SailNet Community banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
There are snaps on the cabin deck for our dodger. They are a snap with a small wood screw in the center that goes into our cabin top.

Uh oh! A couple have come out. Of course you can't just rescrew them because the hole is only slightly larger now. Any suggestions on the best way to reinstall? Should I use some sort of epoxy in the holes and then rescrew?
 

·
bell ringer
Joined
·
5,023 Posts
epoxy, have to enlarge the hole and remove some coring if it is there (probably a good idea as if they came out water has been getting into the hole)

or - larger screws
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
A few of tricks. The first and best would be to just stuff some fiberglass cloth or mat in the hole and screw it back in. 2) Stick a wood splinter on the hole... 3) Use a small piece if solid copper wire in the hole...3) Stick some stainless steel or brass wool in the hole...

If you are concerned about getting the core wet, seal with a caulking when reinstalling as well.
 

·
██▓▓▒▒░&
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
Old carpenter's trick: Remove screw, break off some wooden toothpick or matchstick in the hole. Add some epoxy (optional) and reinstall screw.

On a boat, I'd make sure the use the epoxy. You might want to lightly spray or wax the screw before putting it in, to make sure it can be removed in the future.

Or you could clean out the holes, fill with MarineTex or a similar filled=epoxy product, and drill new holes. Whatever you find more convenient and to your liking.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,951 Posts
On a boat, I'd make sure the use the epoxy. You might want to lightly spray or wax the screw before putting it in, to make sure it can be removed in the future.
I'm in favor of the toothpick or wood (hardwood) sliver and a drop of epoxy. I always use soap rather than wax when putting screws in wood or glass. I just draw the threads across the bar of soap and screw it in. This really helps going in and out, at some future time.
As for the snaps, I am changing over to turn buttons wherever I can as the snaps corrode and either tear the cloth or pull out the screw quite often, after a few years of disuse.
 
  • Like
Reactions: zeehag

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I have had good luck using something to takes up space that will absorb the epoxy. I have used anything from dry wood splinters to paper towel or an old rag piece. The ultimate goal is to not let the epoxy run somewhere else. It depends on the application hole size and whats under it. Once the epoxy hardens pilot the hole for the screw with the proper size bit. Most people use a pilot that is too small.

Pro tip... you know that semi hardened tube of 42 or 5200 in your tool bag? This is where those come in. Snip a corner off and dip the self tapper screw in to still soft sealant. This will slow the purchase of the devil goop and put more of it to good use.
 

·
██▓▓▒▒░&
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
"The ultimate goal is to not let the epoxy run somewhere else"
A piece of tape over the hole will hold in the epoxy paste until it hardens. Masking tape seems to work best, as anything more durable just becomes incredibly well bonded to the epoxy and then it is one more thing to clean up. Thin masking tape, and you don't even need to peel it off before screwing the snap down.

Talcum powder, cornstarch, sawdust, there are lots of fillers if you don't buy one of the cheaper ones from the store.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,917 Posts
A couple years ago I redid all my dodger snaps and attachments. They were not bedded properly when initially installed. Drilled each hole out oversized, filled with epoxy, then drilled a pilot hole for the screw. Used a bit of chalk on each screw when reinstalled. All seem to be holding nicely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
A couple years ago I redid all my dodger snaps and attachments. They were not bedded properly when initially installed. Drilled each hole out oversized, filled with epoxy, then drilled a pilot hole for the screw. Used a bit of chalk on each screw when reinstalled. All seem to be holding nicely.
Why the chalk?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,425 Posts
I would fill with thickened epoxy and redrill a small pilot hole, at the least. The old screw grooves should hold the plug. If wet inside, I would first overdrill the existing hole, by only about a 16th inch, and then dig out some of the core to create a groove to hold the epoxy plug.

I too like twist fasteners better. While a much larger project, you could buy the kit to replace the snaps on your canvas, with grommets. The dual screw twist fasteners would not require the original hole at all.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top