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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are in the beginning stages of selling our boat and have had some discussions with a broker. In those discussions the broker asked whether I wanted to be present during the sea trial or would I prefer to just let the broker, surveyor and the potential buyer take the boat out by themselves. I asked why should that matter and she related that during the sea trial they might do things that I would be uncomfortable with, such as; run the engine at the high limit rpm, as they did on a recent test until the engine overheated and they had to shut it down; or they might raise all the sails completely even though it was blowing 30 knots as they cannot predict when the surveyor may be available to do the sea trial and ended up breaking something, maybe just a shackle that time.

So my questions is (as this is our first time selling a boat) is it normal to use the sea trial as a "stress" test of the integrity of a boat?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks all for your replies. My Clearwater 35 is unique enough (it is a swing keel and they only made 7 of these boats) that I feel I would need to be there just to show them how to operate some of the parts that they might not be familiar with. My question to the broker was, "whose insurance covers the boat if I am not operating it?" That is still an open question, for now. I can understand why it would be a disadvantage, to the sale of the boat, to have the owner on board (I would have to learn to keep my mouth shut and hide sometimes so the buyer could ask his tough questions of the surveyor).
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I certainly see the point (from the remarks made above) of the owner (me) not being there, but I would then want a qualified captain (someone I trusted and who would look after my interest in keeping everyone safe and keep the boat from harm) to take the boat out. The local broker says they work for me, not the seller; I don't think the buyer would bring their broker along, especially if from out of town. I would not have a problem of them running the engine at full RPM for a reasonable period, but really I think that in the sea trial you just want to show that the boat will reach or get close to hull speed under the conditions. Otherwise you can just run the engine at the dock. Same with raising the sails, if conditions allow then raise them to see their condition and how the boat behaves and sails. Under heavy weather a captain alone (who know what sailing experience the buyer, broker and surveyor have) might not be able to set full sails safely; I have done it only during race conditions when I had a full competent crew of at least 3 other people - yeah I know I am a sissy.

Again thanks for all the responses, I think I am coming to a position on the subject.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Again, thanks for the interest and all input to this thread. I have no issues with driving my boat hard, and I know how it behaves under heavy conditions. My 1990 Clearwater 35' , with a swing keel and rudder, is one of only 7 made, they were built sturdy in Bristol, RI; one of the 7 has circumnavigated. So it is nearly a one off and I feel I would need to spend some time with a substitute captain to get him up to speed. My approach would be to test my boat now, before I have a customer, thru the possible high power conditions to uncover any issues. Nominally, she runs great as I replaced the mixing elbow and had a new serpentine belt system installed recently, so the only issues might relate to the, recently rebuilt, MaxProp settings.

That being said, I do understand that I am very attached to this boat, as only its second owner, and (from this discussion) I have learned that I need to prepare myself to be able to remain apart from any discussion that takes place during the sea trial. Yet, I do want to present the boat in its best light without imposing my self on the potential buyer.

I am early in sale process, so I have time to work on my subtle communication skills.

thanks,
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
I am scheduling my engine mechanic to check out the engine and do annual maintenance sometime in the next few weeks. My Yanmar 3GM30 has 3400 stamped on the front label as its max RPM. Normally, I run around 2800 RPM to exercise the engine in open water. I had other things going on today, so tried running just at the dock. I ran it up to 3400 RPM today, out of gear at the dock, and had no issues, it ran fine; except it started sucking mud up from the creek bottom (the creek is only 4 feet deep so I have about only 2 ft under the hull - advantage of the swing keel design), so I backed down. I tried running WOT with the 3 blade Max Prop engaged at the dock and it would not reach 3400, only got to 3000 RPM, but it did expose a faulty dock line cleat which the screws bent and eventually pulled out of a rotted section of the pilling. Fortunately I had multiple lines on the boat. None of this exercise caused anything strange in engine motion, cooling or vibration other than more noise. the new serpentine belt system hummed along smoothly.
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I think I will be ok with a future Sea Trial test, but I will ask the mechanic to make sure.

thanks for all the discussion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
I should try this again on open water, I guess if I cannot reach the rated RPM it may mean that the MaxProp settings are too high, and I am over propped. If I can only get to 3000 out of 3400, should that be a big enough issue that I should adjust the MaxProp settings? I had the MaxProp rebuilt a few years and had a discussion with the engineer at PYINC and he recommended the current setting based on my boat specifications. I will wait until I actually try this and perhaps start a new discussion based on that question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #84 ·
Reference the cleat, I had the boat tied to pilings on both sides at the bow and the stern, but I also had a midship line to this cleat that I used to pull the boat over to the dock. When I put the boat in reverse I did not realize that all the load went to that line first. The area around the cleat bolts was partially rotted and so the cleat just ripped out of the piling. As you said, not surprising, except to me at the time.

I plan to run my WOT test again on open water soon, to see if that resolves the max RPM issue. I have in my notes, somewhere, what speed I can reach at what RPM on a calm, day. I also roughly determined how much fuel I use at the lowest setting to reach around 7 knots which is hull speed for a water line length of 29.6 ft. But this changes based on sea and hull conditions (recently cleaned vs dirty), so it is hard to repeat.

Anyway thanks again for the discussion.
 
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