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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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As I have gotten older, I do experience dry cracked skin during winter sailing, mainly frostbite racing where my hands inevitably end up being wet for hours at a time. I wear sailing gloves with glove liners, and have calluses, both of which minimize abrasion damage. (Calluses are a good thing, not a bad thing if you are a sailor) If I have dry skin or cracked skin, I use Neutrogena Norwegian Formula Hand Cream which works very well when I get ashore. A tube lasts me most of a winter which seems pretty reasonable cost wise. The only issues with that product is that remains greasy for a short period of time and once the skin cracks I need to use it several times a day. In the rare case where the skin has cracked enough to bleed, I use Neosporin and put a bandaid on it to protect from infection (or even tape it to restrict movement) and as a way to aid healing by protecting the wound.

It does not seem that a specialized sailing hand cream is needed. Now then, if you could come up with a more affordable version of "Harken Derm" sunblock, that would be really great. I like Harken as a company and really applaud everything about this product, except that it is way too expensive.

Jeff
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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10,218 Posts
Hi Jeff,

Thanks for that! I haven't used the Neutrogena cream but will give it a go. That Harken Derm is expensive!! It would be interesting to know what bumps the price up there..

Have a good day
Joscelyne
So here is my understanding of the deal with Derm. To begin with there is some pretty compelling evidence that conventional sunscreens with oxybenzone and octinoxate are doing damage to the coral reefs of the world. The impact of these chemicals appears to be substantially lowering the temperatures at which reefs die. Most conventional sunscreens contain perfumes and nano-particles both metallic and non-metallic that also play a role in reef damage. Many brands contain perfumes and the types used are long lived in the atmosphere and are controversially seen as potentially doing environmental damage.

One of the Harken Brothers is married to a dermatologist. Reportedly she had become concerned with the environmental impact of sunblocks and began researching the current market for better products. As she began researching the make-up of the existing products, she concluded that medically that the formulation of most existing sunblocks really wasn't all that healthy for the skin. She apparently developed Derm as a healthier sunblock with a minimal negative environmental impact. From what I gather the product sounds like the right thing. The video seems to suggest that it is quite dense and so you use much less of it so price wise it may not be that expensive if you really don't need as much.

I had planned to try Derm this season, but with the Covid-19 shut down, I have not been on the water as much this season and have been using up last year's supply of my previous go to (Neutrogena Sport) when I have been out there. Its hard to justify spending 3.5 times as much as the Neutrogena, but I thought I would give Derm a try.

I will note that a number of other companies have begun developing 'reef safe' products. They vary pretty widely in how they achieve that, but most in the SPF 30 range are of similar cost to the Derm, and may not have the 'skin health' component that Derm claims to have.

Jeff
 
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