SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 101 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
well, i have been considering building a chinese sculling oar, a yuloh, for my cal 27; either in addition to a motor or instead of one. i have never actually sculled, before. like every dinghy sailor i have semi-sculled with my rudder, from time to time. but, i've never sculled with an oar. while ssailing the 9' dinghy, troday, i had about 15 minutes of dead calm, between the morning's 5mph winds and the afternoon's 12 to 15 mph winds. so, i decided to try sculing. i left my oar in it's regular oar lock, rather than trying to put it over the transom. i used the falling leaf type of horizontal sculling....and i was amazed. it wasn't hard to keep the boat going straight, even though the oar was very offset, by simply changing the angle of attack between 'strokes'. and, although i had 5'2" of oar on one side of the lock and only 10" of oar at my hand ( very bad leverage problem ), i used far less effort to scull the boat at a good pace than i would be to row.

and i was able to scull backwards, too. it was simple, although because my of leverage problem, it was harder than sculling forwards. i had problems keeping the oar in the water ( forwards the water holds the oar down. backwards it pushes it up ) and keeping tye proper angle of attack to scull straight. so, what i did was scull backwards with both oars. using a real sculling oar, closer to the center of the transom would be much easier. also, a yuloh would be much more efficient than my oars, to use for sculling.

everyone should try to scull and learn it. it's almost magical, how it works. kind of like sailing up wind.

so, a yuloh is in my future and, depending on costs, maybe a motor is not...at least for now.

i am going to build my yuloh and then practice sculling the cal backwards and forwards, in the slip, until i get good at it. then, i will practice sculling out of and into the slip. if i get good at that, straight sculling will be easy. that way, when i get the cal ready to sail, i will be good at sculling, too.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mbianka

·
islander bahama 24
Joined
·
1,842 Posts
Sounds great would keep the engine though there are times when you may need power and both hands at the same time for different tasks. (moofie will strike). What are you considering for the lock on the transom?
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,011 Posts
I've sculled quite a bit, on dinks and the like. It is the most effective way to move an inflatable in strong winds, especially from the front.
But I wouldn't want it as my only propulsion method, on any boat, unless I wanted to all my boating at the whim of mother nature.
I can just imagine sailing back to the marina after the wind has unexpectedly piped up to 25 to 30 knots and having to anchor outside for a couple of hours/days before it calms enough for me to scull into my slip. Not at all near the top of my list of "must do's".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
I say go for it. I have been using a Yuloh for a year and a half and love it. It will make you a far better sailor. I still haven't perfected the mount but I'm close. Be very careful when entering the through way, I have come head to head with more than one guy leaving the slip under full throttle, it get very interesting.
http://logofthe.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/img_0418.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
"Our present yacht, Easy Go, is a 34' Junk Rigged Dory Schooner of Jay Benford design. She has no motor and relies entirely on wind, yuloh and kedge anchor for propulsion. We have found, through experimentation, that it is indeed possible to abandon the Internal Combustion Engine for an environmentally superior form of auxiliary propulsion."

Duckworks - The Easy Go Yuloh - Part One
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Sounds great would keep the engine though there are times when you may need power and both hands at the same time for different tasks. (moofie will strike). What are you considering for the lock on the transom?
there is no motor, at present.:D

either i will machine out a pin or i will use a bicycle trailer hitch. i have read that works well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I have sculled many miles chasing ducks. Sculling a larger boat may work if you have lots of time to get out of the way of that ship bearing down on you. A motor may/can save your life. :D

Paul T
little chinese women scull large, heavy boats at a decent clip with a yuloh. i should be able to match the physical endurance....i hope!:laugher

i don't know about evading a big ship. i sail around the inner harbor, in my dinghy. there are some big ships and tugs, there. i keep my distance. the only way i see that being a real problem would be in poor visibility. no wind. can't see very far. yeah. a big boat might sneak up on me, then.

everyone says about a motor being a life saving device, yet there are a good number of folks that sail without them. i always have. i have been looking into a motor but a part of me really hates to go that route, after all of these years as a 'sailing purist'. but, then all the warnings people give me make me doubt my thoughts on that. it just seems to me that, during the age of sail, the waters were teaming with sailing vessels and other non motorized vessels and everyone got along without a motor. it makes me wonder if motors are really such a necessity or are humans just so used to our machines that we think we can't live without them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
But I wouldn't want it as my only propulsion method, on any boat, unless I wanted to all my boating at the whim of mother nature.
it won't be the only propulsion method. it's got sails, too.:D

I've sculled quite a bit, on dinks and the like. It is the most effective way to move an inflatable in strong winds, especially from the front.

