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There must be some obvious reason not to do it since no one has mentioned it. But I have carried a spare diesel jug in my Anchor locker. It gets padded by two old type IV seat cushions and tied in using the eye bolts, it's doesn't budge. For a short coastal trip, I'll leave my Spade anchor secured on the bow. I have a Danforth in the stern. So there's no sharp anchor bits. The weight of the mostly nylon rode helps wedge it in.
 

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Tempest: I've just never owned a boat with an anchor locker large enough to consider that. James has the previous model Pearson 28 compared to mine (they don't have any parts in common) and maybe his anchor locker is larger. My anchor locker is quite shallow (about 6" to 8" deep) and won't fit anything beyond 300' of rode and a danforth-style anchor.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
The Pearson 28-1 has no real anchor locker. There is a small forecastle storage bay in which an anchor rode could be stored and accessed through a deck plate.

I took the anchor off the bow pulpit because it interfered with my sails. I also try to keep weight out of the ends of the boat, if at all possible. I try to keep as much weight in the middle, down low. With no quarterberth(s), aft head, or aft cabin, the P28-1 has large open lazarettes on each side of the inboard engine. That is where I store anchors and lines, fenders, and the battery bank. There is plenty of spare room left for additional storage.
 

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Have to agree with James here unless maybe, that anchor locker is very deep indeed and even then .... not happy.

Hey James .... (or anyone else for that matter) .... isn't a lazarette a stern locker ? Can you call side lockers (cockpit lockers ? ) side lazarettes ? Not trying to pick a fight though I'm possibly being a tadge pedantic.
 

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for what its worth I crossed the pacific and indian with a big ass 10 galon diesel jug in a locker inside my cabin...it was in a locker and was vented upwards...there was one on each side as well as 8 jugs on deck tied to the lifelines and 2 gas jugs for the dinghy

every once in a while it stunk and the fumes got old...but we lived through it jajaja

the boat we crossed on had a table in the middle of the cabin...

all around that were water jugs about 3 on each side tied to the feet of the table and covered with sumbrella covers...

cheers
 

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Fuel notes:
I have done several deliveries over the decades where we had some extra five gal. plastic containers on deck. Lashed them to lifelines with some padding on the lines to prevent chafe. Have them very near, if possible, to the deck fill fitting. Use a "rattle syphon" to transfer from from the container to the fill access. No spills. Works well.

And then, when considering the maximum that your boat's tank holds, in regard to your ocean motoring range....... always subtract about 3 to 5 gallons from the total to allow for the need to have some fuel in the bottom part of the tank.

When the boat is rolling around it's too easy for a very low fuel level to allow a slug of air to to enter the line and kill the engine. (Bleeding the injection system while the boat rolls wildly back n forth is no darned fun at all.)

As far as extra drinking water, I have had larger plastic tanks built that much better fit the areas designated for the original install. We took the boat from two tanks of 23 gallons each to two tanks holding about 62 gallons total. Having more than one tank and then using a manifold & valves to direct the delivery always lets us know when one is empty, and valving over to the other means it's time to consider resupply.
:cool:
Regards,
Loren
 
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