SailNet Community banner

21 - 28 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,066 Posts
I have single handed and anchored my boat for 35 years from Maine to Brazil. I don't know or care about anyone else's technique. Mine works for me... and that's all that matters. I share stuff so others can try and see if it works for them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
I'm curious to hear about anyone's experience singlehanding a Union 36 or similar (Tayana 37?).

I singlehand my Catalina 27 and sail in and out of the slip like it's a dinghy. Piece of cake.
But the Union....well.... that seems a bit tricky to me.

Have you found it easy enough to manage when entering an unfamiliar marina? What about anchoring solo?

Thanks much!
The biggest problem will be the mass and unresponsive helm on a heavy displacement full keel boat. No last minute large changes in direction and possible inability to head up into a strong wind. Approachs in marinas or other close quarters will have to be thought out and executed near perfectly. You just can't turn, stop or start a Union or other boat of that type like you can a 6,000# fin keeler. No that it can't be done but the consequences are much worse if you screw up.

Anchoring is a piece of cake. Pick your spot, drop the hook, and back down to set it. It's weighing the anchor that's the challenge. There is no way you are going to move a heavy displacement boat against more than a light wind, any sea, or current without a windlass and all chain rode. A manual windlass will work but the take up is awfully slow and chains you to the foredeck to haul in any rode. Electric windlasses are almost a necessity to be able to motor up to the anchor when you are single handing. My procedure is to set the autopilot to run up the rode with the engine at idle than go forward and use the windlass to haul in the slack rode. If all goes well, can stow the anchor then go back to the cockpit and set sail. In crowded anchorages, the auto pilot and electric windlass combination is almost a necessity. Remote controls for the windlass and/or autopilot would be nice but have never gotten around to setting them up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,066 Posts
You do not usually have to motor up to the anchor if you have all chain and a windlass. You take in chain so that the catanary is pulled into a straight line... the chain will then sag into a catanary and as it does it pulls the boat and you are making way... keeping the chain "taut" ie taking out the catanary slack keeps the boat moving toward the anchor. You do this by observing and using the foot switch at the bow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,476 Posts
I can speak very highly of the USC Union Polaris 36.
I have owned one for 27 years and I hope it's another 27 years.
If you are alone, anchoring can be a bit of a challenge, but it is a similar challenge on any boat.
Also, after you have anchored, the 11 tons of the Polaris doesn't bob about much, so the extra weight is not always a disadvantage.
Insofar as you are not trying to turn to weather in a narrow approach with the wind behind you, I have never had any problem heading up in to a strong wind.... you will need a wider turning circle than a fin keeler, but with enough room, the boat will head up to weather without a problem.
For me, the long keel is king. Others have reservations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,386 Posts
I have single handed and anchored my boat for 35 years from Maine to Brazil. I don't know or care about anyone else's technique. Mine works for me... and that's all that matters. I share stuff so others can try and see if it works for them.
Agree on learned anchoring techniques for your boat and tackle. As a semi-reformed luddite, I have had good results with my "old fashioned" CQR, but I have years of practice. Despite all the talk about "modern" anchors, I have seen no reason to switch.

I do have a "modern" (i.e. Mantus) dinghy anchor that has impressive holding power, but it isn't the panacea that aficionados have claimed for this style anchor. You still have to know what you are doing and I don't trust it to "screw itself to the bottom" like some folk imply for this style anchor. That said, it is far superior to the mushroom style dinghy anchors--by far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,066 Posts
R

Agree on learned anchoring techniques for your boat and tackle. As a semi-reformed luddite, I have had good results with my "old fashioned" CQR, but I have years of practice. Despite all the talk about "modern" anchors, I have seen no reason to switch.

I do have a "modern" (i.e. Mantus) dinghy anchor that has impressive holding power, but it isn't the panacea that aficionados have claimed for this style anchor. You still have to know what you are doing and I don't trust it to "screw itself to the bottom" like some folk imply for this style anchor. That said, it is far superior to the mushroom style dinghy anchors--by far.
I am still using the original CQR that came with the boat 35 years ago!
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
12,156 Posts
I originally had a CQR many years ago.
I bought a NZ Rocna 17 years ago and was almost thrown off the boat the first time a dropped it. It has never failed me, turns in current and resets immediately if called upon
Anchoring technique is important
Good anchoring technique and a new gen anchor is the best.


But which would you want in an emergency where you couldn’t use your technique and just had to drop the anchor as the engine failed. ANYONE who has really tried and used a new gen anchor ( rocna, Manson, mantis) never goes back. It’s that simple.

No anchor works great in all conditions. New gens have to be carefully set in grassy bottoms.

Mind you bad technique and most anchors will drag.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SanderO
21 - 28 of 28 Posts
Top