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I am guessing the only reason they say that is that people tend to only tighten wing nuts hand tight. If you put a wrench on them they can be tightened down just fine. That said, it is a simple matter to swap them out for her nuts. Higher end batteries come with bolts instead of threaded posts.

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Slipping wrench or pliers = short ... often a pretty dramatic short.
 

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Slipping wrench or pliers = short ... often a pretty dramatic short.
Yeah, that goes for any tool around battery terminals regardless of the type of nut on the terminals. That's why the crescent winch on my boat has an insulated handle.

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Maybe, but the "wing nuts" that came on my Jeanneau where simply plastic wings molded over a hex nut. I don't get that at all. I took a pair of pliers and broke off all the plastic nonsense.
Mine were the same. I broke one of them tightening a terminal with my bare hand! I got rid of those pretty quick!

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Just had our soon to be new used boat surveyed. I didn't know that instead of wing nuts you are supposed to use hex nuts to make the battery connections for big wire according to ABYC.
Also don't use stainless steel washers "between the cable lug and the battery terminal". SS is a relatively poor conductor.
 

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Why dont dock masters check every new boat/slip renter, specifically the basic electrical setup before giving them the ok to rent a slip? I would think that would be pretty high up on the list considering the average age of a lot of boats is probably 25 years or so. I would certainly sleep easier at night knowing the 30 year old yacht that just moved in with (11) 20 something year old partiers aboard every weekend was at least up to some basic ABYC code. Not to mention it would start to force the older boats into a slow schedule of upgrades that really should be done anyways by any reasonably aware/competent owner.
 

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There are a few yacht clubs on the Great Lakes doing t
Why dont dock masters check every new boat/slip renter, specifically the basic electrical setup before giving them the ok to rent a slip? I would think that would be pretty high up on the list considering the average age of a lot of boats is probably 25 years or so. I would certainly sleep easier at night knowing the 30 year old yacht that just moved in with (11) 20 something year old partiers aboard every weekend was at least up to some basic ABYC code. Not to mention it would start to force the older boats into a slow schedule of upgrades that really should be done anyways by any reasonably aware/competent owner.
There are a few yacht clubs on the Great Lakes doing that (albeit sporadically). It only costs about $400 for the equipment and staff can be trained to use it in an hour. It takes much more training to understand it but at least they can find the vessel with the problem and demand it be addressed or refuse dockage.
 

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Why dont dock masters check every new boat/slip renter, specifically the basic electrical setup before giving them the ok to rent a slip? I would think that would be pretty high up on the list considering the average age of a lot of boats is probably 25 years or so. I would certainly sleep easier at night knowing the 30 year old yacht that just moved in with (11) 20 something year old partiers aboard every weekend was at least up to some basic ABYC code. Not to mention it would start to force the older boats into a slow schedule of upgrades that really should be done anyways by any reasonably aware/competent owner.
This probably is legally tricky for them. If they inspect the boat and something goes wrong, whose fault is it? The owner? The busy dock assistant who was told a few things to look for on his 10 point check list? I would only check things I can see standing from the dock - rotten spring lines, damaged shore power cables, propane tank craziness, etc. No way would I put myself in the position of doing electrical inspections and saying "OK, you're safe now."
 

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This probably is legally tricky for them. If they inspect the boat and something goes wrong, whose fault is it? The owner? The busy dock assistant who was told a few things to look for on his 10 point check list? I would only check things I can see standing from the dock - rotten spring lines, damaged shore power cables, propane tank craziness, etc. No way would I put myself in the position of doing electrical inspections and saying "OK, you're safe now."
No need to go on the boat at all. Testing for AC leaks is done with a clamp meter over his shorepower cord.
DC leaks do require a ground contact on the boat, simply hand the owner the ground probe and tell him to connect it to a ground them drop the silver silver chloride cell in the water.

There are other possibilities but these two tests will catch the majority of issues and should be considered a minimum.
 

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No need to go on the boat at all. Testing for AC leaks is done with a clamp meter over his shorepower cord.
DC leaks do require a ground contact on the boat, simply hand the owner the ground probe and tell him to connect it to a ground them drop the silver silver chloride cell in the water.

