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Want to make a proper snubber line for my 15,000 lb (20,000 full everything) Gulf 32. Have 300 feet of 3/8 all chain rode. Questions -- Size and length of snubber line? Chain hook vs carabine? Would appreciate expert advice. Thanks.
 

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30' of 1/2" 3-strand nylon, spliced to a 3/8" galvanized chain hook.

Make up two of them, since in heavier wind conditions it often makes sense to deploy one on each side of the bow.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Bill,
Is there a reason for not using carabiners?? Have had chain hooks "fall off" in light conditions and seems like if you were using two one would always be tensioned and the other not.
 

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moderate?
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Two helps keep the boat from swinging on anchor quite so much. Also provides a measure of safety if one lets go. I put a shackle on the chain hook and then buy 2 dock lines with prespliced loops...putting the loops on the shackle...one hook...2 lines. Carabiners can jam when you need to get them off quickly to haul the anchor.
 

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Bill,
Is there a reason for not using carabiners?? Have had chain hooks "fall off" in light conditions and seems like if you were using two one would always be tensioned and the other not.
If you mouse the chain hook it won't fall off. To mouse one is to put a seizing around the end of the hook and back to the main body of it. Put on right the hook will never bounce off the chain. And a sharp knife will remove the mousing when you need too. It is only a temptorary seizing thus you cut it off when finished with it.
Carabiners don't have the same BS (breaking strain not bull Sh*t) that a chain hook has. There are pelican hooks that will stand up to the strain much better then a carabiner. In fact on the larger vessels the pelican hook is used to secure the anchor after it set or housed.
I can throw a mousing on a hook in less then a minute. But then I have been doing it for many years.
 

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Don Radcliffe
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Next time you are in Australia, go into any chandlery and buy a few stainless steel chainhooks. They are not expensive, and will last forever. It mystifies me why you can't buy them in the US. One half-inch line sounds about right for your size boat, as you want the snubber to stretch a lot.
 

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I am using a heavy duty rubber compensator with 40' - 1" double braid nylon. It has and eye splice and I use a stainless steel reefing hook which is a long U with a loop like a hook similar to this one: http://www.go2marine.com/product.do?no=22953F but with a more close and longer U. The hook goes THROUGH the chain and the possibility of falling off is nil. My chain is 5/16", the hook material is 3/8" so it is unlikely it will fail if the chain holds.

I attach the hook to the chain just forward of the windlass and hold the snubber line up as I let more chain out and it passes over the bow roller until in it is well below the water. Then I tie of the bitter end using the windlass drum as a fair lead. The cleats are well aft of the drum so the strain on the windlass is minimal. The snubber lines pass over the chafe free roller and not through chocks.

If the boat shears the lead is fair and won't chade in the bow either.

The compensator adds more stretch and tells me if the anchor is set. If it is it will stretch and untwist a bit under load. Twenty or 30 feet of nylon might strech under load, but you can't see it... and the loading means the anchor is dug in. The compensator works like an anchor "tell tale".

jef
sv shiva
 

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In response to the tendency of a chain hook to come off when the snubber line is slack, I have been successfully using a West Marine velcro tie for mousing. It keeps the hardware in place when the line is slack and is easily installed or removed by hand when time is of the essence. Since the snubber stays in the upper water column, it doesn't seem likely to be scraped off and has been working successfully for me so far. I have much more confidence in this rig than a carabiner. Carabiners can come off when twisted and typically represent a "weak link" in most rigging systems.
 

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Courtney the Dancer
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Nigel Calder recommends using a rolling hitch instead of a hook, anyone else do this? Seems like it would work fine, quick and easy, can't come off and easily undone. Our new boat has all chain rode and I need to decide what I am going to use also, timely thread.

John
 

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Telstar 28
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The one thing I'd add to this thread is IMHO that the snubber lines should probably be longer than what has been suggested here.

If they're not long enough, and you're in a position where you need to let out more rode and increase scope, you'll have to retrieve the rode to the point where you can detach the snubber before you can let out more scope. That would delay your ability to let out more rode.
 

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Nigel Calder recommends using a rolling hitch instead of a hook, anyone else do this? Seems like it would work fine, quick and easy, can't come off and easily undone. Our new boat has all chain rode and I need to decide what I am going to use also, timely thread.

John
I think you would have trouble getting that 3 strand nylon to make a good knot. It does not want to hold well. Maybe yours is different? Maybe a different type of line?

I will say that the chain hook is really easy and the way to go. They are very inexpensive. I heard somewhere that by using it, you would start to wear a spot in the chaing, but I have never seen this.

I use small bungie cords to hold it on. If you do not use that, or velcro, line, or something to keep it on the chain, it will come off usually at slack tide or when the wind dies down.

You can also try buying a snubber and hooking that to your anchor line. I like this approach the best. They really take a nice shock and put little strain on the windlass/cleat. It is more effective than nylong line, IMO. However, they are not cheap and nylon line will work, if long enough.



- CD
 

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Rolling hitch thumbs up

Nigel Calder recommends using a rolling hitch instead of a hook, anyone else do this? Seems like it would work fine, quick and easy, can't come off and easily undone. Our new boat has all chain rode and I need to decide what I am going to use also, timely thread.

John
I have successfully used the rolling hitch method for years. Nothing extra to buy, no extra weak link, the knot is easy to tie and is a knot that comes in handy in lots of other applications (so it's good to know anyway). Tie it right up near the bow roller, then let out the chain to where the knot is at or near the water and adjust the snubber on the cleats. Simple as pie......
 

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We use a shackle. line is nylon double braid run through a rubber snubber like
the one in CD's post and is about tweanty feet long. The line is also ran through a 3 foot piece of beverage hose for chafe protection in between the rubber snubber and the eye. Make sure you by a high quality forged one with a good safe working load. Captive pins are nice too. we also have a thimble
In the eye on the shackle end. It keeps the shackle from wearing on the eye.

Agree with all that recomend two to reduce swing if you have center line roller an use just on put it on the roller and it reduce swing.
 

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We also use a single stainless steel hook with two lines shakled to the one hook. With two lines it seems to keep the tension on and so we hav'nt had the hook fall out. We also let out a fair bit of extra chain which forms a bight behind the hook which helps keep the tension on. The two lines definitely help to keep the boat pointed in the wind, plus it keeps the ropes from rubbing the metal connector to the bow sprit (bobstay?).

The other advice about extra length is a good idea. Our lines are each about 12m (40ft) long each so there is plenty of extra line to let out if necessary.

Ian (ilenart)
 
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