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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have six (6) sextants for sale! Prices on the Tamayas are negotiable; other prices are firm.

La Filotecnica Salmoiraghi, ca. 1940 - SOLD

W. Gerrard of Liverpool, 19th Century Sextant, Cased - $625

Tamaya Marine Navigation Jupiter MS-833 Sextant with Light and 4x40 Scope - SOLD

Tamaya Marine Navigation Spica MS-733 Sextant with Light and 4x40 Scope - SOLD

David White Mark II Sextant - US Navy, 1945 - SOLD

Henry Hughes & Son Marine Sextant - 1920 - SOLD

S/H would be for a 16" x 16" x 8" box, 8-13 lbs (weight varies depending on sextant), shipped from zip code 47401. Include $10 to cover insurance and signature confirmation.
 

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Rafiki 37 hull #55
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Just curious... are older sextants desirable for their antique value, or are there perceived functional advantages over sextants of new manufacture?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just curious... are older sextants desirable for their antique value, or are there perceived functional advantages over sextants of new manufacture?
Mostly for antique value, especially if it can be tied to a famous ship or person.

There's probably a slight technical advantage, given the use of aluminum and better glass -scopes and mirrors - in modern models.

However, a person very adept at using a sextant would likely get very similar results with either (barring some unknown issue, such as wear in an antique sextant).
 

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Speaking of sextants. I have an old Astra III. Where would one send it to be sure it's working properly. I know how to use it (very rusty), I just don't know how to confirm what it says is correct. It's been kicked around (in it's box) in the back of a closet for years. I think I'm going to need it next year for a navigation certificate I'm going to be required to get.
 

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Moody 376
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Where would one send it to be sure it's working properly. I know how to use it (very rusty), I just don't know how to confirm what it says is correct.
In theory, could you go out to a field or another place where you have good a good horizon and run the numbers and see what you come up with. and then if you have a smart phone with a navigation app, take a look at what it says. then compare notes...
 

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In theory, could you go out to a field or another place where you have good a good horizon and run the numbers and see what you come up with. and then if you have a smart phone with a navigation app, take a look at what it says. then compare notes...
I was teaching Marjorie how to take a compass bearing on her apartment balcony in France.
3 back bearings: a tall radio/microwave mast; an electrical sub-station supplying 50,000 people; a nuclear power station.

The neighbours called the police!!


:(
 

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1987 Cape Dory MKII hull #3
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I was teaching Marjorie how to take a compass bearing on her apartment balcony in France.
3 back bearings: a tall radio/microwave mast; an electrical sub-station supplying 50,000 people; a nuclear power station.

The neighbours called the police!!


:(
do not think had anything to do with taking bearings, you look suspicious, will have done the same!
 

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I have six (6) sextants for sale! Prices on the Tamayas are negotiable; other prices are firm.

La Filotecnica Salmoiraghi, ca. 1940 - $250

W. Gerrard of Liverpool, 19th Century Sextant, Cased - $625

Tamaya Marine Navigation Jupiter MS-833 Sextant with Light and 4x40 Scope - make offer

Tamaya Marine Navigation Spica MS-733 Sextant with Light and 4x40 Scope - make offer

David White Mark II Sextant - US Navy, 1945 - $250

Henry Hughes & Son Marine Sextant - 1920 - $200

S/H would be for a 16" x 16" x 8" box, 8-13 lbs (weight varies depending on sextant), shipped from zip code 47401. Include $10 to cover insurance and signature confirmation.

I would take $2,750 for all six, S/H included (CONUS only), or $2,400 plus S/H outside of the USA.
Hi,
That is a nice collection! One day I would like to upgrade my AstraIII (CH version) to a Tamaya or C. Plath. Sorry, not this time. You maybe find more interested customers in one of the several Facebook groups about celestial navigation; there is always someone selling theirs and they find easily a buyer. Hope this helps.

Out of curiosity, how do you end up with such a collection?
 

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Speaking of sextants. I have an old Astra III. Where would one send it to be sure it's working properly. I know how to use it (very rusty), I just don't know how to confirm what it says is correct. It's been kicked around (in it's box) in the back of a closet for years. I think I'm going to need it next year for a navigation certificate I'm going to be required to get.
I think someone in the Boston area repairs/calibrates sextants.
But if it wasn't been used, store properly and the frame/gear rack aren't damage, then pretty sure you probably only need to check and adjust the mirrors a little (index and side error). Then go outside to take a sight from the sun at noon and ... do the math!
 

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In theory, could you go out to a field or another place where you have good a good horizon and run the numbers and see what you come up with. and then if you have a smart phone with a navigation app, take a look at what it says. then compare notes...
No. You need a true horizon. Only the sea can provide it. Sure you can practice your technique in the field, but you won't be able to determine your position.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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No. You need a true horizon. Only the sea can provide it. Sure you can practice your technique in the field, but you won't be able to determine your position.
You can find your position if you use an artificial horizon and know your height above sea level. It is the same correction as taking your site from the the bridge of a ship vs the deck of a sailboat.
 

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You can find your position if you use an artificial horizon and know your height above sea level. It is the same correction as taking your site from the the bridge of a ship vs the deck of a sailboat.
True. You can do it with an artificial horizon. But in my (limited) experience with them, they are not easy to work with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi,
That is a nice collection! One day I would like to upgrade my AstraIII (CH version) to a Tamaya or C. Plath. Sorry, not this time. You maybe find more interested customers in one of the several Facebook groups about celestial navigation; there is always someone selling theirs and they find easily a buyer. Hope this helps.

Out of curiosity, how do you end up with such a collection?
I do a lot of buying and selling online. I'm on SSDI (very bad back; my 5th spinal fusion 6 weeks ago) and that's how I get my fun money.

As a veteran of the Navy (Machinist's Mate), I have a soft spot for nautical gear.
 
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