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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi
I need some help deciding which boat to buy. Perhaps some positives and negatives for similar boat owners would be greatly appreciated.
I'm comparing between a 1979 Com-Pac 16 and a 1986 Seaward Slipper 17. both are at very close price point of $2200. I'm looking for trailerable boat that is easy to single hand and easy to step the mast and set up by myself. would like a little cabin for shelter and an occasional week end here and there. I would like to sail the small and medium size lakes in Minnesota instead of being bound to one lake. I currently have a 22 Spindrift that I absolutely love but it can be a hand full some times when the wind picks up and setting it single handed is out of the question.
I've gotten wet before and had the adrenaline rush with small boats so this time I would like something small but with good stability and easy cruising, speed is not an issue.
I really like the lines for the Slipper 17 but not able to find much info or reviews, it is also better equipped than the Com-Pac that I'm looking at.
I would appreciate your input.
 

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Hi Zaneroni

Sometimes things are more hectic on smaller boats. Less area can translate into less stable platform to sort things out. Your Spindrift is a beautiful boat and though I like all boats, some folks say the other two sail like haystacks. My fav is the CS22 (Canadian SailCraft).

Cheers

Doog
 

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Owned a Compac 16 more than 30 years ago. It was a good first boat for me.

I could rig it singlehanded in the parking lot of the boat ramp.

It was extremely stable and safe, to the point where I would sail it down the South Florida coast from Pompano Beach to Biscayne Bay and the Upper Keys while lumbering 40-footers were motoring down the ICW, too cautious to venture into blue water.

If you run aground, it's a simple matter to step overboard and push it off. But really, it draws 18 inches. You should be able to detect water that shallow.

On the other hand, it is slow and can't point worth a damn with its shallow keel. When you want to go to windward, you have to motor. A five-HP outboard works well. Buy a large genoa if you want to have any chance of reaching 4.5-5 knots. (This was pre-GPS.)

I probably don't have to point out that the cabin is beyond cramped. Sitting headroom. A bucket for a head. A camp stove might be rigged. It's like sleeping in your car.
 

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I have a 16II and like it a lot. No plans to spend weeks at a time aboard for all the above reasons. Great to just get out, enjoy the air, and get back safely.
Maybe a little more room than sleeping in the car, but the point is well made. Can stretch out a full six feet or a little more. Tight, though.
Will not point well and mine likes to sail flat for best pointing. Body movement is noticeable and any weight shift will change performance. Not unstable, however.
If you need more space below, a cp19 might work, but probably won't find for $$ you're looking at.
Solo rigging and launching no prob.
Good luck.
 

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I have a Slipper 17 and it's great on protected waters. It doesn't point well, but I'm really not trying to get anywhere. It's beamy (8 ft) and relatively dry.....and very easy to handle.
 
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