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60w of solar is barely going to make a dent in the power requirements of an electric outboard motor. Your outboard probably used 300w to 1000w when in operation. If it is 300w (under half a horsepower) then you would need 5 hours of full sun (that is effectively a full day when it comes to solar) to make up for one hour of outboard operation. If it is 900w (a little over 1hp) you would need 15 hours of sun to make up for 1 hour of outboard use.

Electric outboards are great for day sailors, but if you use the boat regularly a shore power charger is a must.
 

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Would there be an experimental way to find out? I suppose I could deliberately shade one panel and see how fast it charges.
A battery monitor (or even just an amp meter) will do the job and give you a good idea of how much charging you are getting out of the system.

On my 30w panel if I shade one cell in bright sunlight the charging drops from over 2 amps to under 1 amp. If I shade two cells my amperage falls so low as to be nearly useless. This is with a Genasun MPPT.
 
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