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Hey there

So we all know that different types of boats cross the sea from small boats to cruise ships but, But im more interested in small boats under 30ft cross and what they do to prepare and what do they take with them and such,
 

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Second the recommendation on reading the Pardeys.

I will add one more recommendation as well Ocean Cruising on a Budget by UK based Anne Hammick.

In general terms I would suggest focus on simple, reliable systems. I think even in this size bracket though you do have choices in terms of high or low tech.
 

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Recommend Robert Manry's book TINKERBELLE.

"Robert Manry (June 2, 1918 – February 21, 1971) was a copy editor of the Cleveland Plain Dealer who in 1965 sailed from Falmouth, Massachusetts, to Falmouth, Cornwall, England, in a tiny 13.5-foot (4.1 m) sailboat (an Old Town "Whitecap" built by the Old Town Canoe Co. of Old Town, Maine, which he had extensively modified for the voyage) named Tinkerbelle. Beginning on June 1, 1965, and ending on August 17, the voyage lasted 78 days."

No hoopla just his wife and family knew he had left. A man following his dream.

I have another book on the shelf (which I have not read yet) by Gerry Spiess called Alone Against The Atlantic

"Gerald F. (Gerry) Spiess (born 1940) is a school teacher best known for having sailed his 10-foot (3.0 m) home-built sailboat Yankee Girl solo across the Atlantic Ocean in 1979 and across the Pacific in 1981.

Spiess designed and built the boat in his garage in suburban White Bear Lake, Minnesota, from plywood. After a test launch in the local lake, Spiess transported the boat to the East Coast for launch.[1] He sailed from Norfolk, Virginia, on June 1, 1979, arriving in Falmouth, England, after a 54-day Atlantic crossing."

Small enough for you?:)
 

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Ok, ok, since nobody has mentioned it yet...."Twenty Small Sailboats to Take You Anywhere" is a good start. Most are late 60's to mid 70's, but gives you a great idea of what to look for in a seaworthy vessle.
 
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