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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a call from Doyle today. They want $700 to fix my asym. Actually that includes fixing the dowsing sock too, since that needs a repair where the plastic mouth meets the fabric sock. (The thing looks just like a manta ray's mouth.)

The spinnaker is in great condition except for the multiple tears that they are fixing.

The previous owner left the spinnaker in the bag wet for quire some time, so it has stains all over it where the red and blue leaked onto the white.

So after spending $700 I'll have a stained, otherwise excellent spinnaker, with a functional sock.

Question: Should I go for the $700 or am I putting good money after bad? I see used spinnakers on ebay for not that much more. It sure would be good to not have a stained one. The spi is really out there when you're flying it. I'm not sure I want to look like dirty laundry coming in from a distance.

What do you think?
 

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Whom is to say after spending $700 for a new used sail, that you will not rip/tear that one, and spend another $700 to fix it!

My thinking............OUCH.....note to self, do not THINK!......ouch!...dang it pulling a brain muscle here!

I would repair the old one, and use it until it is broke beyond a reasonable doubt! Then get yourself a shiny new one! In the mean time figure out how it the old one works, if it breaks.....not a big loss!

Of course, if you have some funds burning a hole in your pocket.............

marty
 

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Glad I found Sailnet
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Some more information: It is ripped in about 5 places, each 1-3 feet long. I don't think it happened in use, it probably happened when it was being dowsed or something.

The asym came with the boat. It wasn't even in the listing, so it was a pleasant surprise when I went through the boat the first time.

Here are some pictures from before it went to Doyle. (Footware is included to show scale.)







Edit: I figured out why the pictures weren't showing up. I had spinnaker in the URL. It added a space like it just did here --> "spinnaker" <-- see.
 

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For some reason I can't see the photos. But if it's in reasonable condition, I'd agree with Marty that it's probably worth the repair cost.

It might prove a good practice chute for a few seasons, then when you and your crew have built more proficiency (and gauged how often you really use it), you might consider getting a new one.

One final thought. Have you yet hoisted this chute to confirm that it actually belongs to your boat? The fact it wasn't listed on the inventory creates some lingering doubt -- it would be a shame to spend the money repairing it if it wasn't the correct size for your boat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
For some reason I can't see the photos. But if it's in reasonable condition, I'd agree with Marty that it's probably worth the repair cost.

It might prove a good practice chute for a few seasons, then when you and your crew have built more proficiency (and gauged how often you really use it), you might consider getting a new one.

One final thought. Have you yet hoisted this chute to confirm that it actually belongs to your boat? The fact it wasn't listed on the inventory creates some lingering doubt -- it would be a shame to spend the money repairing it if it wasn't the correct size for your boat.
Good point. I can measure where I had it laid out to see the size.
 

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Chesapeake Sailor
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Another vote for the repair. They will probably replace the panels with a tear in them. (I had one repaired by Doyle a few seasons ago). It will come back as strong as new and at a lot less expense than the >$3.5K replacement cost.

Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Another vote for the repair. They will probably replace the panels with a tear in them. (I had one repaired by Doyle a few seasons ago). It will come back as strong as new and at a lot less expense than the >$3.5K replacement cost.

Wayne
I was wondering about that. They said it was an all day project. That has to mean replacing the panels. Suddenly it seems like a good idea. And all the rips are on the white panels IIRC, which have the stains. So there'd be fewer stains.

I want to fly it.
 

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3.5 k allmost sounds to cheep on a 50' boat :eek: there 1700 hundred on my J24 and the kevlar 150 is up to 2200 hunderd :eek:
 

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Chesapeake Sailor
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t,

3.5 k allmost sounds to cheep on a 50' boat :eek: there 1700 hundred on my J24 and the kevlar 150 is up to 2200 hunderd :eek:
You may be right on the cost! Mine was $2,500 for a 39-ft boat 8-seasons ago. $3,500 for a 50-foot boat may be tough to find. Just a guess, I guess.

Wayne
 

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Bene505, I think spending US$700 to repair a spin is way too expensive. Heck for $700 more you could buy a brand new spin from Hong Kong. If it were mine, I would use spin repair tape to fix the tore area (been doing that to my spin anyway) and replace the mouth of the sock with cut-out from plastic bin (buy $5 from Ikea store).
 

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Lots of money spent on a junk sail. I'd put it toward a new one and fix the old one myself to practice on, meaning repairs and actually flying it. You might not even want to mess with a spinaker after trying it a couple of times.
 

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Resdog is dead on...

All of the worst "opps" potencial should be experienced on and old dog, and any sailor should know how to fix a sail; your sailmaker is not going to follow you on every trip, and knowing contingency seamanship is the mark of a sailor.

Tape it, and then hand-sew the edge of the tape - great practice.
 

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The guys at Doyle Huntington would tell you the sail was JUNK if it was they have no interest in being dishonest

We also keep a lot of older sails patched up for training and delivery some spinnakers are 25 years old and while there NOT race sails there still worth putting in some money here and there
 

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Mark on Camper 58
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We had the same pleasant surprised mentioned above when our Nicholson 58 ketch arrived. We found matching kite and mizzen stay sails that looked like they had never been flown. The kite is in a new sock. I can hardly lift the bag.

New pannels should be a good fix as long as Doyle says the rest of the material has not lost its siezing or is otherwise compromised. Even if its not exactly the correct sail for the boat (Doyle can look this up) it is still good to have one.

Suggestion for spinnaker design. On the Heritage One-Ton I used to race one of the spinakers was specially built for us to suit the heavy, stiff Heritage. We had a 3/4 oz tri-radial with first two panels of 1-1/2 oz on the luffs. This extra material let us run that sail to 22 knots apparent without stretching. It was a killer race sail and held shape for many seasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I told them to go ahead and fix it. Actually my exact words were "if you don't hear from me by tomorrow, go ahead and fix it". That gave time to get everyone's feedback on this, and if I got busy with something it would still get done.

I can't wait to fly it.

MrWuffles and the other Long Islanders/NY-ers/CT-ers: You're going to help fly it, right? It's been a long time since I've flown one on my old boat. Oh, and this one has a sock, so free lunch to anyone who's used a sock before who can help.
 

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Dang it, on the wrong coast! ie left coast myself.

Socks are pretty easy honestly, Hoist the sock head up with halyard. make sure the sheets and tack line are correctly installed where you want them, Then hoist the sock from the front deck. Then some one in the cockpit needs to make sure the clew is somewhat sheeting in etc as you hoist the sock.

You do not need the jib up to hoist it, nor do you need it up to dowse. If you find your self in Seattle before flying your sail, look me up, and we can go out in my boat. Or find your self out here either on the 7th, 14th or 28th, and you can join me on those races that are 20 to 35 miles ea!

marty
 

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I told them to go ahead and fix it. Actually my exact words were "if you don't hear from me by tomorrow, go ahead and fix it". That gave time to get everyone's feedback on this, and if I got busy with something it would still get done.

I can't wait to fly it.

MrWuffles and the other Long Islanders/NY-ers/CT-ers: You're going to help fly it, right? It's been a long time since I've flown one on my old boat. Oh, and this one has a sock, so free lunch to anyone who's used a sock before who can help.
Never flown one but sure looks like fun especially on your boat! I think caleb has some spinnaker experience.
 
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