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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Setting aside the fact that the SQ32 would be a questionable choice from a liveaboard perspective, how feasible would it be to electrify and cool one?

See attached plan.

1. Would the STB aft cabin be a suitable site for a generator, invertor, batteries etc? I presume the generator's cooling/exhaust requires a thru-hull arrangement?

2. Where would the air-con's outdoor condenser unit be located? I can't think of any suitable site deck-side.

Any suggestions, or is this idea DOA?
 

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With non AC/electric stoves/microwaves there should be little need for a generator even for a liveaboard.. Solar, good alternator & battery bank, and even a Fuel cell may well make more sense. Air conditioning, however, is probably another deal altogether..

One of the issues with today's trends towards 3 cabins in a 30something footer is an utter lack of usable storage/machinery space.. the Seaquest looks to be an good example of that. Could you sacrifice an entire cabin towards that? Probably, but why?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks Ron. I'm just exploring all the angles.

Summer temps peak at 50C in my neck of the woods. Even with deck covers when at berth, air-con is a necessity I'm afraid. The humidity gets pretty heavy too.

But can't have air-con without an outdoor unit. I'm stumped as to where that might be located. There's just no space on deck.

See attached photo (random grab). There's a potential site aft of the mast, atop the outer deck. Could easily fit a small condenser there. The roof may need reinforcement as it's probably not designed for that kind of permanent weight.

Could this work?
 

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We're in different worlds! ;) I'm much more concerned about cabin heat than A.C.

No idea beyond having seen AC units mounted in place of or into cabintop hatch openings - but watch for interference with essential sail controls like the vang...

btw.. are you an industrial controls guy? wondering about your username...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. I too thought the fwd hatch could be re-jigged as an air-con vent, but it would mean saying goodbye to the fwd cabin.

Aft of the mast is the only location I can see, but I'll have to 'install' a suitably sized cardboard box as a sample to make sure the condenser would not interfere with any essentials.

Did a brief stint in the air force, although the term is more relevant to orbital flight. I use it as a metaphor for change ; )
 

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Several options from cheap to very expensive:

1) Put a Sear household A/C in the companionway hatch, held by a plywood cut out, running power off the dock...cost about $500. When sailing it stores in the back cabin.

http://www.sears.com/appliances-air-conditioners/b-1202533079

2) When at anchor run the above off a Honda 2000...$500 + $1,000 for the Honda.

http://powerequipment.honda.com/generators/models/eu2000i

3) Fit a proper but modern integrated marine A/C unit like the Marinaire...Cost $1,500 plus the cost of a water cooling pump and a through-hull.

Manufacturer of quality marine air conditioning units and self contained marine air conditioners - Home

4) Again run off the dock power or a Honda 2000. Total cost for one unit with pump and haulout...$4,000

5) Do a very expensive marine generator installation giving up a cabin and spending $10,000-$15,000

Fischer Panda 4200 Plus Diesel Marine Generator

Over the years I have use all of the above methods...plus several hundred $ worth of fans.

On a small boat I would go to Sears!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you everyone for chipping in, esp. Yorksailor for the detailed list of options. All things considered, I'm moving beyond the Seaquest - fine, strong boat, but too small for what I have in mind.

Thanks!
 
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