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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I sailed on this boat last weekend and we worked the main sail furling system.

It worked ok but I headed the boat into the wind with the engine and even then their was some winch work.

I get the feeling that the engine is necessary to control the boat heading in order to effectively furl the sail.

Is that correct or are their tricks to furl off the wind?

 

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I sailed on this boat last weekend and we worked the main sail furling system.

It worked ok but I headed the boat into the wind with the engine and even then their was some winch work.

I get the feeling that the engine is necessary to control the boat heading in order to effectively furl the sail.

Is that correct or are their tricks to furl off the wind?

Well, one 'trick' I've learned, is that whether it be in-boom, or in-mast furling, it's generally helpful to be actually able to SEE the sail you're attempting to furl.. :)

With all that canvas overhead, perhaps a remote camera mounted on the backstay, and a video display at the winch station, might be beneficial?

:)

Sorry, but are you asking about 'furling', or 'reefing'? If you're furling the main back into the mast, at that point wouldn't you normally have the engine running, anyway? In any event, I've found you usually get considerably less friction against groove of the mast, when headed directly to wind, if there's a breeze of any real strength...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry, but are you asking about 'furling', or 'reefing'? If you're furling the main back into the mast, at that point wouldn't you normally have the engine running, anyway? In any event, I've found you usually get considerably less friction against groove of the mast, when headed directly to wind, if there's a breeze of any real strength...
You are certainly correct that not being able to see the main made it very difficult to operate the sail.

I guess I was referring to reefing primarily but to furling if the engine was out and you wanted to run on jib alone.

You seem to concur that with that system the boat has to brought head to wind to relieve the pressure on the slot.

It is what it is and if that is the requirement then that is the way it has to be.
 

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We have an Oceanis 45 and either head into the wind with the engine on or if I want to leave the jib out, close reach and ease the main. We always use the winch. Never the electric.

The bimini has windows so at minimum the person at the helm can see the main while the other grinds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
We have an Oceanis 45 and either head into the wind with the engine on or if I want to leave the jib out, close reach and ease the main. We always use the winch. Never the electric.

The bimini has windows so at minimum the person at the helm can see the main while the other grinds.
Your exactly the kind of guy I want to talk to. Thanks for responding.

So you have been successful in reefing with the jib on a close haul and let the main sheet out till the main luffs?

Does that work for letting in and out.

What about in a fresh breeze?

Does it take you three people. One to grind, one to watch and one to release outhaul?

Can one person do the job?

Sorry about all the questions but I believe your experience is relative to this boat.

How long have you had your boat and how much sailing have you had with her?
 

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Your exactly the kind of guy I want to talk to. Thanks for responding.

So you have been successful in reefing with the jib on a close haul and let the main sheet out till the main luffs?

Does that work for letting in and out.

What about in a fresh breeze?

Does it take you three people. One to grind, one to watch and one to release outhaul?

Can one person do the job?

Sorry about all the questions but I believe your experience is relative to this boat.

How long have you had your boat and how much sailing have you had with her?
First year for the 45, had the 41 for the two previous seasons with the same system.

It's easy to reef, just head up enough to take off some of the load and use the winch.

Yep, without much load, easy in/out.

I've done it by myself, using the auto pilot. No problem. I can't imagine needing more than my wife and me.

We're out gunk holing every weekend since early April. Annapolis and St Michaels this weekend.

If not single handling, the person at the helm handles the out haul, in a breeze, with one wrap.

We've had in-masts on a 38, 41, 47 and now the 45. This Selden on this boat is easy.

Ask away if ya got more!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ask away if ya got more!
Thanks

They seem to have a switch on the mast.
Is it required that it be used or is it optional?
 

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The winch on the mast is mostly just a back up should the furling line break or come loose off the drum. You can also lock it so it can't unfurl if you have reefed. Though if you try to winch at the mast you may be surprised how much easier it is when you bypass all the blocks and such that the furling line runs through.

Loosening the vang can help with furling as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So are you saying that it can be left unlock all the time as long as you do not have the sail partially rolled up?
 

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So are you saying that it can be left unlock all the time as long as you do not have the sail partially rolled up?
You can do that. I like to put it in rachet when furling the sail so that if I lose control of the winch handle I don't end up with a broken thumb.
 

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davidpm if you look at the slot in your mast and the mainsail you will see that it furls counterclockwise. If you put the wind slightly on the starboard side (maybe 5-10 degrees) with the traveler centered you will notice that the wind will bow the sail around the slot in the mast and line it up better to furl. The worst thing I've seen people do is have the wind on the port side. The sail really has a lot of drag on the slot of the mast. With some practice you should be able to handle the mainsail by yourself with the autopilot engaged. On some boats I can still operate the winch while standing on the first step of the companionway so that I can better see the main.
 
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