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bell ringer
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4,768 Posts
I like my boat, but don’t LOVE it. I like cruising and sailing, but again wouldn't say I LOVE.

I have a plan to sell the boat and move on to other things before I physically break down. I just haven't set any kind of date for this yet.
 

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Old soul
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4,509 Posts
I like my boat. What I love is the lifestyle. My boat enables this lifestyle, but there are other ways to achieve the same things. So, I have no plans to sell, but to paraphrase one of the greats (Lin Pardey):

I'll keep cruising as long as it's fun ... or until something better comes along.
 

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Registered
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1,595 Posts
Back to Capta's question: when buying my boats, I sort of think about what happens when I don't want the boat anymore (too old, too bored, too dead, etc.). I determined that I wouldn't pay more for the boat than I would mind losing completely. I don't intend to die aboard, but I can't imagine not having a boat.
 

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dadio917
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326 Posts
interesting topic. here's my take....I don't think of it as a boat. I think of it as boats, with a big S on the end. We love our current boat. bought her to sail the ocean, which we did and she did with style. We've used her much more than any other boat we saw in the places we've been to. Fixed her up too...spared no expense. But we're done with the ocean so she's on the market for someone else to do ocean. but we're now maniacally looking for another trailer sailor to sail our lake and anyplace else. Also looking to charter Croatia later in the year. So, done with coastal and crossing oceans so time for a new love.
 

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Freedom isn't free
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2,947 Posts
Bought my Capri 14.2 thought I'd have it forever, had it for 10 years.
Bought my Capri 22, and almost bought a capri 25 when I did... I spent all my ownership days wondering about selling the 22.

I finally bought a Capri 25, and loved that boat, put a ton of work in it, spent most of my time thinking about what I would do if I wanted to upgrade to something bigger. Wasn't sure anything bigger would work since I was on a lake that meant we had to be able to haul it ourselves and step the mast ourselves. I considered a lot of boats, Benteau 285 made the list, as did a Catalina 27 Tall. Ironically I bought an S2 7.9 mostly to prove I could be competitive with the boat the biggest winnners of our club racing used. I did well with that boat.

I was never happy with the S2, if felt boring to me. Ironic, it was a very fast boat.

I sold the S2, thinking I'd get a J27 or J92... Nothing fit it all fell through. I wound up buying a Wavelength 24, and it was probably the best setup boat I owned. Every month I owned it, even when I was winning races, I wanted somethign different... never thought I'd be able to sell it, but I knew I wanted to.

Flash forward, I own an C&C 32, I love the boat, and its what I wanted, and I bought it for as long as I am on the lake. I am tweaking it for me, but I know the resale on the C&C is good, so getting rid of it should be really easy :)
 

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Senior Member
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11,853 Posts
Bought my Capri 14.2 thought I'd have it forever, had it for 10 years.
Bought my Capri 22, and almost bought a capri 25 when I did... I spent all my ownership days wondering about selling the 22.

I finally bought a Capri 25, and loved that boat, put a ton of work in it, spent most of my time thinking about what I would do if I wanted to upgrade to something bigger. Wasn't sure anything bigger would work since I was on a lake that meant we had to be able to haul it ourselves and step the mast ourselves. I considered a lot of boats, Benteau 285 made the list, as did a Catalina 27 Tall. Ironically I bought an S2 7.9 mostly to prove I could be competitive with the boat the biggest winnners of our club racing used. I did well with that boat.

I was never happy with the S2, if felt boring to me. Ironic, it was a very fast boat.

I sold the S2, thinking I'd get a J27 or J92... Nothing fit it all fell through. I wound up buying a Wavelength 24, and it was probably the best setup boat I owned. Every month I owned it, even when I was winning races, I wanted somethign different... never thought I'd be able to sell it, but I knew I wanted to.

Flash forward, I own an C&C 32, I love the boat, and its what I wanted, and I bought it for as long as I am on the lake. I am tweaking it for me, but I know the resale on the C&C is good, so getting rid of it should be really easy :)
She’s big enough to keep on the Chessie and do some bigger sailing as well as spend weekend on her or take a couple vacations like we do each year.
 

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Senior Member
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11,853 Posts
Of course ....it’s a C&C....😄😄😄😄🌪🌪🌪🌪
 

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Dirt Free
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2,654 Posts
I know two people who called it quits when they realized they could never be independent again.

I hope I have that courage when I can no longer handle the boat myself as I have no interest in a life on dirt.
 

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Registered
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4,953 Posts
The OP raises so many issues here. The main one I suppose is that everyone has a completely different set of circumstances, values, goals and how they chose to live their lives.

