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Discussion Starter #1
We are wanting to get quotes to ship a Columbia 45 Sloop via boat hauler and need to know the height from the bottom of the keel to the top of the windshield (I assume that is the highest point).

Any information that would help out is appreciated.

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I can't imagine that would fit on a trailer - at least with its keel attached - while they arent deep draft they are very high sided - I assume this one is a center cockpit - being 45 feet they are going to be wide - I think wherever its located and to wherever its going - its going need to go by water. Also Colombia 45's are at the lower end of the price scale - don't invest too much in transporting it - unless for some reason its your dream boat and you are going to keep it a very long time.
 

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I think the truck can’t be taller than 13’ 6”, before needing special permits and routing for height, which can be cost prohibitive. You may still incur the expense of width permits, escorts, etc, depending on which States are traversed.

From online pics, the distance from the waterline to the top of its large coachroof appears to be at least 6’, maybe even 7’. I won’t bet against taller.

The full keel option reportedly drew 7’3” and the shoal keel drew 5’3”. If she has the full keel, it clearly won’t fit, because the trailer itself has to be a foot or more off the ground. The shoal keel seems too close to call.

I‘d say paying a delivery crew is more friendly to the boat than dropping her keel. If you drop it anyway, it’s the right time to consider replacing the keel bolts, but that can add up.
 

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Sorry that I can't help with the OP question, but I think you may need to make your own measurements. I would recommend that you measure to the top of the windshield (if it has one) and to the top of whatever hardware may be on the cabin roof. If their is a windshield, it may have to be removed, in order to get the height of the boat to an allowable number.

One of the reasons that 13'6" is a magic number is that this is the typical height of bridges in the U.S. While 1' seems to be normal for many boat trailers, some trailers can be dropped to be only 6" off the ground.

Are you planning to haul the boat a short distance or a long one?

Jim
 

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We are wanting to get quotes to ship a Columbia 45 Sloop via boat hauler and need to know the height from the bottom of the keel to the top of the windshield (I assume that is the highest point).

[email protected]
If by windshield you are referring to the dodger, as long as it is not rigid it will likely be removed for transportation.

I agree with most it is likely cost prohibitive. Are you on an inland lake with limited boat options and need 45 feet? A cross country transport will likely be $10,000 plus, more likely 10s of thousands.
 

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Jordan, I confess, that I don't know much about the Columbia 45, but a quick search on-line noted it might actually have a windshield. Of course, I could be wrong as it wouldn't be the first time! :)

Good point about the dodger, however. This, as well as other canvas framing should be removed from the boat. Not only does this reduce height it takes a tremendous beating during transport. A rigid dodger might have to removed as well, again depending on the height of the boat off the ground. This is one of the biggest issues with moving powerboats with flybridges is that quite often the flybridge needs to be removed for transport and then reattached at the destination.

Jim
 

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According to the specs, it has a vertical clearance of 50.75' and a P measurement of 36.33'. Assuming the boom is 2' above the windshield for clearance, this gives 12.4' from waterline to top of windshield. Maybe being more generous and subtracting another foot for distance above the sheave box and below the tack fitting would give 11.4' from waterline to top of windshield. Adding the keel, this looks like it's going to be taller than 13.6'.

Is the windshield removable? That might get you another 2-3'.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the responses. The costs quoted are from $8K to $10K and will likely involve at least another $2.5K to cover the costs at both ends for the prep and reassembly. I agree, the best option would be to sail it down the coast from Oregon to California.
 

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Sounds like you bought the Columbia 45 that was in the course of being rebuilt with the new engine and generator not installed. Beautiful work done so far but a long way from seaworthy.
We bought a 1972 ( Hull # 16) from the son of the original owner a year ago since Dad had passed away and the son was a new father without time for the boat.
Fortuitously, the original owner kept all the paperwork ( including the original owner's manual) and the manuals for the auto pilot, stove, tel cor instruments, etc.
I attach the plumbing, electrical and deck hardware from the original Columbia plans. The manual also has the prop, engine and shaft dimensions at Chapter 5 with the measurements and prop details for both the 4108 and 4236 Perkins installations.
We have a 4236 with packless shaft and 20 X 13 LH three blade that replaced the original Perkins in 2004.
If you're trying to install the newer Perkins ( if that was you asking about engine mounting rails) I would suggest using a boat yard or Diesel Mechanic because the alignment of the transmission and shaft is very tedious work. We have re-powered Columbia's in the past and even Like, Kind and Quality engines are fraught with cable and fuel line relocation, etc.

Col 45 Deck Hardware.jpg
Col 45 Plumbing Plan.jpg
Col 45 Wiring Diagram.jpg
 

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Thanks for the responses. The costs quoted are from $8K to $10K and will likely involve at least another $2.5K to cover the costs at both ends for the prep and reassembly. I agree, the best option would be to sail it down the coast from Oregon to California.
I am surprised it is 'only' that much. It is a lot of boat to transport. It might cost you a good percentage of that to have delivered by a Captain. Especially as the season is getting late. Any Captain I would trust to deliver a boat would want the engine installed and tested before departing.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I am surprised it is 'only' that much. It is a lot of boat to transport. It might cost you a good percentage of that to have delivered by a Captain. Especially as the season is getting late. Any Captain I would trust to deliver a boat would want the engine installed and tested before departing.
Of course, before I sail it or have a captain sail it all systems will be installed and seaworthy.
 

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Of course, before I sail it or have a captain sail it all systems will be installed and seaworthy.
In that case you might want to reconsider shipping via truck. At least factor in if you are not able to deliver it yourself the cost of a Captain, and possibly needing to wait to spring and then having to do have all the work done in another state out of your ability to watch over it.
 

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Not sure why you are pushing hiring a captain so hard. If I am able to get the boat in seaworthy condition for the trip, I will either sail it myself or find a crew with experience sailing a similar size sloop to join me. I am not new to boating or projects of this magnitude. I plan to spend a month on the boat soon to see how much I can get done myself. I have received recommendations for boatyards and marine engine installers for any help I may be deficient in.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
In that case you might want to reconsider shipping via truck. At least factor in if you are not able to deliver it yourself the cost of a Captain, and possibly needing to wait to spring and then having to do have all the work done in another state out of your ability to watch over it.
Which is exactly why I am on the boat doing the work to get it ready. I do not want to have the work done remotely without being able to watch over it. My previous experience with boatyards has been mixed. Unless I know the people and their reputations I am nervous about other peoples work and designs.

If you have personal knowledge about marine work for the Portland, Ore. area please pass it along. I will add it to the recommendations I have already received.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I think the truck can’t be taller than 13’ 6”, before needing special permits and routing for height, which can be cost prohibitive. You may still incur the expense of width permits, escorts, etc, depending on which States are traversed.

From online pics, the distance from the waterline to the top of its large coachroof appears to be at least 6’, maybe even 7’. I won’t bet against taller.

The full keel option reportedly drew 7’3” and the shoal keel drew 5’3”. If she has the full keel, it clearly won’t fit, because the trailer itself has to be a foot or more off the ground. The shoal keel seems too close to call.

I‘d say paying a delivery crew is more friendly to the boat than dropping her keel. If you drop it anyway, it’s the right time to consider replacing the keel bolts, but that can add up.
Agree with your comments. One of the considerations I took into account to sail it rather than truck it is the amount of work and hassle of unstepping the main mast, the radar mast, and removing most of the dodger including the SS structure. If I am able to get it into seaworthy condition I am better off financially as well as wear and tear on the boat as opposed to trucking it.
 
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