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If it was me, I'd pull her and fix ASAP. If water is really coming from the crack, that could be a significant issue as it may mean that the hull is compromised.

The screws are less of an issue to fix.

Whether you need to today immediately or wait a few days, I think that you can wait a few days, but I would monitor and see how much water is coming in. If it is just a trickle, like a few gallons over 8 h, then a fully charged battery and a good bilge pump will be fine. I'd go down to the boat each day and drain the bilge into a secondary bucket. If you're getting a lot of water in, then you need to have it pulled ASAP.

I am surprised that the yard didn't catch this. When a yard typically splashes a boat, they put in and then wait a few minutes and then check all the thru-hulls and seacocks. My yard waited almost 20 minutes before they considered the boat ready to move away from the dock. They splashed me, moved me to the end of the dock and did a quick check to make sure water wasn't gushing in, moved me to the end of the lift dock, got the next boat on the truck and into the slings, came back and rechecked my boat, and then moved me away. After I was at my slip, they returned to the next boat and repeated the process.

DrB
 

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I don't like to use wood backing plates for below waterline

seacocks because of this very reason: Wood will eventually rot if kept wet and unprotected. A rotting base plate in a critical application can lead to a leak.

I would use a 3/8 to 1/2" thick fiberglass/epoxy plate instead. They are easy to make even with a curved contour and will be impervious to water, expand an contract similarly as the hull and strong enough to be through drilled and bolted.

DrB
 
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