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Bristol 24. The Stanchion plates are being replaced. Removed old ones. Bought Aluminum plates and drilled holes. Need to ensure they match up and then start putting the Stanchions back.

What is a good sealant? (I am not going to think about 5200 this time).
 

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Bedding compound was specifically designed for exactly that purpose; bedding hardware on a boat. It's cheap, easy to use and very easy to clean up.
 

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Just re-bedded a stanchion last weekend with Butyl Tape from Maine Sail. Went back this week after a nice couple healthy rainy days passed through, dry as a bone with no sign of intrusion. It's why I keep two rolls on hand.
 

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what is so special about butyl tape from maine sail versus that from home depot or west marine?

"After hundreds of requests for a high quality marine grade butyl tape I finally, through months and months of testing, landed on a tremendous formulation. Due to EPA regulation the good stuff from 30-40 years ago is long gone. To try and find a tape to survive the long term in the marine environment was not an easy task and took months of testing. After months and months going back and forth with my lab we finally landed on one. Bed-It Tape is gray in color, 1/16" thick and 1/2" wide and comes in a 50' roll. It is the perfect consistency & width for bedding deck hardware.

This is NOT the stuff you get from an RV supplier at all. This is closer, only a better quality because I was able to test specifically for a marine application, to what was used by boat builders back when they used to take the time to use a good quality butyl tape."

***Buy Bed-It Butyl Tape*** Photo Gallery by Compass Marine How To at pbase.com
 

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what is so special about butyl tape from maine sail versus that from home depot or west marine?
Bed-It Tape was formulated from the ground up as a bedding material for that specific use. I tested over 30 manufacturers and perhaps 60-70 "brands" from those manufacturers. None met what I wanted out of a bedding tape so I had to have it custom formulated. It is made here in the USA too..;)

Bed-It is specifically formulated to minimize creep/cold flow and has a significantly higher memory than "cheap" formulations that will fracture more easily. When hardware flexes and tape fractures water enters and makes re-seal very difficult. I wanted the best quality tape I could produce to handle the rigors of a marine application...

Many ask for white or off white and I have been working on that now for over three years. As of yet not one "white" formulation has passed my testing including multiple custom formulations from my lab. At about 7 or 8 now at the custom formulated level. I am getting closer but as of yet no cigar..

There are literally HUNDREDS of formulations of "butyl tape" out there and many products marketed as butyl tape that are not even butyl tape. I had to go straight to the lab and started from the ground up because the old excellent tapes of yesteryear are long gone due to EPA changes...


You can get Bed-It Tape at Hamilton Marine or on my own site...
 

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if your cheap you can use sikaflex 1a construction sealant...

its actually quite nice to use, doesnt smell so it works with rigging parts and wont corrode unlike other sealants...

only time will tell but Ive heard great longterm reports from other frugal cruisers...

but this would be recomended for parts where other sealants and bedding compunds arent available.

If I were in the states id be using butyl tape or bedding compound like capta says.
 

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Stanchions are subject to a lot of flex. I drank the coolaid about butyl tape, and last year I re-bedded mine with it. It has failed after a year. The butyl is no longer adhering to the deck and is letting water through.

I think you need a strong adhesive sealant for this application.

Another problem with butyl is that it looks like crap. It constantly attracts dirt, so the visible part is a dirty shade of dark grey, and oozes out slowly but continuously.

I just re-re-bedded the stanchions with Sikaflex 291 (adhesive polyurethane). I won't be using butyl tape again for any applications - back to liquid sealant.

You don't mention it, so I assume you haven't yet, but you should over-drill the holes in the deck, fill with epoxy, then drill holes through the epoxy. This seals the core so even if your bedding fails, no damage to the cure will result. Assuming you have a cored deck.
 

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yup potting is mandatory...

I used the cheap sikaflex only time will tell.

marks point should be noticed.

for example my jib car tracks are bedded from the factory with butyl tape. same for the aluminum toerails, they are fixed, dont flex assumed never to be removed in decades(they also dont have one drip of a leak in 45 years)

however stuff that flexes they used something else, and ID BET you its bedding compound or dolphinite or similar maybe in fact sealant.

I wouldnt be to critical of using 5200 here or similar...again I dont understand the complete damnation of satans glue

I think it has a bad rap cause people get it in their hair, complain that its so hard to take off when in my experience a razor does the same job for most any sealant.

in any case without starting a war I wouldnt see an issue using 5200 for stanchions or sikaflex etc...

but as mentioned you have options

cheers
 

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Stanchions are subject to a lot of flex. I drank the coolaid about butyl tape, and last year I re-bedded mine with it. It has failed after a year. The butyl is no longer adhering to the deck and is letting water through.

I think you need a strong adhesive sealant for this application.

