SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When we RV'd full time we were snowbirds. We spent our winters down in the Southern California desert, our summers in the Eastern Sierras. While it was too hot to stay in the desert and too cold to be up in the mountains, twice a year we would stay at some in between place.

Obviously, on the east coast of the United States, snowbirds spend their winters in Florida or the Bahamas.

Where do snowbirds spend their summers safe from the Hurricane season?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,833 Posts
My sister in law's parents would go back and forth from south Florida and the Bahamas in the winter, and spend the summers on Kent Island in Maryland.

I've lived in all of those places, and that's not a bad way to do it.
 

·
snake charmer, cat herder
Joined
·
2,651 Posts
never been a snowbird,never hope to be one. i just slowly relocated until i am not cold in night time. lol.
snow??
is for someone else.
i left that stuff in 1971.
not gonna ever go back.
isnt healthy for some of us to be in coldville.
there are many places where snow is never seen except in pictures or on distant mountain tops, far far far away....those are my favorite places.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,434 Posts
Yup, it was that way our first year as "snow birds"... No one would give up their northern spots.

So.. when they migrate back north, do they just go to Jacksonville, FL or do they go further north to Greenland?
If you're talking about the snowbirds in boats, then I would venture to say that they go back to their home ports in the north.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
I'm not really sure I know what you mean by hurricane season , because we don't have one . I got to know a guy a few years back , he was from Co. Every winter and some times in the summer he would get the slip right next to me (that's Long Beach Ca.) I don't think he had any hurricanes out in Co. to escape . He did say it got a little chilly. So to answer your question Long Beach Ca. We do get what are called the Santa Anna's . It's a hot wind that blows off shore , usually starts the end of Oct . It can freshen to 40 kts .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,600 Posts
As many options as there are boats.
There is a large contingent that stores their boat in various yards in Fl and Ga over summer and drive home north.
There are many who cruise north to marinas or homes from the Carolinas to Maine for the summer.
There are also full time cruisers who head north to various places from the Carinas to Maine.
There are also some cruisers doing the Great Loop heading north to the Great Lakes via the Hudson River and Erie Canal.

Thousands of options.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm not really sure I know what you mean by hurricane season , because we don't have one . I got to know a guy a few years back , he was from Co. Every winter and some times in the summer he would get the slip right next to me (that's Long Beach Ca.) I don't think he had any hurricanes out in Co. to escape . He did say it got a little chilly. So to answer your question Long Beach Ca. We do get what are called the Santa Anna's . It's a hot wind that blows off shore , usually starts the end of Oct . It can freshen to 40 kts .
In this neck of the woods it is all but guaranteed that we will have a hurricane at least once a year.

I've been through a couple in my lifetime living in N. Myrtle Beach, SC. I was in Charlotte, NC the year that HUGO came so far inland and left a path of destruction far from shore.

So when I say hurricane season, I mean to say that I don't want to be in the Gulf of Mexico, The Keys, or anywhere south of Virginia between June and November. Not to say Hurricanes can't hit north of Virgina, but I'd feel safer further north.

Our plan is to try and spend the summer of 2015 in Maine, but I'm still researching the plausibility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
As many options as there are boats.
There is a large contingent that stores their boat in various yards in Fl and Ga over summer and drive home north.
There are many who cruise north to marinas or homes from the Carolinas to Maine for the summer.
There are also full time cruisers who head north to various places from the Carinas to Maine.
There are also some cruisers doing the Great Loop heading north to the Great Lakes via the Hudson River and Erie Canal.

Thousands of options.
I'm not sure that we are going to continue on the loop once we hit New York. The situation with having to step and unstep the mast is very costly.

That being said, I want to cross wake. We would love to spend the summer of 2015 on The Great Lakes but we would come back out the Erie Canal and not down the river system again. But that is a whole different thread.

I really like the idea of Maine though.

Are there good anchorages up there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm looking at the Marina situation in Maine and there isn't much up there. What is up there looks more geared toward people with deep pockets.

Are there many good places in Maine that are friendly to living off the anchor?

We would like to find someplace in the NE so spend a couple of months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,111 Posts
I'm looking at the Marina situation in Maine and there isn't much up there. What is up there looks more geared toward people with deep pockets.

Are there many good places in Maine that are friendly to living off the anchor?

We would like to find someplace in the NE so spend a couple of months.
In very general terms, in venturing anywhere north of the Chesapeake in the summer season, brace yourself for some serious sticker shock regarding marinas, moorings, and so on... Those around here who've been railing against the new mooring field in Beaufort, for instance, or who might believe they should be able to anchor anywhere they please, for as long as they want, well... chances are they might not as thoroughly enjoy cruising LIS or New England during the summer season, as those of us more inclined to accept certain 'realities'.... :)

Not to suggest it can't be done, of course, the coast of Maine alone affords a virtually limitless array of anchorages and possibilities. New England in the summer and fall has to rate as one of world's finest cruising grounds, but it's our equivalent of the Med in terms of also being the playground of many of great wealth, so in certain regards can be a bit of a challenge to those of us cruising on a tighter budget...

If keeping your costs to a minimum is of primary concern, you might consider venturing beyond Down East, up into New Brunswick, or across to Nova Scotia... Absolutely marvelous cruising ground, wonderful people, far fewer boats (and no lobster pots), shoreside access less restricted, and your dollars will stretch a bit further... Cruising in a modest boat, you'll still be welcomed everywhere you go up there, sadly the same cannot be said through much of the NE beyond NYC...

