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midlife crisis member
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
That is awesome. I have a lot to do on mine and the ideas from these photos is great. Let me ask you, the strapping that the cedar(?) is fastened to, it is epoxied onto the hull?
 

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Junior Senior
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That is awesome. I have a lot to do on mine and the ideas from these photos is great. Let me ask you, the strapping that the cedar(?) is fastened to, it is epoxied onto the hull?
The strips behind the cedar are cut from 1/2" pressure treated plywood. I had to cut kerfs in them to allow them to conform to the curvature of the hull. I bought the cedar strips at Menard's. They are 5/16" thick tongue and groove strips sold for wainscoting.

Conventional wisdom says to epoxy the furring strips to the hull. I was working on the boat outside in my driveway in early winter and the temperature was way too cold for epoxy to set up. I used Gorilla Glue instead. It has a broader range of temperatures it can be used with. I left a worklight on in the boat that generated enough heat to keep everything above freezing.

I did this last winter, and so far the Gorilla Glue has held up well. Here in Minnesota we get temperature extremes from -30 in the winter to +95 in the summer. Also, this is a very lightly built boat so it probably flexes more than a more substantial craft (although I have never actually noticed any flexing.) Neither the flexing nor the temperature swings have broken the Gorilla Glue bond.
 

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Telstar 28
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Heinzir-

I'm not sure I'd be comfortable using pressure treated lumber inside a boat. The compounds the pressure treated wood is treated with are very nasty and fairly toxic... and I'd prefer not to be stuck in an enclosed boat with them.. Just MHO...
 

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Heinzir-

I'm not sure I'd be comfortable using pressure treated lumber inside a boat. The compounds the pressure treated wood is treated with are very nasty and fairly toxic... and I'd prefer not to be stuck in an enclosed boat with them.. Just MHO...

Hasn't affected me at all. I'm still perfectly nromal -- mornal -- normle -- damn!
 

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Have you read the warnings on the stuff...and the fact that the poison used to treat the wood can leach out... If you're going to have kids aboard...best not to use pressure treated wood on the interior.
Dog, you worry too much dude.
 

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I think any poison that leeches out of the wood would have done so long ago. I cut the 1" strips from a portable launching ramp I had made for my dinghy many years ago. It had been outdoors exposed to the elements, and the lake, for many years. I needed to make a new one, so I salvaged what I could from the old. I could have used marine plywood but my budget did not allow that. I used what I had.

In any case, the treated wood is not being used in large expanses, such as a bulkhead. The relatively small number of 1" X 24" pieces are completely covered by the cedar ceiling.
 

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Dog...

when I was a kid we used to swim in raw sewage, drink tap water, sleep in lead painted beds, drive cars with no seat belts, and no airbags, we rode bikes with no helmets, we didn't send kids to karate classes, we had no shrinks, we all smoked indoors....and damn it....


I'M STILL HERE!!!!!!!​
 

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Telstar 28
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GUU-

And all of that shows....

:laugher
Dog...

when I was a kid we used to swim in raw sewage, drink tap water, sleep in lead painted beds, drive cars with no seat belts, and no airbags, we rode bikes with no helmets, we didn't send kids to karate classes, we had no shrinks, we all smoked indoors....and damn it....


I'M STILL HERE!!!!!!!
 

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Censored4 your protection
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192 Posts
Some prospective



And I love every inch if it!
 
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