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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have made up my mind that I am going to sell the house and buy a boat. My plan is to spend the next year looking for a boat and getting the house ready for sale. But I get seasick :puke . Should this keep me away from this dream.

Pete
 

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Hiya Sailmachine,
Great decision to go cruising. A few questions for you. How seasick do you get. Many people feel sick for just a few days and then magically, they feel OK. Others are like death warmed up. Where do you fit in?

If someone could feel a bit off, I give them a job to do - like steering or 'on watch'. Having some responsibility often means they havent got time to be sick. This would be you if you are the skipper - plenty of responsibility = no time to be sick.

Also if you know you are prone to seasickness, why sell the house - you may need a place to go back to??

Anyway, just my 2cents worth.
Cheers
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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No, it probably should not keep you away from your dream.. Almost all of us get seasick at times. There are great meds for this. Unfortunately the best are not available in the US. Many people experience sickness in the first few days but get sealegs after a few days at sea. Others are not so lucky.

If you are incurable you might experiment with where you choose to cruise. There are cruising grounds whose sea states are mild enough where seasickness is less likely to occur.

One more suggestion: 1. There are people who are only affected by rapid in changes in motion. 2. There are people who are only affected by large angular changes in motion. 3. And there are people affected by both. It would be helpful if you tried to figure out which of these you were and if you are type 1 or 2, then I would try to pick a boat whose motion suits your tendancies. People who are type 1 do best with traditional designs and only very specific modern designs. People of type 2 do best with the better motioned modern designs (meaning not just any modern boat) and tend to do very poorly with traditional designs. For type 3 there is only drugs....

Jeff
 

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Pete, some people acclimate, some people can make do with drugs. Others never do and, hey, I'll never be an NBA star either, I can't shoot hoops.

The best thing you can do is to figure out how to start sailing regularly, to give your body a shot at getting used to it. And to look into the causes and remedies for seasickness, to minimize the effects on you. Plenty of threads on the web about that. No booze, no smoking, no greasy foods, good night sleep, general good physical shape before you go, all contribute to being more resistant to seasickness starting. A hangover and a good whiff of diesel fumes can set many folks off in no time at all.

Then there's the meds. There's a long long list of meds and gizmos, most work with different success on different people. You need to go down the list, starting with the simple ones and working your way into the rx-only ones, to see what works for you. The best way to do that is to start by taking one--and only one--at home on the weekend, see if it knocks you out or there are any adverse effects. Once you know how it feels to simply USE the med, you can use it on the boat and you don't have to worry about whether you are also imagining effects from the drugs.

Only one way to find out if you can live the dream: Step up and try it!
 

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try ginger pills or ginger root tea--with honey---and those wrist bands. i havent ever in my life gotten seasick--so i have no mercy or sympathy--dunno the feeling of seasick unless i take vicodin --then i get something like seasickness--LOL----but the ginger tea should help and ginger snaps --some swear by ginger pills....some wear wrist bands and feel fine...gooood luck.....
 

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Hiya Sailmachine,
Great decision to go cruising. A few questions for you. How seasick do you get. Many people feel sick for just a few days and then magically, they feel OK. Others are like death warmed up. Where do you fit in?

If someone could feel a bit off, I give them a job to do - like steering or 'on watch'. Having some responsibility often means they havent got time to be sick. This would be you if you are the skipper - plenty of responsibility = no time to be sick.

Also if you know you are prone to seasickness, why sell the house - you may need a place to go back to??

Anyway, just my 2cents worth.
Cheers
Good Advise...

I have also found that when people first start getting sea sick do much better when becoming actively involved in the boat such as at the helm. It seems to me that the hand / eye/ ear work better with each other when at the wheel. You get feedback and I think that helps your systems counter the initial ear problems that result in sickness. If an anchor take a dip and cool the body off, don't get too physical swimming just float a bit.

I do not care for drugs except for short term use in hard cases. The First Day and Night Out are OK to have newer or unsure people on some form of sea sickness prevention medication. However most will have side effects such as being sleepy and not as alert. Always be a LERT! Dry mouth is another problem common with many medications.

Ginger in many forms appears to work well. I particularly like Ginger Beer nice and cold. Much better than Ginger ale or cookies. I know many who take Ginger tablets but they seem to take too long to work effectively.

It is almost impossible to help sea sickness once it passes a certain point.... best to put on a harness and barf over the sides until your tummy is empty rinse mouth & have a cracker and do not drink or eat for a few hours.

If I'm having to so something below with the engines while underway in rough seas I start getting a bit weesey particularly when it is hot. Getting back up to where wind can cool me and taking a moment allows it to pass quickly for me.

