SailNet Community banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
41 - 60 of 64 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,047 Posts
One of the limiters is whether you can handle the weight of the sails. For single handling, you really need a roller furler for the jib and either lazy jacks or a furler for the main. However, the real issue is when they tear or jam or you need them down for an emergency. At best, we can only drop ours and lash them to the deck or lifelines. Fortunately, we have room between the boom and cabin top to get the main down, but not all do. It takes two people and calm winds at the dock to properly flake and fold them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Thanks John and Minnew,
All great ideas to consider! I sure can relate to throwing the jib over by hand when jibing, as I hate surprises! I understand a larger boat would require more thinking and less muscle. But as I get older, I assume will be a natural progression.

So to sum up thus far; would I be dreaming to think in terms of single handing a forty five footer with roller furling, lazy jacks and auto pilot? Would I be smarter to go with a yawl rig? I'm still thinking the limit might be a forty footer.

By the way, while I'm only dreaming after all, lets make it a Hinckley!

One last thing; Why are some people so concerned about the age of the post? If we are enjoying it, does it matter if it's twenty years old?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,047 Posts
I know a guy that single hands a 44 ft boat, it's all in how she's rigged and how proficient the skipper is. Find one you like and see if they will let you take the sails down by yourself on the dock. That will answer your question.

As far as replying to old posts, it's generally advised to start a new one if you would like to discuss a topic. However, anyone that wants to resurrect an old thread that contains information relevant to the discussion they would like to have is fine by me, but most seem to be done by new members by accident. If intentional, one can put a link to the old thread in your new one.

You will note, however, that this thread was resurrected by answering someone's question that was asked 4 years ago. That is a common newbie mistake, as they arent used to seeing when the post was made to know that their answer isn't relevant to the inquirer anymore. In fact, the original poster, whose question was being answered, hasn't even been signed on the forum since Dec '07.

I would agree that some get their shorts too tied up in a knot over this, so hopefully, those of us that point it out do so in a constructive tone. This supposed to be a fun place.

Edit: I coincidentally stumbled upon an example. Here is a new member's first post ever, responding to a request for deliver crew from 18 months ago. That ship has sailed.

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/crew-wanted/63778-delivery-skipper-wanted.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
I'd love to talk with the guy on the 44 footer!

But you have brought up a very good idea to try handling the sails first, if possible.

Do you ever single hand yours? Is it a 54' Jeanneau?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,047 Posts
I'd love to talk with the guy on the 44 footer!

But you have brought up a very good idea to try handling the sails first, if possible.

Do you ever single hand yours? Is it a 54' Jeanneau?
Yes, it is a 54' Jeanneau. I have single handed my boat, sort of. For giggles and practice, I've taken her out, set sails, tacked, jibed, etc. However, my wife has actually been aboard and there, for when I've had enough. We've practiced single handed emergencies, but the best we would do with jammed or ripped sails is drop them and lash to the deck. We have every line coming to the cockpit, but the cockpit is fairly large, so getting from the helm to the lines coming through the cabin top organizers is an exercise. The autopilot better be operative. Both the main and head sail are each on furlers as well.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,467 Posts
Bene505 hangs out here at times. He singles his 50' boat.

The dude is very cool. He didn't even get mad when I drank all his booze.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,309 Posts
Zanshin is another on here that SH's his boats. He should be taking delivery of a jeanneau 57 any day if he has not already. His was in Annapolis as the sales boat.

Marty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
I realize that the original post was years ago, but now that you are discussing the limits to single-handing, I thought I would chime in. I started with a Catalina 30 as my first boat, which I single-handed all the time with no problems. My current love is a Catalina 36. She is a lot more boat than the C30 was, but still managable single-handing. I do have a headsail furler, Dutchman reefing on the main, an auto-pilot, and all lines led to the cockpit, so she is set up for it.
Anyway, the key to single-handing any boat is to do it, a lot, in all conditions. I get better each time I take her out and have been in 35+ winds by myself. I know, probably not too smart, but definitely doable. The problem that I found with big winds was when I wanted to furl the sails. Much more work, but man did she fly! :D

Cheers, Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I COULD single hand my boat. However, the being fast and thinking ahead thing is not very relaxing. Because you have to think of everything...and ahead, prepare for the worst etc. I single handed a 40' boat. It had power winches, self tacking jib, in-boom furling, autohelm with a little remote you can wear around your neck to offset rudder angle if needed. I felt damned near relaxed on that boat.....except coming into the slip. My boat does not come with these "labor saving" devices. I do have Autohelm. But If i have to dump the main in a sudden 42 kt gust then I have to get my leg around the wheel (or jump up on the cockpit seats) and move forward to the mainsheet in a cam cleat near the companionway. When I single hand a small boat, it just plain feels manageable. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Thank you all for such wonderful responses!

