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I just came across a listing for the Scanmar 33, and it looked pretty good. Anybody have any info on this boat? Looks like it could be a good boat for single/short handed on the Chesapeake. Thanks
 

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This is a bit late for an answer but...

There is a Scanmar 35 for sale around New York area (www.mcmichaelyachtbrokers.com) I saw it and was very impressed. (And the price is great!)

The main difference between the two is the aft cabin on the 35. I did some research, here is what I found.

The 33 is popular in Scandinavia. Although the company is out of business, the builder is still around building other boats and does take pride in Scanmars. You can still get parts made.

There were about 500 33''s made and under 100 35''s. There is a large group of Scanmar owners in Norway and Finland. I found them and e-mailed some of them. There is an active owners group on the web. (The small problem is that it''s not in English.)

The opinion of the two owners that I communicated with was very positive. Built well, performs good.

Almost good enough for me to buy the Scanmar BUT... what stopped me was these facts
1. There are very few Scanmars in US
2. If something goes wrong it may be a nightmare to fix or replace.
3. Should you ever try to sell the boat it may not be so easy

Perhaps I paniced prematurely?

Eugene

P.S. I can forward some of the emails that I saved if you wish.
 

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Do you know where I might find a rubrail for this boat/ I recently purchased the Scanmar 33 and there is about 2 feet that are destroyed. its a really nice boat - just needs some TLC and a few parts


thanks

mike
 

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Also a late reply but maybe helpful to new viewers: I have a 1986 ScanMar 33, have owned it and maintained it for 11 years. It is a good boat and you can find reviews and information about it on the web. I have not had any trouble finding parts to maintain it, although most things are metric or European so it is not a simple as an American production boat. Like any 30 year old boat it requires upkeep. A few of the important modifications it required were redesign and replace the chainplates (they are of a poor design and have known to break), rerouted the bilge pump system and added a second pump (it exited through a through hull below the waterline and relied on a back flow preventer) to exit above the waterline to eliminate possible siphoning, removed and rebolted the rudder as it was leaking. I also replaced the prop shaft strut because I ran over some lines and it broke and bent the shaft. At that time I switched the shaft to SAE one inch and put a new a new prop on. My next job will be to drop the keel, inspect and replace the keel bolts.
 
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