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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
On the hard, I went into the boat to take the water out from where it had collected, inside underneath the transom stairs. When I got to the boat, it was leaking water out!

No mistaking it, everything else around the boat was dry. Dry ground, dry deck. And yet there was clearly water dripping down out of the stern.



So I went down into the stern and vacuumed the water out with a shop-vac.



You can see the holes at bottom left. The color must be from long term seeping? (You can also notice the water level now reduced down as far as the vacuum hose could reach.)

The holes actually are part of a series of small holes that look to be part of how the boat was built, only the 2 are clearly letting water in.

Any thoughts on this?

Any suggestions on steps to fix it?

Do you think I have to take the rubber transom protector off the outside to fix this?
 

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If you are referring to a rub strake on the stern and it covers a transom/hull joint, you have a problem - can't tell from the pics and don't know what type boat this is so can't be sure.

Is there a joint there? If so, the only good way to fix it is remove the rubber and clean and re-seal the joint. If water gets out, it can most definitely get in too so do a good job.
 

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Glad I found Sailnet
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I actually think this is how rainwater has been getting in, following the rubber strip, which would put it right into these holes. There's a video for those with very fast connections. It's 30Meg in size, so warning it's big:

http://hallmont.com/pics/sailnet%20posts/holes at waterline.AVI

The boat is a 2000 Beneteau 50.
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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Hey Bene505,
It looks like it is going to be time for a bottom job on your boat. I would offer to help you do this but I am pretty sure that Brewer's Marina does not allow you to do this kind of work for yourself (I hope I am wrong about this but I suspect it is in your contract with them).
Are those 'weep' holes in what you called your 'basement'? One of the real questions is how is the water getting in there in the first place? Condensation and/or some other way? Fixing the weep holes is not such a difficult task with some sanding, new epoxy and glass introduced to the offending areas. Brewer's would probably love to have this work too but since it is inside the boat you can probably do it yourself (yes, I am offering to help out).
PM, email or call me if interested.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Caleb, I also have an email into Beneteau. They've been so great with parts, that I'd like to hear their perspective on this.

If you have high speed internet, take a look at the video.

Regards
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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Bene,
I guess I need to plug my laptop into the ethernet cable as our wifi (wireless) connection does not give me a picture with the video. I will try again.
I forgot to ask if you ever noticed water down in the 'basement' of your boat while she was in the water AND do you think it was only fresh water that was in there?
Caleb
 

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Small holes at the waterline. Seems like lightning strikes make small holes at the waterline or just above. Could there be any connection?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Small holes at the waterline. Seems like lightning strikes make small holes at the waterline or just above. Could there be any connection?
They are very regularly spaced, and they curve up above the waterline, following the rubrail. So I'm ruling out lightening. See the video. (I ought to get a screen shot of the video.)
 

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I looked at your video, to me at least it seems odd that Beneteau would drill so many holes like that at the waterline. What's the point of the holes, I don't see any screws or bolts in them? Might be that you just need to remove the rub-rail thing, thoroughly clean out all the holes, and re-install with new sealant.
 

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Telstar 28
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The holes appear to be fairly regularly spaced and uniform in diameter. I can't think of any reason they should be there though. I count at least eight of them in the video.
 

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Just a thought, which Beneteau should be able to confirm. The holes are evenly spaced at the point where the rubrail attaches, and by inference where the hull and deck/stern join together. I would guess that the holes were there intentionally for some bolts, screws, jig parts for holding the the hull and deck/stern together tightly while the joint was completed (curing time for fiberglass or adhesive that joins the two fiberglass parts). There was probably an oversight in the production of your boat in that these temporary holes were not sealed and glassed over. Also, I think to resolve the problem, you would seal the holes and glass over the holes. When Beneteu sees exactly what you are talking about, they should recognize the situation imediately. Send them some still photos from the video so they can see it exactly, including the uniform hole spacing. Good luck.
 

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Bene,

My hunch is similar to NCC's above. It appears the screws that hold the rubrail in place were too long and penetrated completely through the laminate, creating a path for water to enter the boat as it trickled to the low point of the rubrail. The lingering question is whether these fasteners also serve to mechanically bind the deck to hull.

To save money, most production boats with swim scoop/step arrangements have those features incorporated into the deck mould. So when the "deck" gets attached to the hull, part of that attachment occurs down at or near the waterline at the bottom of the swim-scoop stern. (For this reason, many traditionalists prefer designs where the transom/stern is part of the hull mould, so that the hull-to-deck joint does not extend down to the waterline. But it's more expensive to do it this way.)

Often with these designs, a rubber rubrail gets put over the (unsightly) seam between the hull and deck. Sometimes the fasteners serve double duty and are part of the design to hold the hull and deck together. Not always, though. And It could be that those holes are caused by the hidden hull/deck fasteners, not the rubrail fasteners. Some builders merely tap their hull/deck fasteners into the laminate without actually through-bolting them :)eek: ), and rely more on the chemical bond of adhesives. Some others tap them into an embedded aluminum plate.

Beneteau should advise you on this and suggest an appropriate remedy. (One serious concern would be if there is any coring in that material, but I doubt it.) I would not ignore it though. Keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Are you sure the holes aren't old attachment points for fastners? Has a tank of some sort been removed?
The holes go on the whole extent of the stern, IIRC. They aren't attachment points.
 

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Telstar 28
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If they were for the hull-deck join or the rubrail, they might go the whole extent of the stern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I just got off the phone with Ward at Beneteau USA. He took the time to look at this thread and even downloaded the video to look at the series of holes.

The holes were drilled for the screws that hold the rub rail (bumper) in place.

He recommended removing the bumper, unscrewing the screws that are leaking and resealing them by squirting 3M5200 (with a caulking gun) right into the hole and then screwing the screws back in.

I love the positive attitude they have there. I asked if this was the strangest question he got all week. He said no, this is one of the good ones, it's coming from someone who is trying to take care of their boat. These guys must love sailboats.

Anyway, I got another contact at Beneteau, I'm sure I'll be asking him more questions - intelligent or otherwise. Thanks everyone for the input.

(And I'm thinking maybe I should fill-in the holes from the inside. It couldn't hurt, other than squeezing into the tight space and breathing epoxy fumes, right? But it may be difficult if I use a lot of that 3M5200.)
 

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I wouldn't use 5200 for that... I'd recommend using 4200 or something that you'd be able remove in the future.
 

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Its great you got the reason for the hole answered. Must be nice to have the factory still in business for questions like that :)
I know they recommended 5200, but if I was asking the question, I would of asked why not pot the holes with thickened epoxy as is recommended for most hull and deck holes? Maybe he is responding as he would to a typical owner that doesn't know what potting a hole means, but can handle a caulking gun. Or, that's what they used at the factory in the holes during construction.
 

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Wayne—

The fasteners still go through the holes is my guess...you wouldn't want to fill the hole with epoxy if you might have to remove the fasteners in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
SD,

To Wayne's question, what about filling with epoxy AFTER the new screws are in place? Would that mean that one couldn't remove the new screws in the future? (If yes, then what about putting something on the screws so they don't stick to the epoxy?)

Regards
 
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