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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everybody!

I'm new to this forum thing, but I have a question regarding Santana 22 boat plans. I have a 1974 Santana 22. It's been a great boat thus far and now I've run into an issue that I'm trying to work around. I'm hoping to be able to fix this without taking the boat out of the water at the moment.

In the cockpit of the boat there is a piece of wood that fits around the rudder shaft as it goes through the cockpit. The corners of this wood have rotted away and so the bolts no longer hold it in place. This allows the block of wood to shift side-to-side. Unfortunately, it is also causing the rudder shaft to move laterally, as well. I need to replace the piece of wood. However, I need to remove everything from the rudder shaft to slide the old piece off and the new piece on. There is one bolt that I'm worried about on the shaft. I have a hard time believing that it is the only thing holding the rudder in place, but I want to make sure. If I remove this bolt, will I drop my rudder out of the boat? I have attached a photo (hopefully it works) and the bolt is the rusty one you can see nearest the floor of the cockpit. I will also have to remove the tiller, but I think that won't be an issue...unless you know better than me.

Any ideas? I have a hard time believe that this one little bolt is the lifeblood of holding the rudder in place, but I want to be sure.

Thanks,
nbaisley
 

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A perfect day!
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116 Posts
Why don't you just do it in two pieces? Split right down the middle, like two "Cs" around the post until you can take it out of the water and replace with a one piece block. It looks like removing that bolt will drop the rudder, although I don't know your boat.
Chris Greco
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Chris,

That's a good idea. I've considered that, but was slightly worried about the small amount of wood lost by the sawblade cutting down the middle. I could put in some filler in the gap, especially if it is a temporary fix until I pull it out of the water. I may be able to design the cut so that I don't have too worry about the loss of wood as well.

I appreciate the feedback!

--Nick
 

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A perfect day!
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Nick....not sure how that would be a factor since fabricating a new block should account for those dimensions. Alternately, why not consider fabricating the replacement halves out of aluminum stock? Except for purist, appearance, shouldn't that do the trick? For now at least?
 

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Sailor
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You don't have verticals movement now, do you? If not, that bolt is not keeping the rudder up. Looking at it, it appears that the rudder shaft is in 2 sections and you seperate them by removing the nut and bolt. That said, I wonder what IS keeping the rudder shaft in place? Why is it not leaking? The rot on the wood seems to be from water from above (rain) sitting on the sole not sea water. There must by some type of stuffing box that the shaft passes through. I see that there is a seam just below the nut. I'm thinking that there is an integral collar on the bottom shaft that rests on top of the stuffing box that keeps it from sliding up or down.

Now the important questions: if you probe around the area just on top of the piece of wood, does it seam that there is wood under a collar on the shaft or does the shaft go straight down through the wood? Can someone pull up on the shaft so you can see if a space appears between the wood and a collar molded on the shaft. If so, the wood IS keeping the shaft from sliding down and it's removal could be problematic. You say that the wood slides around from side to side. This causes the shaft to do the same. So this wood is not caulked down. Yet no water comes through? I think you need to figure out the answer to this question prior to disassembly. I don't think that bolt is keeping the rudder in the boat by itself. Something is. What? If that wood is what a collar is resting on, it's removal would be a problem. You could let water in. If want to know more first. Maybe take it to a beach and beach it so the rudder would be supported underneath? With calipers, find the diameter of the shaft so you can drill a correctly sized hole in a new piece of wood at the ready to install in place. Using caulk as an adhesive, adhere the new wood on the sole to stabilize the rudder.

Good luck,

Tod
 

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Otter
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I have a 94 Santana 2023 and it sounds like the same issue I have only my deck plate is made of plastic. For now I am just going to put some epoxy to keep it from shifting but will be making a new one out of Lexan. If your setup is like mine there is a through hull in the cockpit where the rudder stock runs through. It is really easy to swap the rudder in and out if you hop in the water.
 
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