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Moody 376
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive been refinishing the sole boards on my moody. i'm on the final coat of the last three boards... its been a very nice and rewarding project...


Final coat. Two different cans of helmsman. Both clear satin. Same roller. Same prep. Same conditions. Cans came out of the same batch from the factory. The new can is on the left. Old can on the right. Cans were purchased a few days apart. Work was done at 8pm last night. So about 10 hours

Dry to touch no tack

i know I should have blended the two cans together, but they came out of the same batch from the factory so I figured i was good to roll on...

started right worked to the left, and then on to the next panel.

you can see where i changed cans.

I could see if I had done two different panels at different times using different tools

obviously something about the two cans is the culprit... i was hoping to put them back down this weekend...

I'm going to try some de glosser and scotch brite pad, or may be 500 wet to see if I can get the finish back to satin...

worst part is that the ladder was also done with this can and it just as glossy. and it was a PITA to get a nice level no run coat...
Brown Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor
 

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You are fortunate to be able to lift all the boards. When I did my whole boat I had to do many in-situ. (see CABIN SOLE (schooner-britannia.com)
However they finish up, won’t the varnished floor be slippy when wet?
It’s something I was concerned about, and solved using Ephrem’s varnish, unsanded between coats. A nice shiny finish, but non-slip.
Sorry I can’t offer advice about how to solve your current question.
 

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Maybe it’s just me, but I think the cleverest solution for slippery varnish is crushed walnut shells!!

You apply a coat of varnish, sprinkle on the crushed walnut shells (as much or as little suits), then additional coats of varnish. The walnut shells blend nicely.
 

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By the way, the solution to your original problem is to sand as of normal sanding between coats, then put on one last coat of satin, being sure to stir very frequently. I find it necessary to basically stir each time you go to dip the brush in the can.

The best way to achieve satin is to build up the first coats using gloss, then just the last coat or two of satin.
 

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Moody 376
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@rogerhughes18 yeah I don't want the glossy. i want the satin on the right. and all the other boards have come out in satin and through multiple quarts of paint.. the boards under the table are the ones Im working on now. Yes I am grateful that are removable.
Wood Interior design Flooring Floor Wood stain


@Quickstep192 so in theory. a good stir, light sand and reapply i should be good to go? Yeah I thought about blending the cans but since I had the same batch number I didn't think I needed to
 

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@rogerhughes18 yeah I don't want the glossy. i want the satin on the right. and all the other boards have come out in satin and through multiple quarts of paint.. the boards under the table are the ones Im working on now. Yes I am grateful that are removable.
View attachment 143535

@Quickstep192 so in theory. a good stir, light sand and reapply i should be good to go? Yeah I thought about blending the cans but since I had the same batch number I didn't think I needed to
Yes, I think so, but make sure you sand thoroughly. You want the whole thing to be as close to flat as you can get it with no shiny spots. The most important thing though is to stir very frequently while you’re applying the stuff. It settles quicker than you think.

I don’t think mixing the cans would have mattered as much as stirring. Stir, stir, stir.

I’m not a big fan of satin, but the times I have used it, I have literally stirred each time before dipping the brush in the can.
 

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I would think "sanding" with a fine scotchbrite in the direction of the grain would render a pleasing rubbed / satin finish .. ie without and evidence of the "sanding". When brushing varnish it's very critical that the varnish does not show brush strokes or the wood grain. You have to build up a totally smooth surface on which to apply the varnish... which is supposed to be "self leveling/flattening". Viscosity is key for vertical surface to prevent waterfalls and so forth.

You work is looking good! I have a sole for you to do ;-)
 

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It turned out really well.
If it's any consolation to you at all, this will be one of my first jobs as a new owner and your conundrum has already given me new knowledge. I've learned from your slight detour.
 

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Moody 376
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Looks great. You’ll be making people remove their shoes before letting them go below from now on, right? :)
i've got a few guest who never wear shoes. no matter how many times they stub their toes.

the floor is gonna get dirty, gonna get nicked and dinged up. Its a 30 year old boat... now I'm not going to intentionally drop my tools, but i don't think i'm gonna get bent out of shape when it happens..
 
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