Most people follow most of the well worn paths in life... get an education, work which pays well enough to live well and save for a a future... which often means/includes passing assets / inheritance on to your offspring or partner, and money to pay for your lifestyle when you stop working for whatever reason. So most people maintain "investments" for this purpose.

A common element on SN is members incorporate sailing as a large component on their lives. And there are many ways to sail... day sailing, racing, weekend cruising, long term and distance cruising, part time use or full time live aboard and all manner of permutations. Some are professionals... run charters or are mechanics and so on. So clearly there is no right answer or path here... each one will be what works for each sailor and their circumstance. There will be common paths but likely no identical ones.

++++

I began sailing in mid life. I was essentially single as I had divorced and had no children. I was self employed and had made come money which sat in a bank. I was not thinking about heirs or even retirement at the time. My father had recently died after working his whole life without a retirement. Why wait until you're too old to do the things you want to do?

My "discovery" of sailing was complexly accidental. I had no exposure until very shortly before I bought Shiva which is the only boat I have ever owned and still do since August 1985. Since I was completely new... sailing seemed to me, at the time, like I was opening a door into a previously unseen and unknown universe/ It felt similar to how I felt as a college freshman entering architecture school to learn a profession I had chosen to do for my "work" in life. Like architecture... sailing would have to be "mastered". I loved the idea of taking in a new "discipline" and so "late" in life. I knew there was a lot to learn. So I began my studies which included books, and courses and of course real time experience with the boat I bought.

Clearly buying a "serious" boat without a knowledge base was risky. I had no experience to inform my decision... just books and advice from a trusted friend who sailed... and my own gut response to what I saw in the boat.

The decision included the idea of getting a boat I could:

aail single hand and therefore short hand
do well in ocean passages
comfortable to live aboard
afford to purchase, outfit and maintain

I spent Spring 85 and part of Summer looking until I found the 36s. I was in full learning mode. When I closed I was faced with hands on experience learning how to sail.... and what to do for upgrades.... I had to learn to care for a diesel... I was not someone who messed with cars or motorcycles. No interest in such things.

As the first years ticked off I was in a full immersion mode. I spent all my waking hours in learning mode aside from doing my work. And I realized how this boat was a perfect match for me. I suppose it's sort of like falling in love and getting hitched.

I realized that my social life would be radically different living on a boat and even more so in new and unfamiliar places. I wanted a partner to share the experience and be into it as much as I was. I knew this was a long shot... but I kept one eye open. When the decision was made for my "sabbatical" I left single and unattached. Pretty hard to hook up with a woman of the "right age" who was unencumbered and not into her career to take off and live on a sailboat. I did meet several interesting ladies along the way... but no "keepers" as expected.

My "sailing sabbatical" did not disappoint. I had all sorts of experiences I never would have had as an architect in NYC with a sailboat in LI. I met remarkable people and have great memories. I became a very competent sailor of MY boat. And I did some deliveries of other boats. Not something I enjoy as much as my own... but I made some money and chalked up experience.

I decided to "return" to civilization to pursue a business idea which came to me sitting in the cockpit of my then girlfriend's boat in the Canary Islands. It was a boat related idea and something that I needed to try to make happen but not in the Canary Islands.

I returned to NYC and lived aboard in LIS Sound, got a car and worked on the project development/business plan for about a year. I cruised locally and at one point almost sold the boat when it was on the hard in winter storage and I was living in a small apartment with my new GF who became my wife. Business plan did not get funded... and we decided to not sell and use the boat and have been doing so since the late 90s. Wifey is not a sailor and doesn't want to be. But she does love the boat, being on it and visiting places. It's our summer home, and our vacation.

I am so used to having this as part of my life... selling the boat would be like selling my left arm. I have had this boat half my life.... more than any other material thing I own... this boat as been with me.

I can sell the boat and get tens of thousands of dollars. I can't take them to the grave... wifey will get them if she outlives me as she likely will. Or she can sell the boat on my passing. As long as we can use and enjoy the boat we keep it as it's our home. And we do love being there.... and there is where ever the anchor sets.

I would the next owner/caretaker to be someone who appreciates and loves her as I have... though that is impossible. To next owner she will be just a well found and well cared for good sailing old sailboat. But who knows... maybe the next owner will fall in love as I did.

You don't sell what you love and what has "cared for" you for decades through calm seas and gales.

Love song for Shiva:

 

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Freedom isn't free
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2,947 Posts
Chef, no doubt the C&C 32 would be great on the Chessie.

In fact I can't help but wonder how well I'd have loved to sail the boat in the BVIs. The finer bow entry and the fin keel and frankly the entire cockpit is better setup for a couple to cruise on than that beautiful Oceanis 35 we were on. Sorry the C&C just sails better. That stubby keel and twin rudders of the Bendy toe made it hate heel and the wide/square stern and blunt bow made it bounce more than I'd want for a personal choice boat.