If your on a Catamaran and get sick... well just die... you deserve it!:laugher
 

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So far all good advice. Very few people suffer from chronic seasickness, which is being sick all the time when underway. I am retired Coast Guard. I spent about 4 years of my career on ships and I was only seasick for the first few days, the first time we went to sea. I haven't been seasick since. But I served with a Captain, my C.O., on a ship who was chronically seasick. He had 34 years of sea time. So I suppose we can all live through it.

There are meds and other ways of dealing with it as stated. Buy the boat and go have a good time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I sail a Venture 22 now and do fine. I also do fine on small power boats. But that's all inshore. My last big boat experience was a ferry ride at Cape May. I did not get sick but had felt better. When I was younger I hated to ride in the back seat of a car, and a whale watching trip when I was 7 or 8 did not go to well. I don't get on fair rides. Worst case it would limit me to coastal cruising.
 

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I've been working/living/sailing on boats for 13 years and was always seasick for the first three days of any rough water until 2005, when I began taking meclizine. Sometimes being sick offshore makes you feel like it'd be better to just die, but then you eat, barf, and get over it. A lot of the folks who say they never get seasick actually feel queasy but never barf. I'm glad I can get it out of my system and move on. It's important to just keep eating and drinking, even if it seems like a waste. Pedialyte, sports gels, and dried meat that you can suck on and eventually chew always helps. Sublingual vitamins help as well. My friends say the prescription Promethlizine is now the drug of choice.
 

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promethezine is phenergan and is a med that will make you drowsy----is also used with analgesics like demerol to potentiate them into working better ---and with some pre-op meds for surgery---makes pain meds "better" and keeps nausea down.....ginger is good--half strength gatorade makes the hydration not become water intoxication, which is even worse for you than seasickness---need to stay hydrated so the stomach doesnt compound the sickness---dehydration causes nausea and vomiting----is a difficult combination to really fix well..need the fluids and the electrolytes---pedialyte is a good choice--if get cramping from drinking it--half strength it also-can half strength it with juice--is good that way--kids even drink that combo!!-will not cramp you as much...have fun and good luck.....
 

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Stay off of boats.
Why would you say that? Are you just kidding?

Pete,
There is no way that seasickness should keep you from cruising if that's your dream.
I get car sick, air sick and sea sick. I've even gotten queasy while working on a boat tied up to a dock in the intracoastal on a windy day.
I have also been sailing since I was a child and never plan to stop.
There are all sorts of remedies. You will find the one that works best for you and there ya go. Problem solved.
If you are doing a crossing or a long passage, even the worst afflicted, like myself, will gain their sea legs in three or four day and then you can stop the meds.
Don't let anyone tell you that you shouldn't sail because you get sick.
 

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As some have said earlier, getting seasick can be temporary. I've been really sick 3 times, sub on a 12 hour surface transit out of Hong Kong in a typhoon (very happy to get to the dive point), three day ride on a sea going tug in the South China Sea from PI to Hong Kong with 20ft+ seas on the Stbd Bow the whole way. Was bad. First day of a delivery from USVI to the US (Hang over + greasy berakfast burrito + 20kt winds and a confused choppy swell=bad, very bad)

In none of those cases did I use meds before I got sick. The scop patches I had in my bag would have been a good idea for the USVI trip. Even the capt. who had just come off of a couple of weeks of chartering was feeling pretty bad that day. I finally got a nap and felt better quickly.

You really need to get out and see what makes you sick and how long it lasts, do you recover or are you sick for days on end. If you are one of those who never recovers you may have a problem, but then again, Lyn Pardey indicates that she hasn't got the strongest stomach on the ocean and she's lived out there for decades.
 

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Stugeron works just like a placebo on me: Not at all. And it is not legal for sale or use in the US. Phenergan was used by NASA at one time in their "cocktail" for astronauts. Scope patches work great for most folks--as do the scope pills, which have quietly been back on the market for at least 10 years now. But like any heavy duty drug, there's a strong list of serious possible side effects. And *none* of the meds works well for more than 1/3 of the people that try them. Not my opinion--NASA's extensive and repeated test results. For them, motion sickness is quite literally a killer, they've done a lot of investigation into it.
 

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Pete,

How much sailing experience do you have? Seasickness seems to affect people differently, but I have found that I get seasick really quickly on a boat that is adrift or under motor power, but a boat making good headway under sail has a different type of motion that doesn't make me sick, even in strong winds/waves. Also, being at the helm will prevent me from getting seasick.
 
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