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That's the problem with production knobs. They just don't build 'em like they used to. 'Better give the jewels a rest for a while . How about a thin SS strap ,(about 4 inches wide)U shaped with eye ring on one leg. Open door, slip over edge, close door.most doors have enough clearance. Be sure the door opens away or the lacerations could be severe when someone comes thru.
 

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I know I'm coming in a bit late here but I've attached a couple of photos of the coupler you have that might help visualize what you are dealing with. Mine is attached to the Hurth transmission on my 5416 engine.

As you can see on the transmission side there is a kind of cross arrangement that the bolts pass through. on the blue coupler you can see a circular lip, that engages the inside of the "pads" on the end of the cross arms. That is a pretty tight fit if I remember right, even without it being rusted solid. I think I just used a thin metal wedge tapped in between the flange and each of the cross piece arms to separate them.

Don't use heat on this coupler unless you are prepared to replace it. The big bolts on the outside pass through rubber bushes that will be ruined by heating.

HTH
Eric
 

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Good info Eric.. I suspect you've nailed the issue. Once the oarsman isn't walking bowlegged that should help him out.. the power of the wedge may well be the trick.

Oarsman.. I'm happy to say I don't 'feel your pain'... but you have my sympathies and thanks for sharing.. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Thanks for the tips and humor! They certainly brought a smile. I'm well on the road to recovery, and should be able to get back on the boat after another week or two.

Eric - those pics are super helpful, and, though your arrangement is much cleaner, looks like mine! Do the cross arms grip that coupler lip at all? Or do they just sort of rest on it. Back when I was in the laz working on it, I tried putting my thin pry (actually, a thin steel putty knife) in between the coupler and the flange arm and giving the pry some light taps, but couldn't get the wedge into the seam - I assume because of the corrosion. Did you have a similar experience? Just wondering what you meant by the lip engaging the cross arms of the flange. Thanks!
 

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Just guessing here but thinking that the cross arms are centered in the unit by the lip. Methinks a bit of engish on the handle of a big screwdriver could set things moving.
 

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The arms don't look very strong and probably bent pretty easy so be very careful. A disc shaped coupler would be a lot stronger, but all the smaller Hurths and maybe the big ones too use this type. Mines never gotten stuck so bad the a very light tap didn't break it loose.
 

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Oarsman,

Great to hear you are on the mend, and thanks for sharing your adventure with the doorknob. It took me while to get off the floor when I read it, before trying to give a serious answer to your engine problem. Glad you could see the humor in spite of the pain ?

To your questions, the inside lip on each of the four cross arms has been machined to match the outside of the circular lip on the coupler. It's a tight fit. On the photo of the coupler you can see the shiny spots where the cross arms meet the coupler face and lip.

I have a very thin wedge that is about 5 inches long, 1 1/2 inches wide and tapers from about 3/8 inch down to almost zero. It's made of hardened steel, my old journeyman gave me it when I was an apprentice about 30 years ago. He called it a "fox wedge", and it has saved my bacon on a few occasions over the years. So it's much thinner than a screwdriver tip, and the taper is very gradual. It would be easy to make one with a bit of steel bar and a bench grinder. I tapped it in to each of the 4 meeting points in turn, a little at a time. I soaked them in PB Blaster beforehand.


Get well soon
Eric
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Success!

Thanks for all the help throughout this process, everyone. A couple of weeks ago, after months of applying penetrating oil, the prop shaft slid free with a gentle tap from a 'fox wedge' :). Yesterday, I painted the bottom and had some extra time to lift the engine out!

The water jackets in the manifold are visibly split - though I think this might have been the result of trying to free the epoxied-in manifold bolts with a blowtorch, as I inspected the business end of the manifold pretty closely with bright lights back in April as I cut gaskets to fit it and applied RTV to it, and it was fine then. The corrosion between the head and the block is strong enough to hold the engine entirely suspended without any supporting bolts (I put the remaining bolts in with a half-inch gap as insurance in case the head and block did separate).

To get her out, I levered the front up with a chain hoist and a chain between the two front mounts, slid some two by fours under, and then it was an easy job of hauling her forward (while keeping the rear mounts on the tracks) until I could pull her out all the way with the hoist. The wood beam I had the hoist connected to slid easily along the companionway top, so I could easily reposition the engine on to the railroad ties I had set out.

Next - lifting the engine into my truck with the main halyard, fixing the shaft in place, and splashing! Thanks again for all the help in preserving the shaft while getting rid of the engine!
 

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