I can just imagine sailing back to the marina after the wind has unexpectedly piped up to 25 to 30 knots and having to anchor outside for a couple of hours/days before it calms enough for me to scull into my slip. Not at all near the top of my list of "must do's".
but didn't you just contradict yourself? you said it's the most effective way to move an inflatable in strong winds, yet you wouldn't be able to use it to move a sailboat in strong winds? i would think the inflatable would give you more trouble, in strong winds, than a heavier sailboat. but, i could be wrong. it does happen once in a while. why, i remember this time i was wrong....when was that? ummm....1984 i believe.....:laugher

ahhhh i am in a happy mood. great day of sailing. rum at dinner. sometimes, life can be very good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I say go for it. I have been using a Yuloh for a year and a half and love it. It will make you a far better sailor. I still haven't perfected the mount but I'm close. Be very careful when entering the through way, I have come head to head with more than one guy leaving the slip under full throttle, it get very interesting.
http://logofthe.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/img_0418.jpg
see? it's not sailing without a motor that's dangerous. it's the people with motors.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
Discussion Starter #12

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
I didn't even know you could scull in reverse. She displaces about 8k so not too heavy but handles like a dream in tight spots. I have a stern anchor on a roller ready to launch as brakes but have yet to need it for that pupose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
i don't know. i am torn. i have always sailed without a motor. when i bought my holiday 20, it came with an outboard. i bartered that motor for something i felt was more useful. never felt sorry for that decision. when i got this boat, i had the intention to keep sailing without a motor. but you read so many posts predicting dire desasters awaiting anyone who has no motor and so many well meaning people advise me to have a motor because they don't want somethi ng bad to happen to me.

it makes me think that i am, wrong about a motor. that maybe i'm just not being responsible. then, i think, heck, i've been sailing all these years without a motor. why is now different? and people sailed without motors for a looooooong time before the internal combustion engine was even a gleam in anyone's eye....and they didn't crash and die like flies. and i think, why is now different? why am i?

i don't know. i'm torn about the whole thing. if i have an engine, i'd much rather quiet, clean electricity. at least i could avoid te things i hate the most about power boats ( besides their rude owners :D ). but do i actually NEED one? am i really risking my vessel without one, any more than i would be risking it with one? i want to be responsible....at least to a degree :p but, a huge part of me says that a motor is a betrayal of....well...of sailing, or maybe the spirit of it.

what to do? that's the question? really. that's the question. who would actually ask "to be or not to be?" :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
I eventually put a small kicker on my boat not for safety but for convenience. The slip I was in back when I was in a slip was buried deep in a tricky harbor and while it was always easy getting in I was missing too many great days getting out. Last year I used two gallons of fuel and still regularly sail on and off the hook. Hell i even accidentally sailed through a crowded anchorage tiller less one time but that's a whole different story.

Engines rarely make you any safer, seamanship does. I always have a plan A B and C. Last year on one day alone I witnessed 5 collisions in my marina all with engines. People can get them selfs pretty worked up imagining all the things that can happen to you when engine-less but I have to say I sail in a pretty heavy traffic area with lots of current, tankers, ferry's and rocks and day in and day out its the guys with engines sinking their boats. Nothing wrong with having an engine nothing wrong going without.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
i'd love to hear that story!
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,011 Posts
it won't be the only propulsion method. it's got sails, too.:D

but didn't you just contradict yourself? you said it's the most effective way to move an inflatable in strong winds, yet you wouldn't be able to use it to move a sailboat in strong winds? i would think the inflatable would give you more trouble, in strong winds, than a heavier sailboat. but, i could be wrong. it does happen once in a while. why, i remember this time i ewas wrong....when was that? ummm....1984 i believe.....:laugher
"but didn't you just contradict yourself? Gee, I don't know, an inflatable may weigh a couple of hundred pounds. A sailboat weighs a tiny bit more, don't you think?
"it's got sails, too" Yeah, and you're going to sail into a marina in 25 to 30 knots of wind? Seems you're a much better sailor than I. I'd probably wait it out, if I didn't have an engine.
How do all of you "sailing purists" up in the PNW some how manage to avoid all those high current areas while sculling your boats on windless days. Amazing seamanship, I guess!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
"but didn't you just contradict yourself? Gee, I don't know, an inflatable may weigh a couple of hundred pounds. A sailboat weighs a tiny bit more, don't you think?
"it's got sails, too" Yeah, and you're going to sail into a marina in 25 to 30 knots of wind? Seems you're a much better sailor than I. I'd probably wait it out, if I didn't have an engine.
How do all of you "sailing purists" up in the PNW some how manage to avoid all those high current areas while sculling your boats on windless days. Amazing seamanship, I guess!
i was actually thinking that the lighter inflatable would be more prone to being blown by the wind. once the heavier fixed keel sailboat is moving, i'd expect it to keep it's course better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
Here is a quick example of why learning to sail engine-less is so important. My first experience with the San Jaun's was also my first day of being a yacht broker in Wa, they were also a charter company and one of their boats had lost its transmission and had been towed to Friday Harbor. It was the last day of the charter and our company offered to have them towed out so they could sail home but they were not comfortable with it. I volunteered to sail it back and was taken to the airport and flown to Friday Harbor.

Flying over the San Juans was amazing. It was a 44' Beneteau if I remember correctly. I was towed about 300 yards out and left. I sailed it Solo back to its slip about 27 miles away. When I reached the harbor it was blowing over 20 knots I sailed into the harbor and into the slip with no problems. What a beautiful day :)

There are a hundred reasons an engine can fail, even on new boats. Having the skills and confidence to go on is very important and a real safety issue.
 
1 - 20 of 101 Posts
Top