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I'm selling my current boat, no broker involved. If a prospective buyer wants to have it surveyed, how should that be handled? What should I have written up before I allow the yard to lift the boat? My concern is, how do I make sure the prospective buyer pays the yard? If he stiffs the yard, they would expect me to pay... I will either take it to the yard myself or accompany the buyer. This is my first big boat sale, any advice is appreciated........

Rich
 

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Generally, a contract to purchase the boat is completed and an escrow deposited before a survey. The survey represents a serious commitment to buy the boat. The cost of the survey and yard is paid by the buyer. The terms of the escrow state that any payments owed by the buyer that are not covered will come out of the escrow. This is what will protect you from the yard. If they buyer walks away from the purchase and doesn't pay the yard, you pay with his money out of the escrow.

Since you don't have a broker or escrow service involved, you will need to draw up an escrow contract agreeable to the buyer where you hold the money with the terms of returning or keeping spelled out. We have done it this way for purchasing 3 boats and selling 2.

Mark
 

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You are not going to let him pull the boat until you have a signed contract. The contract should specify the purchase price, the equipment included in the sale, and a date by which the purchaser has to have his survey completed and the sale closed. That contract should also have a clause that obligates him to pay the haul out fees.
 

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Agreed. Written contract, 10% escrow and right of offset. Among many other agreements, includes specific dates things must be done by. No deal gets better with age, especially discretionary purchases. Keep it moving along.

You will, however, retain fully liability for the boat, until their final check clears. If it fell out of the travel lift slings, the prospective buyer walks away and you deal with the marina.
 

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Buyer is contracting with both yard and surveyor for haul out, your only obligation is delivery of boat to yard. Your boat but his survey. Surveyor will probably do static inspection and sea trial either before or after haul. I usually arrange for a "lunch time" haul for surveys, you are last hauled before workers go to lunch and leave you in the slings for an hour then launch. Usually cheaper that way.
 

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Usually a sale survey is a "lift and hold" at which the surveyor checks the bottom for condition and paint, the thru hulls, shaft and cutlass bearing and the prop. Also checks condition of the zincs and any blistering of the hull or keel dings.
It takes less than a hour and is a good chance for photos and observation by owner. Cost is usually less than $400 since the yard won't unsling or put the boat in a cradle. Since it is at the buyers request, he pays both the yard and the surveyor.
 

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A boat bill of offer (likewise called a boat buy understanding) is a report used to detail the provisions of an exchange between a confidential dealer and purchaser. It's an agreement well defined for a boat deal, and can be utilized for a controlled or unpowered boat for however long it isn't likewise a U.S. Coast Guard reported vessel enlisted by the U.S. government as opposed to named and numbered by a state (there are independent structures for selling a recorded vessel). In certain states, a boat bill of offer may not be expected to finish the deal, however utilizing one is really smart as it gives evidence of the subtleties of the exchange. In the event that the boat has a title — by and large expected in many states for boats in excess of 16 feet long — that title will in any case should be moved from the vender to the purchaser per state guidelines.
 
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