There are other possibilities but these two tests will catch the majority of issues and should be considered a minimum.
I guess so. People were talking about ABYC and "up to code", was where I was going with that. Yeah if you can check that from the dock and that's the only thing you're interested in, that seems to be a no brainer.
 

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Our yacht club tests each boat for voltage leaks as part of a mandatory
annual safety inspection, and as a result we don't have a big galvanic corrosion problem. My last set of zincs still had life left when I changed them after 18 months.

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This probably is legally tricky for them. If they inspect the boat and something goes wrong, whose fault is it? The owner? The busy dock assistant who was told a few things to look for on his 10 point check list? I would only check things I can see standing from the dock - rotten spring lines, damaged shore power cables, propane tank craziness, etc. No way would I put myself in the position of doing electrical inspections and saying "OK, you're safe now."
Whenever anyone moves into a new marina a current survey is needed. Force the surveyors to add in a sub survey that specifically focuses on the basic electrical system and its safety condition, not allowing tenancy until it meets a minimum safety spec. I dont think it needs to be 100% ABYC compliant just whatever the industry or those smarter than me feel is a good base level of safety.

I remember my survey. I had a very reputable and highly recommended local surveyor. He took one look at my electrical and shook his head and said "thats certainly not up to ABYC code" As a new boat owner and first time owner it took me several years to learn and figure out what was wrong and the magnitude of the problems. Had it been a requirement to get a specific electrical survey that could pinpoint the issues and potential costs, i would have either walked away from the boat or had it fixed (which would have cost less than 1K). I could have elected to have an electrician do this but in my ignorance as a new boat owner i had absolutely no clue of the ramifications so it was completely off my radar.

Now almost five years later im fixing it and doing it right but what risks was i exposing myself and my neighbors to in the meantime?
 

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Whenever anyone moves into a new marina a current survey is needed. Force the surveyors to add in a sub survey that specifically focuses on the basic electrical system and its safety condition, not allowing tenancy until it meets a minimum safety spec. I dont think it needs to be 100% ABYC compliant just whatever the industry or those smarter than me feel is a good base level of safety.

I remember my survey. I had a very reputable and highly recommended local surveyor. He took one look at my electrical and shook his head and said "thats certainly not up to ABYC code" As a new boat owner and first time owner it took me several years to learn and figure out what was wrong and the magnitude of the problems. Had it been a requirement to get a specific electrical survey that could pinpoint the issues and potential costs, i would have either walked away from the boat or had it fixed (which would have cost less than 1K). I could have elected to have an electrician do this but in my ignorance as a new boat owner i had absolutely no clue of the ramifications so it was completely off my radar.

Now almost five years later im fixing it and doing it right but what risks was i exposing myself and my neighbors to in the meantime?
If a surveyor used ABYC compliance as their only metric then most European boats would probably fail! There are a number of things on my boat that are not "ABYC compliant" but still perfectly safe.

I would assume most marinas require insurance, and most insurance companies require surveys. One would hope the more egregious electrical safety issues should be flagged in that survey...

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Whenever anyone moves into a new marina a current survey is needed. Force the surveyors to add in a sub survey that specifically focuses on the basic electrical system and its safety condition, not allowing tenancy until it meets a minimum safety spec. I dont think it needs to be 100% ABYC compliant just whatever the industry or those smarter than me feel is a good base level of safety.

I remember my survey. I had a very reputable and highly recommended local surveyor. He took one look at my electrical and shook his head and said "thats certainly not up to ABYC code" As a new boat owner and first time owner it took me several years to learn and figure out what was wrong and the magnitude of the problems. Had it been a requirement to get a specific electrical survey that could pinpoint the issues and potential costs, i would have either walked away from the boat or had it fixed (which would have cost less than 1K). I could have elected to have an electrician do this but in my ignorance as a new boat owner i had absolutely no clue of the ramifications so it was completely off my radar.

Now almost five years later im fixing it and doing it right but what risks was i exposing myself and my neighbors to in the meantime?
Grounding, bonding, fuel system grounnding cathodic protection, GFCI's. ELCI's should all be part of a regular survey.
Take a look at the FUEL SYSTEM, AC SYSTEM, DC SYSTEM and CORROSION PROTECTION
sections on one of my survey reports ... Sample marine survey report
 
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