflecting elements. Zinc and Titanium. I suspect they are more expensive than producing radiation absorbing chemicals.

I really like the idea, as I think our generation and those surrounding us, have been slowly poisoning ourselves with a weird slurry of chemicals that have never been tested in the random combinations found in our bloodstreams. Frankly, I'm more worried about us than the coral.

Derm is certainly crazy expensive. Roughly $40 for 3.4oz, compared with maybe $7 for 7oz of Coopertone and even less for generics. The Derm website says you need approx an ounce for a full body application. I rarely apply to the torso, but arms, legs, face, ears and neck. It sounds like a $5 to $10 per use product. That's ridiculous.
 

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For my skin problems I use hydrating hand cremes, not particular as to the choice, whatever is on sale. I don’t use the greasy cremes, they don’t help much on my skin. I do use gloves all the time and try hard to keep them dry. Have several pairs around the cockpit. Mostly cheap gloves. I try to avoid damaging skin on my hands because getting them to heal up while sailing is not easy. And keeping them warm in cold weather. Prevention Rules.
 

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Mederma is what I use, nurses use and some chefs

I recently used Mederma scar relief on my knee replacement scar and watched it improve appearence, , and pliability.
 

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We use an Avon product called moisture therapy. Like it because it has no petroleum in it, have had great results when we lived up north and I worked outside, face and hands took a beating, this stuff fixed it. There are several versions, I like the one with no color or odor.
 
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