Still, summer cruising doesn't get much better than Maine... as long as you don't mind the 'occasional' spot of fog, of course... :)

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
In very general terms, in venturing anywhere north of the Chesapeake in the summer season, brace yourself for some serious sticker shock regarding marinas, moorings, and so on... Those around here who've been railing against the new mooring field in Beaufort, for instance, or who might believe they should be able to anchor anywhere they please, for as long as they want, well... chances are they might not as thoroughly enjoy cruising LIS or New England during the summer season, as those of us more inclined to accept certain 'realities'.... :)

Not to suggest it can't be done, of course, the coast of Maine alone affords a virtually limitless array of anchorages and possibilities. New England in the summer and fall has to rate as one of world's finest cruising grounds, but it's our equivalent of the Med in terms of also being the playground of many of great wealth, so in certain regards can be a bit of a challenge to those of us cruising on a tighter budget...

If keeping your costs to a minimum is of primary concern, you might consider venturing beyond Down East, up into New Brunswick, or across to Nova Scotia... Absolutely marvelous cruising ground, wonderful people, far fewer boats (and no lobster pots), shoreside access less restricted, and your dollars will stretch a bit further... Cruising in a modest boat, you'll still be welcomed everywhere you go up there, sadly the same cannot be said through much of the NE beyond NYC...

Still, summer cruising doesn't get much better than Maine... as long as you don't mind the 'occasional' spot of fog, of course... :)

It's very crowded and expensive now up here in New Brunswick. :)
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,345 Posts
Yes, the marinas are expensive in the North East, but there are still places to anchor. There are some that anchor all summer long in Beacon, New York. I met an author who anchored there for a year and a half. though his boat was on the shore for the winter, not a recommended thing. And the Mooring field there is quite inexpensive, but they have NO services and you have to supply your own mooring. The only bathroom has no running water and is a composting toilet, and not a liquid separating one at that. Joe the Cobbler stopped there for a night. You are a quick walk to the train station (literally a 2 min walk) and can be in the city in about an hour and a half. Or walk up the street to a very nice town with lots of antique stores, art galleries, world class modern art museum, and restaurants as well as a small grocery store. Really beautiful spot to spend a few days, weeks or months. Historic homes, great rock climbing, hiking and other actives. We were fairly well protected from Sandy and Irene, though we did get some flooding.

I am sure there are areas like that further up the coast. Lots of them you would just have to find, not going to be mentioned in any cruising guide, as there is no advertizing money in these kinds of spots. Just remember the further north you go the more pleasant the weather and the lower the risk of hurricanes. If you don't have a "home port" to end up in, just cruse up till you find someplace comfortable for you. Even places that are home to the "rich and famous" can be done on a budget so long as you don't stay too long. Cape Code, New York City, Montauk, Newport all can be visited without spending a ton of money. They are not cheap, so just don't stay long but they all have sites worth seeing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,689 Posts
You could spend the remainder of your natural life just exploring all the places there is to explore in Chesapeake Bay. I've lived here most of my life and have been on the water since age 10 and there are still lots of places I have yet to explore. It's a great place to sail from April through October, but then it get brutally cold and it's time to head south for the Florida Keys and beyond. Winters in the keys are wonderful!

Gary :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yes, the marinas are expensive in the North East, but there are still places to anchor. There are some that anchor all summer long in Beacon, New York. I met an author who anchored there for a year and a half. though his boat was on the shore for the winter, not a recommended thing. And the Mooring field there is quite inexpensive, but they have NO services and you have to supply your own mooring. The only bathroom has no running water and is a composting toilet, and not a liquid separating one at that. Joe the Cobbler stopped there for a night. You are a quick walk to the train station (literally a 2 min walk) and can be in the city in about an hour and a half. Or walk up the street to a very nice town with lots of antique stores, art galleries, world class modern art museum, and restaurants as well as a small grocery store. Really beautiful spot to spend a few days, weeks or months. Historic homes, great rock climbing, hiking and other actives. We were fairly well protected from Sandy and Irene, though we did get some flooding.

I am sure there are areas like that further up the coast. Lots of them you would just have to find, not going to be mentioned in any cruising guide, as there is no advertizing money in these kinds of spots. Just remember the further north you go the more pleasant the weather and the lower the risk of hurricanes. If you don't have a "home port" to end up in, just cruse up till you find someplace comfortable for you. Even places that are home to the "rich and famous" can be done on a budget so long as you don't stay too long. Cape Code, New York City, Montauk, Newport all can be visited without spending a ton of money. They are not cheap, so just don't stay long but they all have sites worth seeing.
We don't have a home port and are still trying to figure out what our USCG listed port is going to be.

I've been looking into Maine and they don't appear to be "off the hook" friendly in areas that are close to anything.

I look on Google earth and it is clear that there are lots of anchorages in remote locations where one would have to have a great deal of provisions to stay for any length of time because they are not near anything at all.

All we know are our short term plans at the moment.

Beyond next winter and into the spring we are clueless where we are going.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
We have done the North/South thing, starting in the tropics, sailing North then returning to the islands. I never thought I would say this, but, I think we may change our flag and forget about going back down.



:confused:
We didn't learn about the condition of the ICW or the possible closure of "The Loop" until after we bought our boat.

It wasn't our first choice to buy a boat on the Pacific, but NOW, I don't think we would have minded it at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,111 Posts
It's very crowded and expensive now up here in New Brunswick. :)
Oooops, sorry about that, Peter...

Oh well, at least I got to see it before it all went to hell up there... :)

I don't think you have too much to worry about, at least for the time being... Every time I get up to Maine, I'm always amazed at the sort of line of demarcation that Mt Desert and Schoodic appear to represent, and how few boats venture east of there... And, of those who might, very few make it beyond Roque Island/Jonesport...
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top