SailNet Community banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking for a boat I can race in PHRF on San Francisco bay. I will be sailing short- or single-handed a lot, but I would like something that can do well with a full crew as well.

I spend a lot of nights on the boat, so it needs to be reasonably civilized down below. Not a live-aboard cruiser, but I am planning to do some long range cruising as well. Mexico, Hawaii, Alaska...
I have owned large heavy cruisers and I know I don't need as much as those type of boats can offer, and what you give up trying to club race a boat like that. What I want is a do it all fast boat around 35 Feet.

Please discuss
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,489 Posts
I've always liked the Express 34 and 37.. locally we have a 37 that is frequently sailed solo.. Not sure all J-36s have Vberths. A Santana 35/Schock 35 might also be on your list, with the Santana's again not likely to have a real V berth but having an easier-to-handle fractional rig (Which, if primarily shorthanded would be on my 'dealbreaker' list)

Depending on version, the various Js may or may not have what would be considered a good cruising cockpit (seats/backrests etc)

Some of the late 80s/early 90s Beneteau Firsts had fractional rigs and are quite quick AND nicely appointed. I know of a B 35s5 that's done the Mexico run and back more than once. Same with similar vintage Hunter 'Legends'.. 35.5, 37.5.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I actually prefer the masthead rig for its versatility, so fractional isn't a selling point for me. If I were leaving for a very long trip, I would likely ditch the foul and use a conventional head stay and use hank-on headsails. Also, the seat backs and so on are not priority. I like the clean cockpit feel and access to winches that a more racer-like arrangement give, and I don't mind sitting on the cockpit floor. For the same reason I like a tiller to steer. It keeps it simple and does the job fast. I kinda feel like the same functionality that serves a racer also serves a cruiser.
 

·
Freedom 39
Joined
·
1,156 Posts
When owned by a very good sailor, a local J-36 used to win every regatta it raced in. The new owner still hits the podiums regularly but is using high school kids as crew. The ratings seem to really favor that boat. I raced on it once and couldn't believe it's windward abilities! Set up right, like just about any boat, it could be single handed. The one I was on needed crew for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,264 Posts
In San Francisco I think you would have to really have a reason not to buy a J-105 if you plan to race at all. The 105 has a huge fleet there, year round OD racing, lots of guys willing to help you, and a lot of corporate support.
 

·
Freedom isn't free
Joined
·
2,971 Posts
I'd consider the J/35 as well. I've been eying a few locally... pipe dreaming mostly. But I agree that the Shock 35 should also be on your list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
I had almost the exact same requirement. My short list was J35c, J35c and Express 35 (Goman). I bought an Express 35. I've only sailed it twice and so far I'm not disappointed at all.

John
 

·
Freedom 39
Joined
·
1,156 Posts
Hey, Farcry Where are you racing and what's the local rating for the J/36?
Around here in the Virgin Islands. Most regattas around here have been using CSA ratings for years. I spent a few minutes trying to find a rating and I saw .853 with a double head sail. I don't think I've ever seen her raced in that configuration. If you google Cayenitta Grande, you should find lots of hits from all the successful races that boat and Tony has won. After being sold the boat was renamed Paladin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I'd consider the J/35 as well. I've been eying a few locally... pipe dreaming mostly. But I agree that the Shock 35 should also be on your list.
I sail primarily in the San Francisco Bay and I intend to do some ocean sailing/racing. Not looking at a shock as that's a pretty race specific light air boat with shoal draft and fairly skimpy construction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,760 Posts
Since you want to both race and cruise, I would lean towards one of the cruising J's - J34C, J35C, J37C. The J109 would be ideal, but since newer, will be much pricier. The J35 (not the C) will probably be the least expensive, but many are well used after many years of racing. I also like the Express 34 and 37.
 

·
Dirt Free
Joined
·
2,659 Posts
If you want to race around the cans on a Wednesday night, go for any of the J's. If you want to run to Hawaii or Mexico I'd suggest you don't buy a boat that has the winch mounting bolts right through the balsa core like the J's. I've seen one rip out on a three year old 105.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,161 Posts
If I had your requirements, single-handed racing (which I did when I was looking for my current boat) I would definitely look for a fractional rig.

The advantage of a fractional rig for short handed racing is the ability to shift gears on the fly with fewer headail changes and reefs. For distance racing a fractional rig can be set up with both masthead and fractional chutes, and use the frac's in heavier going.

Re the J-35 vs J-36, years ago I spoke to R. Johnstone about the J-36 vs J-35. His take was that the J-36 was a superior boat for short-handed/ single-handed racing, especially in a breezier venue. The J-35 does typically gives the J-36 6 seconds a mile (in some regions even 9 seconds a mile), but the J-36 is generally faster boat for boat on a windier course, or when there is more reaching than found in a windward-leeward course. He also felt that the J-36 rating was a gift even on a windward-leeward course. The typical J-36 'turbo' optimization moves are to remove the wheel and go to a tiller like a J-35, add a masthead chute, non-penalty pole length, and lower the boom height and extend the boom length for a bigger main. Of course you pay for that in your rating.

I would add a couple boats to your list:

Farr 1020 (34)
Bashford 36 (Sydney 36)
Dehler 36
Tripp 36
Farr 38 (AKA Farr 11.6 design 72) (This was my first choice and so I bought one. I have had staright first place finishes in the single-handed races that I did with her. Pretty comfortable down below.)

If you are insistent on going masthead rig, then the Express 37 would be my hands down first choice of those mentioned. Other choices might be the

Olson 34
Frers 36
Farr 37
Tripp 37
IMX 38

Then there are the odd and exotic like this extremely heavily modified NY 36 which has a custom keel, rig and rudder. http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1981/New-York-36-Race-Winner-36-2401121/Cambridge/MD/United-States
 
  • Like
Reactions: Faster

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,620 Posts
Thanks Jeff. We've sailed our J/36 for the past 12 years and done very well. We've beaten every J/35 we've come up against boat for boat. We've managed to pass J/109's as well, though courses with a spinnaker reach make that more difficult. On those occasions we rely on our rating to pull ahead on corrected time. They're tough: we've beaten for hours into 6' waves in 35knots of breeze. We've hit better than 12.5 knots in 40 knots of wind with only a reefed main up. We've cruised up to Massachusetts and Maine in comfort, with an interior that is comfortable and looks good. There's a stove with oven (great for fresh Maine blueberry muffins) and an icebox big enough to be useful. Engine access is exceptional. The Express 37 is a good boat too, if you like their layout. The smaller boats probably won't be as comfortable or as fast. J/105s are not amenable to good standing posture for most of us.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top