Another problem with butyl is that it looks like crap. It constantly attracts dirt, so the visible part is a dirty shade of dark grey, and oozes out slowly but continuously.

I just re-re-bedded the stanchions with Sikaflex 291 (adhesive polyurethane). I won't be using butyl tape again for any applications - back to liquid sealant.

You don't mention it, so I assume you haven't yet, but you should over-drill the holes in the deck, fill with epoxy, then drill holes through the epoxy. This seals the core so even if your bedding fails, no damage to the cure will result. Assuming you have a cored deck.
Mark was this Bed-It Tape? If it kept oozing they were not tightened and seated appropriately or the wrong product was used.... This will allow too much movement and can allow water in between.. Were butyl cones used? Counter sunk?

Sabre has actually gone back to using butyl on stanchions from the factory.... I was on a Bristol a month ago that is nearly 40 years old, many of the stanchions were still bedded with the factory butyl and still dry...

The stanchions on my own boat were bedded at the factory 35 years ago and only three of them have been rebedded as of yet. Still dry. The boat has been 3/4 of the way around the world and has well over 70k nm on her.... I have never had to reseal a stanchion I bedded with Bed-It Tape and I do a fair amount of them........ Would love to know more about the application, torquing, what had previously been there. prep & was this Bed-It Tape etc......


EDIT:

This is where my frustration lies when companies jump on the band wagon and don't do any testing what so ever. They are simply reselling a low grade el-cheapo "butyl". I know the product they use, I have tested it. It failed my testing.... Some choose not to believe it but there are large differences in quality.

It is sad that butyl is getting a bad rap because a company chose not to do any research or testing on a product they chose to sell into the marine market. Beware there are others out there too that have jumped on the band wagon with low quality products..

I've been using the Sailrite stuff a lot of over the last year, and it seems fine. It is quite sticky, does not seem to dry out, and the colour is a very light grey - almost white.
 

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Yes I counter-sunked the holes, so it had cones around the holes. It is possible that I could have tightened up the bolts more, but I was put off by the oozing out of the butyl. Wouldn't that get worse if it was tighter? Or is the idea to go to full torque right away? I remember having to re-tighten the bolts several times over several weekends.

The tape I used was from Sailrite.
 

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Yes I counter-sunked the holes, so it had cones around the holes. It is possible that I could have tightened up the bolts more, but I was put off by the oozing out of the butyl. Wouldn't that get worse if it was tighter? Or is the idea to go to full torque right away? I remember having to re-tighten the bolts several times over several weekends.

The tape I used was from Sailrite.

Mark,

Your problem was the product chosen, and perhaps the application. The cones need to be wrapped on and kneaded into the threads then the fitting tightened in multiple small events until it stops oozing.

You bought Sikaflex for the re-bed. Would you buy a polyurethane bathroom caulk from Wal*Mart? Why not? This is essentially what you did buying your butyl.. Not your fault of course but what the end result was..

Without giving away trade secrets of the formulation the oozing (called cold flow) can be limited a lot by the formulation. If you stretch Bed-It Tape it has memory and wants to rebound back to itself. When pressed to 1/64" it also holds onto itself much longer before fracturing and allowing water to enter. This is all due to the specific formulation resulting from the testing procedures and jigs I built to execute the testing needed to come up with the formulation..

I worked into this from a "performance needs" approach not a "what can I resell and buy cheaply" angle. The tape was made to fit the application not the other way around.

Cheap tapes stretch and snap with little to no rebound. The temp range on cheap tapes also allows them to cold flow with temp changes. Bed-It is specifically formulated for this application to minimize these unfavorable side effects and yield better results than even the excellent quality pre-EPA tapes.
 

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why did you have to retighten the bolts several times? what backing plates did you use?
 

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The boat has fibreglass backing plates for the stanchions. They were always there, just re-used them.
 

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Stanchions are subject to a lot of flex.
Well, it they are, it's only because you are abusing them... :)

There is absolutely no reason that lifeline stanchions should be subject to repeated or significant 'flexing' in normal use... In anything short of an emergency situation, stanchions should never see any loads much beyond than the weight of the wire they are holding in place.

People hanging fenders from lifelines, grabbing onto lifelines and stanchions when boarding from the tender or a floating dock, lashing kayaks or jerry cans of diesel to them, and so on... that's where the real problem lies...

Even in sailing, you reap what you sow... :)
 

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Two of the stanchions are on each side of the gate in the lifelines. It is essential to hold on to these when boarding or leaving the boat.
 

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while I agree with jon, sometimes and the if and when will exert a lot of pressure on them...so for that reason use whatever you feel best t seal them...

I think the backing plate has a lot do with how much flex, not to mention what the deck is made of, cored or not...
 
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