SailNet Community banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked up a new to me 17 ft Siren. I have noticed when sailing on a run the forestay has a lot of slack. The mast only has one side stay on each side and the forestay. It would seem to me by adding two more side stays and running them further back (the current ones are amidship) it would keep the mast from leaning forward causing the slack. Any other ideas?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,488 Posts
That's a very simple rig.. probably all you need to do is evenly increase the tension on the two aft shrouds. Beyond that it's fairly normal for shrouds and stays to slacken when they are unloaded. Performance-wise this slack is most likely not an issue, though.
 

·
ASA and PSIA Instructor
Joined
·
4,243 Posts
Most any rig has a slack foirestay when running, that is completely normal. Race boats with backstay adjusters usually fully release the backstay when running...prodeucting a slack forestay, Should your forestay ever break, innediately bear off to a run, because on a run it is un-needed.
 

·
Cal 9.2 SilverSwan
Joined
·
302 Posts
The Siren was designed for the side stays to be aft of the mast to triangulate the load to the mast being a fractional rig design. When going into the wind the loads from the main through the main sheet and sail will add additional tension to the forestay reducing the sag. When on a beam reach and on a run, the sails will be fuller shaped by the loss of the additional tension from the main. She was designed as a simple no fuss little trailer sailer and with a boom tent, good for boat camping on the weekend..

ps, check out the STAR class when they are on a run, the mast is raked forward 3 to 4 ft!!!
 

·
midlife crisis member
Joined
·
975 Posts
Running additional stays back farther is a bad idea. You won't be able to sheet out the main all the way on a run, and they are not needed. Tighten the shrouds a bit and carry on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Depends a lot on wind strenght too. On a light day slack in the rig, sheets, halyards etc is desirable. Don't point the boat to high when going uphill.
As the breeze gets stronger you need more tension on all. You can also point a bit higher into the breeze in particular if your in fairly flat water. If you've got big waves it can pay to bear away just a bit to give the boat the power to get through chop.
I don't know your class of boat but if you can't adjust rig tension while you are sailing then set it up for the strongest wind you anticipate. If in doubt over tight is probably better than to loose.
All of the above is rule of thumb stuff. It will vary with type of boat, wind and wave conditions and the experience of the helmsman/crew.Trial and error will tell you whats right for you and your boat.
Do keep at it. There is no other sport like it.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top