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We departed from Newport, RI and sailed almost a straight line to San Juan beginning October 31 and arriving November 9th. No wind above 20 knots, no waves/swells above 4ft and absolutely no rain, not even a single thunderstorm. We heard quite a few Salty Dawgs on the VHF radio along the way. Picking a good weather window is key, nobody can tell you when it’s okay to go, not even a weather service. The decision needs to be yours alone.
 

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169 Posts
Just sail down to Puerto Rico, the entire process couldn’t be any easier. No check in, quarantine or covid testing for US citizens On US boats. I figure the US officials watched our progress sailing down on AIS, then nothing to do upon arrival, not even ROAM. Diesel fuel $3,55 per gallon at the dock.

Fantastic weather and friendly people.
 

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I never look at noonsite, usually full of wrong or dated information. The port police were on the super yacht next to us conducting a complete scheduled safety inspection yesterday, and didn’t come over to even ask for our papers or vaccination cards. AIS is a handy tool for the authorities and for us interstate/international cruisers.
 

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169 Posts
St. Croix was just as easy as Puerto Rico, except that I was required to obtain a negative covid pcr antigen test in Puerto Rico prior to departure even though I have a vaccination card. Not a big deal, as the lab woman came right to the marina in her mobile van, cost $100, but significantly more than the €10 we paid in Greece for the same test.
 

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Check in was easy at Jolly Harbor, Antigua. From now on its only going to be close friends and family aboard, Everyone else seems to want to be fed and paid these days for taking a pleasure cruise and doing no work. I’m very much done with crew, completely disgusted. I do all the boat prep, Auto does all the steering, and all crew does is complain about everything.
 

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169 Posts
Things change for many so called crew when they’re hundreds of miles off shore, issues that can’t be predicted on short day sails or harbor hops. They become overly obsessed with safety and communications with home. Nearly everyone today lives on their smartphone and can’t be at peace without the constant contact and worry. My wife and I go cruising to get away from all that nonsense, most can’t live without it today.
 

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169 Posts
You’d be OK with crew constantly complaining that they don’t feel safe on your well-prepared Oyster? It’s not just the young people obsessed with constant communications these days, people of all ages can’t stop playing with their phones which causes their anxiety to run amok. When was the last time you were 500 miles or more off-shore with crew?
 

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Falmouth and English Harbor, Antigua have only about 1/4 the boats and tourists that would be considered normal for this time of year. Come here and you’ll have the entire island to yourself. Very nice.

Covid tests for Salty Dawgs who want to return to the US, $75 by a nice MD who makes group house calls to English Harbor. Says he hasn’t had a test come back positive in over four weeks.
 

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169 Posts
I will most likely be located in the Falmouth anchorage just off the beach for most of February taking care of a few boat projects, Jolly Harbor for the end of January. English Harbor gets too crowded.

See you then.
 
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