I am starting to get it. (I think) You can handle a lot, but how badly do you want to?

In the future, I plan to do some winter live-a-board sailing, if all goes well. I'll have my wife with me to help take the helm, but I hate to count on her always being able, as she is handicapped. The trade off in more work for a larger boat seems like a trade I'd be up for. So at this point, I'm still dreaming of a 40' Hinckley. (maybe a bit larger)

In the meantime, I couldn't be happier with my Morgan 24/25. (she swells to 25', when she wants to impress the other boats)

Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,189 Posts
I've got one word for you, anchoring.
Your single handling your 45 foot boat the engine dies you have no windless and you have to strike the sails and drop the hook.
Your going to be busy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,047 Posts
Dare I say, if your heart is set on living aboard a Hinckley, you need a bigger version to accommodate your required living space? I love the lines and quality of a Hinkley (and it's logo gets attention at the marina), however, maximizing living quarters per foot of LOA is not their value proposition.
 

·
Barquito
Joined
·
3,703 Posts
I think we should keep this post going until the OP gets back from her 4 year cruise.:D

I my opinion, the limit to single handing a large boat is what will happen when things go wrong. Can you hold the bow line when wind starts blowing her off the pier? Can you get a couple hundred feet of chain off the bottom if the windlass fails? Can you get that huge genoa down in a sudden squal? Realize, this really is just opinion. Some feel uncomfortable relying on the mechanical things things that surround us on big sailboats. Some are more worried about the large sea in a small boat. It is all priorities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Dear Susan,

I just bought an Allied Luders 33. I think that could be a great boat for you, especially if you are already familiar with it. I love ours, and feel good about singlehanding it. I have a partner in the boat, and I can say for sure that that made a huge difference when we hauled the boat. Two people flushing the systems, cleaning up, and covering it and worrying about it worked well and made me more comfortable that I had all my bases covered. Also expensive repairs get 50% cheaper.

The Luders is pokey, but easy to handle, rock solid and they can be surprisingly affordable. In fact, you should look at the all the Allied boats, which tend to run on the cheaper side of things but are still very able. I see Seawinds for under $30k (I don't know much about them).

My partner, who is saltier than I, says, the key to a good partnership is not sailing with your partner. We divide up the time and when it's your turn with the boat, you own the boat.

Also if you think you will be singlehanding a lot, get a good auto pilot. I use that much more than I thought I would, even with crew aboard. But it's great for running up and setting the sails or untangling a situation if there's a problem. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
single Mom, Single Hander Single Paycheck

So, I'll chime in 'cause I just got back from a little single handed cruise that highlighted for me the virtues of "go small go now". I live aboard a much modified Pearson Vanguard (Insulated above the waterline, refrigeration, solar, furler and a few other upgrades).

Its winter sailing season here in New England, so I went out in twenty five knots of breeze and cruised to a barrier beach and hung for a couple of days. Needed one reef in the main and then the helm was well balanced. The estuary has a very shallow bar-went aground oh...fifteen times trying to bump my way out on a rising tide-full keel kept me upright-fin would have been uhmmm-problematic. In my boat it was a gentle thump, thump thump all the way out. I don't have a windlass yet, setting and raising anchor is so much easier on a thirty two footer. The autopilot draws little power and its oversized for the boat-but still the least expensive one the manufacturer sells.
When problems arise on my boat at sea the maxim "little boat, little problems" seems to apply. I've single handed all along the New England Coast and many who have gone MUCH further in these little boats. For those of us on tight budgets and able to do the necessary work ourselver\s (I actually enjoy doing the work on my boat) they can be a viable albeit anachronistic approach to getting out there.
Just one guys opinion.
Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Minnew,
Your Hinckley thought is a very good one. But it makes me think of a woman comparison. Would you rather have one that's a great cook or incredibly sexy? I don't know about you, but I'd eat Pop Tarts for "sexy". ;)

Barquito,
I'm with you on keeping the post going. We should track down the original poster and get her back here to face to lot of us! :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,047 Posts
Minnew,
Your Hinckley thought is a very good one. But it makes me think of a woman comparison. Would you rather have one that's a great cook or incredibly sexy? I don't know about you, but I'd eat Pop Tarts for "sexy". ;)
There are sexy women who can cook. Don't settle. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Dare I say, if your heart is set on living aboard a Hinckley, you need a bigger version to accommodate your required living space? I love the lines and quality of a Hinkley (and it's logo gets attention at the marina), however, maximizing living quarters per foot of LOA is not their value proposition.
How much space does one need ?
 
41 - 60 of 64 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top