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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Tartan 27 on the Chesapeake that needs some deck repairs (soft spot around a stanchion). I also want to remove the stanchions and bases, paint the deck and replace stanchions with nice sized backing plates (just big washers on there now).

She's on the hard now and it's the slowest time of the year for my business, meaning an ideal opportunity to make repairs -- except for the weather. Doing a little research at the West Marine the other day, it looks like all the various boat paints and epoxies need a temperature of 50 degrees and above to cure properly.

Wondering if any of you out there have dealt with this and have any thoughts. I just want to get done as much as humanly possible before mid-March. For example, is there any disadvantage to sanding the deck months before painting? How about putting a huge tarp over the boat after painting to create a warming greenhouse effect?

I've just had the boat for a year and have much to learn, and would welcome any tips from the old salts out there.
 

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Freedom isn't free
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Paint is very finicky not just about temperatures, but also humidity, so a tarp will likely increase that as well.

Sanding well ahead of time is no worry...

I cheat this process by working indoors for winter, and a heater, but then my boat is trailerable too.
 

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I have an on the hard neighbor who builds a tarp covered shed around a different 50ft + power boat every year.
Preps and paints hull, top-sides and deck, repairs and replaces components as needed.

The shed in the spring ready for splash.

The shed is heated, lighted and ventilated with enough room to work around the boat.

3-4 months of work in climate controlled conditions produces a perfect finish for some very satisfied customers.

If you cannot build an enclosure to work in, you could do the prep then epoxy when the overnight and daytime temperature is right.
 

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I would say that unless you have a roof over your boat and some heat you, will have big problems with drying the old fiberglass of the area being repaired, not just curing the new epoxy. You can use heat lamps or hot air blowers on a decent day to do small fiberglass repairs.
 

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Don't they do shrink wrapping in your area? I believe it can be had in black, which would help absorb heat. I'd think a good shrink wrap job would give you a climate controlled work area.
 

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Where are you hauled? At Herrington Harbour north they can tent it and put in a heater to get the paint to dry properly. I would just wait until warmer temps.
 

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Barquito
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You may be surprised how long it takes to get all the deck hardware removed, and sand the deck to prep for painting. If you can tarp the boat, it may take a better part of the winter to get this done. Go ahead and open up the area that needs to dry out. Then look for other projects that need to get done. The sad fact is, that there are a lot of things that are difficult or impossible to do in cold conditions.
 

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That soft spot may take some surgery too. Epoxy, fiberglass, etc. I would only plan to get the prep work done over the winter, and finish the gluing and painting in the spring.

I also find that working in temps below 40 degs is a nightmare. If sunny, temps in the 40s are manageable, but not fun.
 

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There are still a few mild days before the end of the year in the Chesapeake area. Get your prep work done and cover with a tarp but leave some good air flow. The lower humidity during the winter will dry things out.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wow, I can't thank everyone enough for all the great advice and tips! The take home message here seems to be do all the prep work in the winter and do the final painting as soon as things warm up. The small soft spot repair I have I may try to do with using a space heater on a dry day in the 40s.... It's only about 18" square.
 
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