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37' Pearson
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks,
I have started to think about a live aboard option in the bahamas, a co-worker fellow wind lover suggested exploring this forum option, so here I am.

I have loved sailing for meany a year and my partner, well she wants a water view.
Living on the West coast of Canada, our back yard has some amazing sailing adventures to be had. The one thing I am planning on doing is to head to the Bahamas and have a good look at the locations, amentias and communities that exist in and around Georgetown or possible other locations.

That the Coel's Notes version for me, any insight would be very welcome.
 

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Super Moderator
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Sounds like you have a plan and a supportive partner: two good things. A Pearson 37 may draw more than some would prefer for the Bahamas, but there are still lots of places you could get into. Welcome to SailNet!
 

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37' Pearson
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sounds like you have a plan and a supportive partner: two good things. A Pearson 37 may draw more than some would prefer for the Bahamas, but there are still lots of places you could get into. Welcome to SailNet!
Hey Paul, thank you for the welcome and the advice on the draft limitations.
I am going to keep an ear open for a different vessel, something with a fin keel to lessen the draft to about 5'. The plan is to keep the Pearson as our backyard baby when we are back on the West Coast for the Summers and find something that will be a comfortable live-a-board.

Over the last few month I have come across some good deals on 38+ mono hulls down that way. Our plan at this point is to take a 1-2 week exploration vacation and get a feel for some of the different locations in the Bahamas. With some reaching out we hope to talk to some local expats that have already dropped anchor in the area.
 

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Master Mariner
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I think the biggest thing to consider is that import tax in the Bahamas (even on items you send to the states for repair) can be up to 100% and that even your corner store where you presently live, is better stocked than most out island markets. Take what spares for the boat you may need, and plan on returning to the states at least once a year for items unavailable in the Bahamas.
Being from the left coast, you probably have little or no familiarity with tropical storms and squalls, therefor a class in tropical meteorology might be a good idea. It is a bit nerve wracking to spend more than half the year keeping close watch on the weather.
I'd also suggest a plethora of anchors and tackle plus plenty of chafe gear, should you have to go through even a tropical depression.
Some fish in the tropics should not be eaten, as they are extremely poisonous. Always check with a local about which fish are safe in the area you are in, not another cruiser. The islanders do not often eat sharks, saltwater clams sometimes known as pen shells, or the huge spider crabs. All are great food, relatively common and easy to catch.
Keep in mind that great ventilation and large amounts of storage are necessary, if you plan to live in the out islands. Some say a deeper draft can be a disadvantage in the Bahamas, and it may indeed keep you out of some areas, but I have cruised the Bahamas with a draft of 9.5 feet without any major problems.
 

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37' Pearson
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think the biggest thing to consider is that import tax in the Bahamas (even on items you send to the states for repair) can be up to 100% and that even your corner store where you presently live, is better stocked than most out island markets. Take what spares for the boat you may need, and plan on returning to the states at least once a year for items unavailable in the Bahamas.
Being from the left coast, you probably have little or no familiarity with tropical storms and squalls, therefor a class in tropical meteorology might be a good idea. It is a bit nerve wracking to spend more than half the year keeping close watch on the weather.
I'd also suggest a plethora of anchors and tackle plus plenty of chafe gear, should you have to go through even a tropical depression.
Some fish in the tropics should not be eaten, as they are extremely poisonous. Always check with a local about which fish are safe in the area you are in, not another cruiser. The islanders do not often eat sharks, saltwater clams sometimes known as pen shells, or the huge spider crabs. All are great food, relatively common and easy to catch.
Keep in mind that great ventilation and large amounts of storage are necessary, if you plan to live in the out islands. Some say a deeper draft can be a disadvantage in the Bahamas, and it may indeed keep you out of some areas, but I have cruised the Bahamas with a draft of 9.5 feet with any major problems.
Thanks capta,
I have been doing no research on the logistics of supplies and weather. Our plan was to spend the Winter months down that way and back up to the other coast for Summer time. The other tidbits were new, and thank you for those bits.....golden.
 

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37' Pearson
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Welcome aboard!

If it's about securing a comfortable liveaboard and not big passage making, maybe explore a catamaran? Spacious, comfortable, and shallow draft.
I have seen a couple blogs from cat owners. I have always been a monohull owner, not sure about the learning curve on my end. Honestly the cost might be a factor on my end from what I have been seeing.
Any advice on models if we do starting looking down that line?
 
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