The Oceanis had bigger water tankage, and had engine hot water, both things I could do on my C&C, but then the Oceanis was supposed to be 3 feet bigger, just didn't feel it to me.

Yeah if I were to venture to larger waters, with some equipment upgrades, I'd not hesitate to take this C&C. She is very sea kind and stands up to heavier winds nicely. But reality is within me, and I know I am likely landlocked for the foreseeable future. I have roughly 18 more years of work (I'm 48), but I still want to sail in the meantime. So I'm a lake sailor - for now.

We have 2 horses and 8 dogs, and do competition with our dogs from horseback (although not the last 2 years due to career changes for us both), most of that doesn't play well with spending days at a time on the water. Someone has to watch animals. We used to have my grown son and his wife watching animals when we lived in PA, but now they are in PA and we're in VA, and we don't have that "luxury." They are talking about moving down our way, so who knows.

Right now the C&C is probably overkill for our lake. But 30 minutes drive in the car... walk 100 feet down the dock, hop aboard and sailing in minutes. Ain't nothing wrong with that. I'm loving that my boat can be in the water 24x7x365 too. This one is due for a short haul, clean and bottom touch up though. In due time.
 

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Senior Member
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11,853 Posts
Chef, no doubt the C&C 32 would be great on the Chessie.

In fact I can't help but wonder how well I'd have loved to sail the boat in the BVIs. The finer bow entry and the fin keel and frankly the entire cockpit is better setup for a couple to cruise on than that beautiful Oceanis 35 we were on. Sorry the C&C just sails better. That stubby keel and twin rudders of the Bendy toe made it hate heel and the wide/square stern and blunt bow made it bounce more than I'd want for a personal choice boat.

The Oceanis had bigger water tankage, and had engine hot water, both things I could do on my C&C, but then the Oceanis was supposed to be 3 feet bigger, just didn't feel it to me.

Yeah if I were to venture to larger waters, with some equipment upgrades, I'd not hesitate to take this C&C. She is very sea kind and stands up to heavier winds nicely. But reality is within me, and I know I am likely landlocked for the foreseeable future. I have roughly 18 more years of work (I'm 48), but I still want to sail in the meantime. So I'm a lake sailor - for now.

We have 2 horses and 8 dogs, and do competition with our dogs from horseback (although not the last 2 years due to career changes for us both), most of that doesn't play well with spending days at a time on the water. Someone has to watch animals. We used to have my grown son and his wife watching animals when we lived in PA, but now they are in PA and we're in VA, and we don't have that "luxury." They are talking about moving down our way, so who knows.

Right now the C&C is probably overkill for our lake. But 30 minutes drive in the car... walk 100 feet down the dock, hop aboard and sailing in minutes. Ain't nothing wrong with that. I'm loving that my boat can be in the water 24x7x365 too. This one is due for a short haul, clean and bottom touch up though. In due time.
Understand. I am 17 years older. The children responsibilities will change. I went through that phSe also. Good you have a boat you really like. Our 35 required some addition to go on a three week cruise.

Water tankage was one, but easily figured out. In fact we have two tanks each 60 gallons, the original one and and a nitrile one which we only fill when we need to. Both connected by a simple valve. Most of the time we have its extra space as 60 gallons is more than enough for a 3 day weekend on the Bay.

Maybe in the future you will downsize a little so you can enjoy your boat in a different setting. You still live within range to go to your boat on a Friday night or Saturday AM for a weekend. We let the animals dwindle down and will get dogs when we stop sailing. Using the boat out in the open and anchoring is a whole different use. Plus you are close to an area for that. You aren’t in Kansas.

Hopefully your 32 is what you can live with so you can really so upgrades. We’ve owned our 35 for 28 years of its 36 yer life.
 

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If I ever became a solo cruiser I'd downsize to something in the 28-32 range. The perfect size for one, although I know a family of three who spends weeks a time on their C&C 32 and does just fine. Nice boats.
Well Mike my 26’ Hake Yacht is for sail. Blue water tuff with a 900# winged bowed keel with inboard diesel With only 257 hours....she’s so sweet. Has trailer!
561-281-5205
$22,000
 

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Old soul
Joined
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4,509 Posts
Well Mike my 26’ Hake Yacht is for sail. Blue water tuff with a 900# winged bowed keel with inboard diesel With only 257 hours....she’s so sweet. Has trailer!
561-281-5205
$22,000
Thanks Hittner. It looks like a sweet little cruising boat. And with the trailer included, it sounds like a good deal. But luckily I'm not a solo sailor, and it doesn't appear I will be any time soon. That's why I said "If I ever became..."

But I'm sure someone will love your boat. Good luck.
 
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