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Preparing to do the first oil change on my newly purchased boat. I'm used to servicing outboards. I don't need any technical advise but I know I don't have a oil pan that will fit in the bilge area. So how do you guys keep from making a mess. Should I suck it out, maybe cut the top off a 2 litter bottle? How do you guys do it?
 

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I suck it out the dipstick .... but youre not going to get it all out, so you should modify your change time interval:

Example.
Total rated oil capacity = 7 quarts
Total able to remove from engine = 5 quarts
Recommended Change out interval = 200 hours.

NEW change interval 5 ÷ 7 X 200 = 142 = ~150 hours

;-)
 

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Suck it out of the oil dipstick tube. Its a pain in the bloody neck.

Warm the engine for 30 minutes to make it flow better. Yep, its hot, but easier to suck.
 

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Engine type would be helpful...if it's an A4 you can get a thingy from Moyer Marine that bolts right on and lets you use a pump without snaking it down the dipstick place. Product No. - KTAS_05_90

Moyer Marine Page

Works quite well for me.
 

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My boat has this jabsco hose attached to the sump (Jabsco Oil Drain Hose And Fitting Kit) I think the universal engine came with it. Its easy to attach a pump and get the oil out of the oil pan. After getting the pieces together I can change the oil under 30 minutes with little hassle. Seems a whole lot easier than messing with pulling it through the dip stick. The hose is long enough that I can get the end above the oil level to remove the plug and attach the pump with little to no mess. Worse part is changing the oil filter.
 

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Sucking it through the dip stick tube is the most common, as mentioned. However, be sure you can measure what you remove to know if you are really able to get most of it out. Some motors are canted back, with the dipstick in front, so oil pools behind your pickup. Our motor actually has two dip stick tubes. I can get nearly all from the aft tube, but if I go in the front, it will leave an entire quart behind!

I was really tempted to install a fitting to the drainplug, with a hose that comes up to the side of the engine compartment. If one ever did so, that fitting really needs to be installed with red permanent loctite, but good luck getting it clean enough to work. A failure of that fitting or hose would dump all your oil in the bilge. By the time you realized it, severe damage would probably occur.

Final thought on extraction devices. Get a manual one. They make all sorts of fancy electric gizmos, but they aren't worth the money, nor do they even work as well.
 

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We've got one of these built in:

Oil Change - OP-6


On previous boats, I've pumped it out the dip stick after warm up. The messy part is usually the filter change. Why is the filter always in a strange location that insure's you'll spill a pile of oil everywhere?
 

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As someone said, you want the oil hot, not just warm. Makes a huge difference.
 

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We've got one of these built in:

Oil Change - OP-6


On previous boats, I've pumped it out the dip stick after warm up. The messy part is usually the filter change. Why is the filter always in a strange location that insure's you'll spill a pile of oil everywhere?
Buy a remote filter kit. Mount it anywhere you want.
 
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Why is the filter always in a strange location that insure's you'll spill a pile of oil everywhere?

Thats called Design.

It prolly took them years and 14 international conferences to get all the engine manufacturers to bugger it up so perfectly! :rolleyes:
 

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I use one like this also. It works easier than one might think, and it gets out more oil than one might think also. After an oil change, my oil is very clean. You just have to play with how far you stick it down to get the last bit of oil. Then, tape the tube so you have it marked for next time.

I use something like this..and draw most of the oil out through the dipstick tube

Manual Vacuum Pump for Transmission Engine Oil Removal Through DIP Stick Tube | eBay

Then, I let gravity drain what little oil remains in the pan into a plastic bottle. I have a tube attached to lowest point in the oil pan to accomplish that. It's just so low that the bottle has to lay flat..to capture the oil.
 

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Preparing to do the first oil change on my newly purchased boat. I'm used to servicing outboards. I don't need any technical advise but I know I don't have a oil pan that will fit in the bilge area. So how do you guys keep from making a mess. Should I suck it out, maybe cut the top off a 2 litter bottle? How do you guys do it?
In addition to the dipstick vacuum oil extractor (WestMarine), use oil absorbent pads, paper towels and newspaper, large plastic garbage bags, rubber gloves, and a used plastic gallon milk jug(s).

Spread newspaper on the cabin floor in the area adjoining the engine compartment. Put oil absorbent pads under the oil pan and oil filter. Have roll of paper towels and garbage bags handy for inevitable spills. Make sure the vacuum pump is stable. Cover nearby cabin cushions with plastic bags. Removing the spin on oil filter is the most challenging part - I have had to drive a screwdriver through it in the worst case of being overtightened. Check the engine block fitting for extra spin-on oil filter gasket stuck to block.

Be patient with the vacuum pump - it takes quite awhile to remove all oil. After oil removal, bring full vacuum pump to street/parking lot to transfer used oil to milk jug for dirty oil collection center (I use AdvanceAuto).

It is a messy job. The question is not whether you will spill or drip dirty engine oil, but how much and where.

I have all the elements onboard for an oil change at anytime: oil filter, extra oil and extractor. I store my vacuum pump oil extractor in a large clear plastic bag in the cockpit locker. You never know when you will accidentally add water/coolant to the oil fill cap (don't ask).
 

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We have a powerboat with a couple of Mercruiser 350 Mag MPI's. The oil filter is actually mounted upside down. We poke a hole in it with a screw driver to allow most of the oil to drain out of it, but still a little mess.

Thats called Design.

It prolly took them years and 14 international conferences to get all the engine manufacturers to bugger it up so perfectly! :rolleyes:
 

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I spent a small fortune acquiring a state of the art marine diesel engine that requires me to suck oil out the dip stick through a 1/4 inch tube. There has to be a better way! Why they can't put a tube out the bottom of the crank case is beyond me. Perhaps the guys at Yanmar have never had to maintain one of their engines afloat. Grrrrrrrrr.:mad::mad::mad:
 

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Buy a box of disposable gloves. I use latex. Have a kitchen roll at the ready.

Make sure you have several heavy duty garbage bags and WORK INSIDE THEM.

Put a bag around the filter and drop it into a gallon jug you cut the top off which is in the bag already.

If you use the Jabsco pump it needs to have some soapy water run through it before you store it. I have a gallon jug with soapy water prepared and at run it immediately. Store pump in a Ziplock.
 

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Why is the filter always in a strange location that insure's you'll spill a pile of oil everywhere?
Very simple. The oil pump is always at the very lowest 'altitude' in an engine and the next highest in 'altitude' is the lube oil / filtration portion - where the developed oil pressure is the highest possible oil pressure in the engine. The higher the pressure, the more efficient the filtration.

If the oil filter was located to a more convenient or 'higher' location it would be operating at lower oil pressure (because of piping friction losses, etc.) and you'd need a filter with much larger filter media surface area, a 'stronger' oil pump and the need for more oil capacity.
Simply a case of 'optimized efficiency' over convenience.
 
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