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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I currently looking at a used Tartan (26yrs old) and have a few hangups, the first BIG one being that propeller shaft is corroded between the engine and the stuffing box and saltwater has given it that bright blue hue. Could be caused by lack of maintenance on the stuffing box, or the engine is out of alignment.

Now I've seen what saltwater does to metals and usually at this stage I would think the shaft is compromised and certainly not capable of a long voyage without the risk of more damage/failure, however I'm wondering if something like this be salvaged or if it needs to be replaced.

Here are the photos of the shaft from inside the boat and outside the boat. It looks fantastic from the outside and like new which is weird. But the inside is a nightmare. AFAIK this shaft is one piece (direct drive) so would need haul-out to remove and replace. And might even need to drop the rudder but would need measurements as the engine is mounted more towards the middle of the boat to be certain.

Outside of calling a Marine mechanic (which would be my next move) curious if anyone here has done this procedure, the cost, and know what might be involved with a job this size. Anyway here are the photos:

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0Bx6tzmnoism-M245cmprMGZMblk&usp=sharing
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That blue color, verdigris, is not an indication of a problem. That can happen to copper alloys simply out in the air. Can be polished off if you like. I would leave it. Doesn't mean there isn't some other problem though.

Related comment: Replacing prop shafts is a normal thing on boats. You need to expect this kind of work if you are messing about in boats. Also, a haul-out is not actually required to replace most prop shafts, but it sure helps.
I knew the "blue stuff" had a name. And reassuring that it's not an obvious sign of potential failure. Very helpful thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That shaft log needs some serious cleaning up as do the flange bolts. If you ever need to adjust the packing or get the shaft disconnected to realign, etc., it will be a task. ...Maybe replace the flange bolts and nuts and put some anti-seize on em when reinstalling.
Good thoughts. The flange is quite rusted, and shaft does look flaky. Always hard to judge unless in-person. these were photos from the broker.
 
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