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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.

I'm first-time owner (not first-time sailor) and my boat has just arrived at my marina. I'll be cleaning and working on it this weekend.

Just wondering: for shore power: do I simply plug one end of the cable into the shore side and the other to the boat and viola, I have power (i.e. 110 outlets)?

Thanks
 

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Simple answer...Yes...assuming you have a standard shore power cord and standard shore power connections on both dock side and boat side.
Make a habit not to turn on your main boatside breaker (or shore side breaker) until the cord is plugged in. And...turn off one of the breakers before you unplug your cord as well.
 

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Power pylon/service?
Check
30 amp cord?
Check
30 amp plug on boat?
Check
Breaker on panel/shut-off sw/grd fault recept. on boat?

??????

Other than that? Check condition and serviceability of the above.unplug all110v stuff aboard ta start with, IMHO;THEN check all receipts for GF and neutral ...ya never know ;)
GTG :D
 

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Maybe, if you have an inverter or generator on board, you might have a transfer switch to switch for land power to other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No inverter or such. 1978 C&C 27 MkIII. Marine breaker panel and battery switch. two batteries: house and crank. both connected and previous owner only charged via alternator.

boat is on the hard, so won't be running engine til next week.

I just want to be able to plug in some small appliances: lamp, fan, etc.
 

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So your plugging into a 15-20 amp recepiticle (typical 120), Correct? Just make sure your cord length is not long. If it is make sure you are using the appropiately sized cord, BIG.
No problems.
 

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You gave no indication of size of the boat, amount of power required and whether you have the proper cord for the boat.
Whatever you do, you must insure that the shore power cord is appropriate for the onboard load. A 12 gauge extension cord is not going to run a battery charger, and air conditioner and the fridge. A 30 amp cord with proper ends will, and more.
If you are plugging a cord into the boat, you should also be certain that the boat has a proper 110 volt ac distribution panel, with main breakers and individual breakers for each circuit, and that they all work. I've seen panels where the bad breakers have been circumvented, leaving no protection on that circuit.
Hooking it all up for the first time, it wouldn't be a bad idea to be certain you have a functioning fire extinguisher handy.
 

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Power pylon/service?
Check
30 amp cord?
Check
30 amp plug on boat?
Check
Breaker on panel/shut-off sw/grd fault recept. on boat?

??????

Other than that? Check condition and serviceability of the above.unplug all110v stuff aboard ta start with, IMHO;THEN check all receipts for GF and neutral ...ya never know ;)
GTG :D
Yep, invest $5 in one of these do-hickeys. Easy way to check that.

 

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If I were you I'd at least inspect the 110V wiring. The receptacle where your shore power cord plugs in is a frequent failure point - the connectors corrode, then things start melting when you turn on your high-current stuff (heater, kettle, etc.). Had my shore power plug and receptacle both fuse together into one lump of melted plastic last year. Luckily I was on the boat at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I bought the boat from a seasoned sailor and all-around gentleman, so I am confident everything works and is in proper order; I just wanted to make sure of the order of things: i.e. make sure everything is off and then plug n' play
 

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I bought the boat from a seasoned sailor and all-around gentleman, so I am confident everything works and is in proper order; I just wanted to make sure of the order of things: i.e. make sure everything is off and then plug n' play
Your seasoned sailor probably didn't live to be a seasoned sailor by blindly trusting his life to someone else and not double checking that something as important as the electrical system is up to par. However much of a gentlemen he is.

A gentleman would not be offended if you do your due diligence and ensure for yourself (and your insurance company and the other boats in your marina) that he didn't miss anything important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Exactly. That's why I thought I would double check here. But what more could I do other than a visual inspection?
 
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